What is an "egg" actually doing in a flour recipe (onion rings) anyway?

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My kid and I am just learning how to cook, and I keep seeing these  
recipes that call for "an egg".  
 


For example, we were making onion rings today and found this:
http://www.bhg.com/recipes/how-to/cooking-basics/how-to-make-onion-rings/

Seems to me, except for the seasoning, the egg & milk aren't  
any better or worse than equivalent amounts of water ... but  
maybe I'm missing something.

QUESTION: What 'does' the egg actually do in these recipes?


Re: What is an "egg" actually doing in a flour recipe (onion rings) anyway?
My kid and I am just learning how to cook, and I keep seeing these  
recipes that call for "an egg".  
 


For example, we were making onion rings today and found this:
http://www.bhg.com/recipes/how-to/cooking-basics/how-to-make-onion-rings/

Seems to me, except for the seasoning, the egg & milk aren't  
any better or worse than equivalent amounts of water ... but  
maybe I'm missing something.

QUESTION: What 'does' the egg actually do in these recipes?


Re: What is an "egg" actually doing in a flour recipe (onion rings) anyway?
My kid and I am just learning how to cook, and I keep seeing these  
recipes that call for "an egg".  
 


For example, we were making onion rings today and found this:
http://www.bhg.com/recipes/how-to/cooking-basics/how-to-make-onion-rings/

Seems to me, except for the seasoning, the egg & milk aren't  
any better or worse than equivalent amounts of water ... but  
maybe I'm missing something.

QUESTION: What 'does' the egg actually do in these recipes?


Re: What is an "egg" actually doing in a flour recipe (onion rings) anyway?
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hg.com/recipes/how-to/cooking-basics/how-to-make-onion-ri...
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You only have to ask one.

The egg is a binder.   It causes the flour to stick to whatever is
dipped in the egg wash.   Ever tried to get egg off a plate.  It's
like glue.
That's it's purpose.

Re: What is an "egg" actually doing in a flour recipe (onion rings) anyway?
On Tue, 14 May 2013 16:23:04 -0700, ImStillMags wrote:

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OK. Makes sense we'd want glue, since we're trying to get  
the flour to stick to the otherwise slippery onion rings.

A) The egg is a gluey binder.

PS: Sorry for the duplicate posts; I wrote to the aioe server
admin Paolo, to see if he can debug why that happens. I'll use
a different server that doesn't hiccup so much.


Re: What is an "egg" actually doing in a flour recipe (onion rings) anyway?

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The egg shell, if you are using it, would add crunch, I suppose.  I would  
recommend against it.

You don't need to use egg, but it provides some volume.  Tenpura batter has  
no egg (look it up).  You can also just dust the onion rings with flour for  
a different end result.  



Re: What is an "egg" actually doing in a flour recipe (onion rings) anyway?
On Tue, 14 May 2013 17:31:13 -0700, Pico Rico wrote:

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OK. I guess the egg would provide more volume than,  
say, water.

PS: Sorry for the duplicate posts; I wrote to the aioe server
admin Paolo, to see if he can debug why that happens. I'll use
a different server for this response.


Re: What is an "egg" actually doing in a flour recipe (onion rings) anyway?
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ld
 has
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 for
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I.e., your egg batter will puff up more than just plain water.  Here's
mine - it's really good - you may need to add beer to the batter if it
gets too thick.

1 large onion
2 1/4 C. flour
1 tsp. baking powder
tsp. salt
20-24 oz. room temperature beer

Cut the rings and put them in ice water for at least 3 hours (use ice
cubes and water, and put the container in the fridge).

Oil temp should be at least 375 deg.  F.  - in my big electric frypan,
400 worked better because I cut the rings fairly thin.

Drain the rings and shake them in a bag of flour until they're well-
coated.  Submerse in the beer batter and drop in the oil.  Fry until
light brown, turning once.  Keep warm on a rack on a cookie sheet in
the oven - salt just before serving.

I don't like to put them on paper towel, because the grease kind of
soaks back in - so I put out a cookie sheet with a small cooling rack
on top, and load the onion rings on that to drain and dry - keep the
oven about 200 or so (warm).

N.

Re: What is an "egg" actually doing in a flour recipe (onion rings) anyway?

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The egg is the binder.  Not all recipes call for egg but most will call for  
egg and milk.  There are different ways to make onion rings.  Note that I  
have never actually made them but there are some allergen free (top 8) ones  
that use neither wheat, egg or dairy.  



Re: What is an "egg" actually doing in a flour recipe (onion rings) anyway?
Danny D wrote:

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Schoolin' sure am useful.



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