Digitizing a logo

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My older DD's birthday is coming up.  I got a copy of her
web site logo and digitized it, then embroidered it on white
cotton twill so I can make her a custom apron.  This shows
some of the steps for digitizing and sewing out a two-color
design:
http://ickes.us/SKSLogo.aspx

--
Beverly
http://ickes.us/default.aspx



Re: Digitizing a logo


On Sat, 14 Aug 2010 16:53:22 -0700, BEI Design wrote:

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Gee. You mean you can't just put a picture in the sewing machine and have
it stitch out the design? :-)

It's often difficult to explain to people that they need some software
that will convert an image into an embroidery design. It's just as
difficult to explain to them that it's not an instant process:  they
first have to take some time to learn how to use the software.

gwh


Re: Digitizing a logo


Wayne Hines wrote:
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LOL!!!  I read the manual which came with the software
backwards and forwards several times.  It was written in a
language-other-than-English, probably Greek, and translated
by someone who was apparently not fluent in either.  To say
it was confusing is an understatement.

I finally bought a few commercially digitized designs and
loaded them in the software, then watched how they sewed out
'virtually' a bunch of times.  That led to several "ah-ha"
moments, and helped me to figure out the sequence of laying
in stitches plus when and how to use various tools and
settings.

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Indeed!  My software comes with a "magic" tool, which is
worthless.  It's easier in the long run to select a tool and
manually input the points.  I bought my embroidery machine 6
years ago, and added the software about a year later.  It
took me at least another year, by trial and error, to feel
confident in creating original designs.  And I still do a
practice stitch-out before committing to the real item,
because invariably there are a few tweaks required to get it
right.

--
Beverly
http://ickes.us/default.aspx



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