Proofing bread at home.

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I learned how bakers proof bread at the culinary school today.  I had a
chance to use the big wet warm cabinet called a proofer.  How do you do it
at home?  Do you just wait longer in cooler temperatures or is there some
good way to produce the effects of a proofer in a home kitchen?

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com



Re: Proofing bread at home.

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I don't find that I need a proofer unless I want to speed up the process.
You get better bread with a slow rise in a cool place.  You can rig a
proofing box in a number of ways.  1) put a 11x14 pan of hot water in your
oven, place the dough in a bowl, and close the door.  2) bring a 4 cup
measure of water to a boil in your microwave, put the dough in a bowl, place
in the oven, close the door.  3) Put the dough with a pan of hot water on a
tray and invert a large plastic storage bin over it.  4) put a jug of hot
water in a picnic cooler with the dough and cover.

You get the idea.  You just need a way to trap warm, moist air.  Many newer
ovens have a "proof" setting.  That turns the convection oven on at a
temperature of 100F.  They usually recommend that you add a pan of boiling
water for moisture.



Re: Proofing bread at home.

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it
some
place
a
newer
<snip>
3) Put the dough with a pan of hot water on a
tray and invert a large plastic storage bin over it.

I have a large plastic storage bin to cover my dough to raise.  I'm not sure
what you mean by putting the dough with a pan of hot water on a tray .." I
can't visualize this, can you be a little more specific for me?

thanks
Dee



Re: Proofing bread at home.

"Dee Randall" <deedoveyatshenteldotnet> wrote in message
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a
do
process.
your
on
hot
boiling
sure

OK, by jove, I think I've got it.  I knew there was a solution there for me
as I have a large plastic bread cover-er.
1) Onto a baking tray, set your container of dough; and beside it on the
tray, set  your container of hot water.
2) Cover the tray  with a plastic-bread-cover which covers the whole tray
and sits flush on the table so the heat/moisture will not escape.

Thanks,
Dee


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Re: Proofing bread at home.

"Dee Randall" <deedoveyatshenteldotnet> wrote in message
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had
I
me

Exactly!



Re: Proofing bread at home.
Do you know which ovens go low enough to proof? I'm guessing the gas
oven won't temp that low. Will the Dacor?
Thanks
Kent

Vox Humana wrote:
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Re: Proofing bread at home.

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My JennAir starts at 100F.  My mother's KitchenAid oven has a special proof
setting (as do the newer JennAirs among others) that is programmed at 100F.
My new Sharp Convection/Microwave also has a 100F setting that they
recommend for proofing.  I would imagine that most newer ovens with
electronic controls can be set at 100F.  You can get product information for
Dacor at their website.



Re: Proofing bread at home.
100F is too warm. Yeast likes it at around 80F. Too cold, no rise, too hot
and the some yeast cells die off. What I do is turn my oven on to 200F, for
1 minute, and then turn it off. I have a thermapen that i use to check the
dough temperature, and that's worked for me. My first rise is 2 hours, and
the dough stays close to 80F.

My second rise is 45 minutes, and that's on the counter. I get the bottom
from a plastic storage box (shallow, but large and rectangular), invert it
over the baguettes. Then I take a measuring cup full of boiling water, and
stick it in there. The moisture and heat help the dough rise. The rolls are
laying in a piece of muslin that's been floured and waved to make little
rising beds. I still cover the rolls with plastic wrap though.

A method I learned from _The Best Bread Ever_, is to measure the temperature
of your flour. Take 145F - flour temp = water temp. After mixing in the food
processor, you'll be spot on your target temp (at least in mine). Check your
process and adjust as necessary.

Buy instant yeast instead of active yeast to bypass "activating" your yeast
in warm water. Just mix it with your dry ingredients. Instant yeast contains
very few dead yeasts, unlike active yeast, so you need less of it. I don't
have the conversion factor between the two types with me, but I could look
it up. You can use either in any recipe with the right conversion. Cook's
Illustrated had an article on it. BTW, I got a large brick of instant yeast
at a restaurant supply store for a lot less than those jars in the chain
stores (safeway, albertsons, etc). Must be about 5 or six jars worth. I
filled up a couple of jars, vacuum sealed and refrigerated the rest.

Check out this link:
http://www.gardenguides.com/recipes/thebestbreadever.htm


Happy baking.

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proof
100F.
for



Re: Proofing bread at home.
On 17 Jan 2004 at 2:35, Fred wrote:

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There are lots of ways.... you can cover the bread with oil (a thin film),
saran wrap, or a wet towel and put the bread in a warm place.  The big
goals are to keep the bread from drying out, and then keep it warm.

A good place is in an oven with a pilot light or the oven lamp on.  
Check your temps though, the oven can get too warm.

