only slightly OT: tunisian crochet

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We were discussing Tunisian crochet/afghan stitch awhile ago. I was
intrigued by a project I saw on "Knitting and Crochet Today" on PBS some
months ago, but had trouble finding a reasonably priced HUGE Tunisian
crochet needle. Well, I finally got one and am ready to get started. And
in a serendipitous spot of synchronicity (say THAT ten times!), the show
was repeated last week - just the second time I ever tuned in! (Usually
it's a disappointment when that happens, but not this time).

So last weekend I struggled with figuring out the stitch, and gave up.
Today I looked at online tutorials, with the intention to start over
again tonight. And the light just went on --- click! -- Tunisian crochet
is rather like horizontal stitching, rather than the normal "vertical"
approach! The stitches are formed side-to-side rather than up-and-down. AHA!

It should be easier when I start over later today! <VBG>

Sue


--
Susan Hartman/Dirty Linen
The Magazine of Folk and World Music
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Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet

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Think of the stitch like an attached chain stitch.  Stick needle in stitch
and pull up a loop. Hold  loop on needle and repeat pull up a stitch and
hold on needle in next stitch.

When all the stitches are on the needle proceed to put yarn over needle and
pull through first stitch, then second stitch and on and on.

I'm not sure my rather simple explanation will help, but I'm certain you
will get comfortable with it after a couple of tries.

Enjoy!

Lucille



Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet
I have a photo and text tutorial which includes how to cross stitch on
the ground.  If that's of interest, it's here:
http://heritageshoppe.com/heritage/stitches/tunisian.html

You might also enjoy another page, which includes a baby afghan of my
design.  http://heritageshoppe.com/heritage/essays/tunisian.html

I wish it would make a huge comeback and that loads of designers would
get involved as they did in the 50s, 60s, and 70s.  Such gorgeous stuff.
  And for those who love cross stitch, another medium on which to make
their crosses.

Dianne



Susan Hartman wrote:
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Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet

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Lucille





Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet
That is so tempting Dianne. I really want to try Tunisian but am so busy
with every thing else.
Cheryl
On 5/29/08 1:09 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@mid.individual.net, "Dianne

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Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet

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Just my opinion, but I think Tunisian crochet is possibly amongst the top
ten boring crochet stitches, even when you do specialty stitches like
bobbles and X's.

It does make a nice surface for cross stitch and it's more like a fabric
when it's done then most other knits or crochets, but it's just the same
thing over and over and over and ------------------.

L



Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet
Lucille wrote:

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    It's true it's boring, but I really like the finished
product--especially for baby blankets so one doesn't have all
the little holes to trap little fingers and toes.  Plus, of
course, it makes a deliciously warm blanket for cold nights.

Best wishes,
Ericka

Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet
Ericka Kammerer wrote:
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I have to agree with Ericka.  Yes, you can think of it as boring, or you
can think of it as soothing repetition.  Not any more or less repetitive
than cross stitches or needlepoint (although in either one there can be
some interesting additional embroidery).  And too many knitted and
crocheted baby blankets aren't "fit" for a baby - too many holes to trap
tiny fingers.

But is it any more boring than a ripple afghan or granny squares?  Once
you know a pattern, whether it's knitting or crocheting, you pretty much
just keep repeating it over and over.  :~)

I will admit wholeheartedly that the ground is boring.  But it wasn't
just meant to be plain.  It was meant to be embellished in some manner.
  Though not always.  In which case it was meant to be warm.  Remember
coal furnaces or simply fireplaces?

It works up fairly quickly.  The tedious part is the embroidery on top.
  The ground is sufficient so that you can do surface embroidery and not
be limited to cross stitch.

By the way:  did you know you can make it look like knitting?  There's a
ton of different patterns you can make which I was unaware of until I
borrowed an old book from the local library.  That book has since
disappeared and I would love to have it again.

Dianne

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Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet

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Since you mentioned it, I think ripple stitch and granny squares are boring
as well.  That's why I did the kind of knitted afghan I have pictured in my
album on the RCTNP site instead of something simple like that.

As far as coal furnaces, when I lived where a coal furnace was used it was
in a small apartment house and I was a little kid.  At the age of 7 or 8, I
wasn't ever really cold and ran around with an open coat and no hat in the
dead of winter.  Again, in a city apartment I had no fireplace so I can't
relate to that.

