OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....

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When removing your car key from the ignition at -j40 something C, do not put
it in your mouth, no matter how many parcels you have to pick up.
It sticks to your tongue.

Dawne, who just found this out



Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....
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DAWNE!!!!!!  You oughta know better than *that*!!!!!  At least it's in
a place that will shortly thaw the key out without causing pain.  Or
did you not wait?

Commiserating in the cold (currently -14F, on our way to
-20something),
Joan

Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....

"Joan E."  wrote
 "Dawne  wrote:
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DAWNE!!!!!!  You oughta know better than *that*!!!!!  At least it's in
a place that will shortly thaw the key out without causing pain.  Or
did you not wait?

Joan

yes, the key thawed very quickly in my mouth--but I thought it was very
funny! Who would have thought the key would get THAT cold in the ignition
during a fairly short drive????
Dawne



Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....

"Jangchub" <>>"Joan E."  wrote
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No, but from your comment I am apparently doomed to live some of it.
It is sooooo cold, but at least Joan, andFred, and I have roofs over our
heads and light and heat.

Dawne



Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....
Dawne Peterson wrote:
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Yes - it's definitely something to be grateful for.  I was watching CBC
and they were doing a report on the homeless in places like Edmonton and
in Vancouver.  In some ways it is worse in Vancouver, because they are
just not prepared for the extreme cold temps.

It was 8C here yesterday, and it is -4C today so we are relatively well
off.  I went for a walk to the post office, and to pick up the paper,
and really enjoyed the briskness.

MargW

Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....
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See?  That's what's great about living in the north....we *know* how
to insulate!  Against both cold *and* heat! :)

Joan

Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....

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Contrary to what you seem to think, houses built a hundred years ago
in the East weren't insulated either.


Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....
On 12/19/08 2:45 PM, in article
snipped-for-privacy@n21g2000vba.googlegroups.com,

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Some were in a sense, with largish (6 to 8 inch) air pockets. Just not most
homes. And it did depend on where you were. My grandmother spent many moons
researching home building practices while on the local (Millis MA)
historical society. Many it was the better off families that built the homes
with the air pocket insulation. They also used milkweed (kapok) and
newspapers.

C


Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....
On Fri, 19 Dec 2008 16:22:03 -0500, Cheryl Isaak

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Seaweed was the insulation of choice around NS.  Unfortunately it
dried and dropped down and was not very effective.

Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....
wrote:
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This house has air-pocket construction, but the house I lived in in
Ohio was of the same vintage (1880-1890) and the plaster was laid
right on the bricks.  Burrrrrrrrr!

Elizabeth (not convinced those air-pockets do all that much).

Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....
snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com wrote:
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I remember my father explaining to me as a child that they would build a
double brick wall with a space between them. That was for insulation
purposes. There were some metal tie thingies between the two walls,I
remember. Dad was an architect, a chartered surveyor and a civil
engineer; he could design anything...but never never ask him to hammer a
nail into the wall, or change a fuse. Mum had to do that!

Gillian

Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....
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Yeah, but double brick walls with a pocket would have had much deeper
window  and door frames than this house had.  I'm positive it was a
single brick wall with the plaster laid right on.

Elizabeth

Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....

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Air is a pretty good insulator.  Metal thingies for structure so that the 2
walls move in tandem rather than shifting apart under differing load
conditions - which could lead to roof issues, etc.  Lots of engineers or
architects can do the math, but not the hands-on stuff.  Personally, I
always value my techs greatly, as they are often the opposite - can do the
great hands-on, but not necessarily the details of the math (though they
will know what does or doesn't work in fabrication).  Always knew to ask for
help, advice, how to - that's how I learned to use a bunch of interesting,
tools.  And got my work done when needed by the machine shop - being happy
to admit my errors!

Ellice


Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....
Gillian Murray wrote:
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I also studied architecture for a year (before I dropped out) and one of
the things I do remember vividly was going onto sites with a builder
every week.  The walls at that stage were built, as you say, with a gap
between the two layers of bricks with little metal strips between each
wall.  These strips has a kink in them, which would be placed facing
downwards, in order for moisture to drip down and not seep through the
next layer of bricks.  This was done mainly on south-facing walls (we're
in the southern hemisphere) an possibly isn't done at all any more, as
standards have dropped.  I'm sure it served as insulation too.

Air pockets are better insulation than anything solid, as heat is
transmitted slower through air than through solid material.  Probably
the houses insulated with seaweed were done like that deliberately, as
making a small gap is not as easy as no gap at all, and the seaweed
disintegrating would serve that purpose.

We don't have quite the same need for insulation as people in Canada,
but our temperature did go down to -9C this year.  And since the time
when a dog jumped through TWO of my windows in two different rooms, and
took out not only the window pane but the frame as well, I've kind of
been living outdoors!!  Or it's felt like it.

Catherine

Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....
On 12/20/08 1:53 PM, in article
snipped-for-privacy@m2g2000vbp.googlegroups.com,

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In theory they do. In practice, I'm with you.

C


Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....
snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com wrote:


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My 1895 Ohio house was a frame house, with lath and plaster inside but
no insulation.  Fortunately the millwork around doors and windows was
pretty deep, so as we gradually remodeled it, we simply added a layer of
half-inch drywall all through the inside.  Worked like a charm.  Of
course, back then the blown-in insulation was very new, not very
reliable and had a lot of fumes which we thought would NOT be good for
our small children.

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans.

Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....
snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com wrote:
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 >
Many houses built here in Ontario -- ie, part of the Great White North
where today it's about -22 C with the windchill -- in the mid 1950s
weren't insulated, likely because heating oil was relatively inexpensive
in those days.

Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....

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Whine, whine, whine... try living somewhere with real weather with no
insulation in the walls.

Elizabeth - from her unheated, uninsulated, third floor.

Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....
On 12/19/08 2:43 PM, in article
snipped-for-privacy@n21g2000vba.googlegroups.com,

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You haven't add the insulation up there yet girl! good thing there are no
pipes there


Re: OT Things you would not learn if the weather were not 40something below C....
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Can't blow in insulation on the third floor the way the roof hits the
kneewall.  Haven't gutted all the rooms yet, so only some are
insulated.  Pipes don't seem to care, though, since the first and
second floors weren't insulated the first few years we lived here and
the pipes (which run up the outside wall of the kitchen) never froze -
even when we didn't bother to heat the first floor.

Elizabeth

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