Some people use sweater boxes as the seal well.  Others use
styrofoam coolers with some hot water in them.... lots of choices
here....

Mike
--
Mike Avery                            
snipped-for-privacy@mail.otherwhen.com
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Re: Proofing bread at home.
When I am forming my bread into loaves or rolls, I turn my oven (gas) till
it just comes on.  Turn it off and turn the light on.  Put my formed dough
in the oven covered by a towel till risen.

--
Helen

Thanks be unto God for His wonderful gift:
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Re: Proofing bread at home.

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Helen, do you have two ovens? I usually put my stone in to heat up 45
minutes before baking.  Do you use this procedure on your second rise as
well?

Thanks,
Dee
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it
some



Re: Proofing bread at home.
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 02:35:55 +0000, Fred wrote:

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I proof my dough by putting the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover it
with saran wrap, and put the bowl on top of my computer monitor. The
inside of the bowl ends up being just the right temp.

During the summer, I'll sometimes put the bowl in sunlight to provide more
even heating.

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I proof my doughnuts at room temperature, and I've seen that it's better
for the dough. Alton Brown claims that you should proof in the fridge, but
I can't say that I agree with that. I've noticed that it leads to uneven
proofing as the dough goes through its temperature change in a rather slow
fashion. Minor point, but for fragile doughs it can be a problem.

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--
-Brian James Macke                     snipped-for-privacy@strangelove.net
    "In order to get that which you wish for, you must first get that which
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Re: Proofing bread at home.

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Thanks for the tips.  I was really concerned about proofing after the loaves
are made up.  The first proofing isn't much of a deal and room temp. seems
fine to me.  The idea of starting and then stopping the oven makes sense.
I'll work with that idea.  In fact I'll make up some dinner rolls at the
store today and test the process in our "consumer kitchen." Take care.

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com



Re: Proofing bread at home.

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it
some
loaves

I tried the oven method today.  I turned the oven on for about a minute and
then shut it off and put a pan of dinner rolls and a pan of baguettes in to
proof.  The proofed product was pretty uneven.  What I mean is that the
baguettes had a lumpy crust as though some little creature was inside trying
to break through in spots and the cloverleaf rolls looked kind of funny.
Nevertheless, everything baked to perfection and the product had perfect
texture and good flavor.  I think the oven might have proofed a little too
fast and, hence, unevenly.  At least the dough was good.  I'll keep
experimenting.

Fred
The Good Gourmet
http://www.thegoodgourmet.com



Re: Proofing bread at home.
wrote:

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Howdy,

It seems that much of this thread is based upon the (false) assumption
that it is best to warm the dough, and therefor accelerate the
proofing process. Generally, cooler, slower proofing yields better
flavor and texture.

All the best,

--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."

Re: Proofing bread at home.
On 17 Jan 2004 at 21:30, Kenneth wrote:

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While that's true, it's often helpful to have a good idea when the bread will be
done, and how well it will have risen.

Controlling the temperature of the dough as well as the temperature and
humidity of the proofing area are big factors in this.


Mike--
Mike Avery                            
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Phone: 970-642-0280
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Burma-Shave




Re: Proofing bread at home.
On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 19:38:38 -0700, "Mike Avery"

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Hi Mike,

On that we agree, but please note how frequently in this thread folks
talk about ways of "warming" the dough. In fact, I don't recall too
many comments about accurately measuring the temperature of the dough
or the surrounding environment.

All the best,

--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."

Re: Proofing bread at home.

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Decided to check the loaf I started this morning.  Room temp is 69.1.
Internal temp of the dough is 72.4.  It doubled in 2 hours just
sitting on the counter in a plastic container with one of the "shower
cap" covers on it.


--
Susan N.

There are 10 types of people in the world.  Those who understand binary and
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Re: Proofing bread at home.

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and those who do not.

You make an excellent point.  The dough itself produces heat as it ferments.
If you were to put the bowl or formed loaves in a poofed up plastic bag or
box or similar, you would be very surprised at the amount of heat and
moisture that is generated.  Once one learns the techniques of making bread
correctly and stops watching the clock, one finds that bread proceeds
rapidly on its own without additional warmth.  A lot of bread is slow to
rise just because it has too much flour or is not kneaded enough.
Janet



Re: Proofing bread at home.

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Did you use a lot of yeast to get it to do this?  I cannot get my dough to
rise in less than 3-4 hours at this temperature.  I never put it in the
refrigerator to rise anymore.  After I take it out of the refrigerator after
and overnight and warm it up, it might take all day to rise, ALWAYS too
darned lated to have bread even that day.  I certainly would love to have
that second overnight rise IN the refrigerator, but I can't get it right.

So I specifically latched on to the above
"In fact, I don't recall too
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thanks,
Dee






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