I'm going to look and see if I still have a book that has the specialty
stitches for afghan stitch.  As I mentioned in my other note, I remember
doing bobbles and crossed stitches and lots of cables, but I doubt I can
remember any of the instructions now unless I find the pattern.

I remember a Hippie styled vest that I made in the 60's (or was it the 70's)
that had strips of afghan stitch with Navaho cross stitch embroidery, open
stringy stripes and lots of fringe on the edges.  Think Cher when she was
young and singing with Sonny.

It's hard to believe that it was considered gorgeous at the time because it
certainly doesn't reflect my tastes nowadays.

Lucille



Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet
Lucille wrote:
  > Since you mentioned it, I think ripple stitch and granny squares are
boring
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Lucille, you really made me laugh out loud.  Your story was wonderful!
And your comments well received.  I never liked the styles of the late
60s and 70s.  Was extremely relieved when nice things came back in the
80s.  I went to Hallmark headquarters sometime in the mid 80s and it was
mind boggling as they showed the art decade to decade from the time they
started.  Really ugly stuff during those "hippie" years.  IMNSHO, I
think we're in a half nice half ugly stuff at present.  I didn't like
some of the fashions of the 40s and early 50s either.  Jacqueline
Kennedy and a few actresses like Audrey Hepburn brought back some chic
for a few seconds.  :~)
Dianne



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Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet
On Sat, 31 May 2008 17:18:33 -0500, Dianne Lewandowski


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I don't know why Jacqueline Kennedy who had huge, narrow feet always
wore white/light coloured shoes that accentuated it, fashion blunder.
Spare me the pill box hats too !

Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet
lucretia borgia wrote:

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I never paid attention to her shoes or hats.  It was her impeccable
clothing and style that added to our American culture.

Dianne

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Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet

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Can you explain to me how you can separate her shoes and hats from her
style.  As I recall it, her hats were always a major news item, along with
her sunglasses and her flip hairdo.  They were also an important part of the
museum collection I went to see in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New
York.

As to her impeccable clothing, I used to see her walking with Caroline along
1st Avenue in Manhattan pushing a baby stroller and dressed in jeans and
T-shirts and sneakers, with a hooded sweatshirt over her shoulders.  I will
grant you her jeans probably cost more then mine, but they still were blue
denim jeans.

As far as American culture is concerned, every fashion trend for as long as
people documented fashion lent something to the culture of the time.  You
may not like the style but it still became part of history.

.Lucille




Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet
Lucille wrote:

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All of that may be true.  But *I* looked at her clothes.  The kind she
wore for affairs of state.  Classy lady . . . even in jeans.

Dianne
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Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet
On Sat, 31 May 2008 22:16:58 -0500, Dianne Lewandowski

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She should have looked classy with what was spent on her clothes but
how 'classy' was she when she married Onassis ?  YUCK !

Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet
Dianne Lewandowski wrote:
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As they say, if you remember the 60s, you weren't really part of it.

And if you thought the artwork was ugly, you weren't stoned enough!  :)


--
Karen C - California
Editor/Proofreader www.IntlProofingConsortium.com

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Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet
On 5/31/08 11:39 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@mid.individual.net, "Karen C

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I've heard that turn of phrase before and it makes me laugh every time.


Back in the early 80's, I  had an apartment that had nearly psychedelic
wallpaper in the "living room". (paisleys in greens and golds). It was
picked out by the landlord's mother who was in her 80s. They both thought is
was very elegant. But then again, the dining room was Victorian Brothel -
dark panel wainscoting and red flocked wallpaper.


C


Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet
On Sun, 01 Jun 2008 06:52:08 -0400, Cheryl Isaak
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It was the mens 'leisure suits' - mostly polyester - that sent me
nuts.

OT silly fashion WAS Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet
On 6/1/08 7:51 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,

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Sputter, sputter, spew!

There is a gentleman of my acquaintance that loved his leisure suits. After
all, they were comfortable, washable and lasted 30 years already. What more
did could he want????  His wife was unraveling them as she dared. The lime
green one was the last to go.


I understand he was haunting vintage shops for more....
------

The current fashion that drives me nuts are the cropped cardigans.

Cheryl


Re: OT silly fashion WAS Re: only slightly OT: tunisian crochet
On Sun, 01 Jun 2008 08:03:10 -0400, Cheryl Isaak

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Lime green ???

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