Baking stones

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Can you make your own baking stone?

I read it is a quarry tile (unglazed clay).  I suspect they are susceptable
to breaking if they're not made properly.

Does anyone know a reliable method or should I give up and buy one?



Re: Baking stones
On Thu, 16 Mar 2006 22:43:53 +1100, "Shaun Ginsbourg"

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My old baking stone (commercial) recently showed sign of failure with
a crack on both sides (still one piece though).I am considering a
fibrament stone to replace it. www.bakingstone.com

I considered the quarry tile idea, but I was afraid there may be
something in the materials used during manufacture that would not be
good for food items. Who knows where they are made,
or what fillers are mixed in with the clays?

After all, quarry tiles aren't designed for, or manufactured for food
use. They obviously don't carry the NSF certification ( www.nsf.org ).

(I remember when restaurant table legs and rebar were made with
radioactive metal from Mexico).
http://www.window.state.tx.us/border/ch09/cobalto.html

Re: Baking stones
I tried it and wasn't happy with the results - they imparted a taste to
the bread cooked directly on the stone -even with parchment paper.
Besides, it's probably necessary to have a very long burn-in period on
these quarry tiles which means empty oven at high temperature which
translates to money.  Considering that a brand new baking stone can be
had from williams-sonoma for $31 with a lifetime guarantee it seems
like a waste of time -and even money- to go the quarry tile route.

Patrick


Shaun Ginsbourg wrote:
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Re: Baking stones
A question born of ignorance - what is the difference between a baking
stone, and a pizza stone?  

H.
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In article

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Re: Baking stones
Not really born of ignorance...

 If it's called a "pizza stone" it will sell better -as far as I can
see.  Also a "pizza stone" is more likely to be round.  But the
rectangular baking stones are often marketed as a "pizza stone" just to
sell more of them.

Patrick


Rowbotth wrote:
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Re: Baking stones
Thank you for the kind response.  (Actually, I really was ignorant about
these things, but thanks anyway.)

So then the folks who are looking for the baking stones could use a
pizza stone?  

When I bought my Pizza stone, I had to go to a specialty store selling
higher-end cooking appliances and gadgets.  Lately, I see pizza stones
in Safeway.  So it looks like there is really no reason why one could
not lay their hands on a pizza stone relatively easily?

HR.
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  snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Re: Baking stones
$32 at Williams-Sonoma.

Shaun Ginsbourg wrote:
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Re: Baking stones
Shaun,

Did you get my email? I may have sent it as "reply" rather than "reply
group"

Gordon Hayes

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susceptable



Re: Baking stones

Shaun Ginsbourg wrote:
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I recently had to replace my pizza stone. I have used tiles and stones
for pizza over the past 5-10 years. The advantage of tiles is that they
can cover the entire floor of the oven, providing more room for pizza
and flatbreads. For less than $5.00 at Home Depot I bought the tiles
and even cut pieces to size, to properly cover the area in my oven.

Unglazed quarry tiles are reddish, unpainted, safe for cooking, and in
my experience better than a pizza stone because you get more usable
area and the material is not so "mysterious" as a pizza stone.


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