heat n bond or steam a seam?

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Good morning everyone

Here I am again with a question.

I will be embarking on an applique project to make a baby quilt for a
friend of mine (as soon as she tells me she's pregnant!). I have found
the perfect quilt patten for her (teddy's playhouse) but it involves
applique (Lots and lots and lots). So this gives you an idea of how
special this friend is to me, as some of you may remember me saying
that I really REALLY don't like applique!.

So here's my question; which is better/which shoul I use, heat n bond
or steam a seam???
Preferences? Why?

It makes no difference to me; I will have to buy whichever online so
hit me with the recommendations!

Thanks

Claudia

Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


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I've tried various fusibles, but prefer steam a seam lite (or is it
light?). You have to sew the edges down - but I'd be doing that on a
babyquilt anyway.

I prefer it because, it works like it says on the package: I've never
had a problem getting it to stick (starched fabric or not), and it
doesn't leave residue on my needle.

I've used it for lettering on towels that went to soccer practise and
games until the towel fell apart and no problem.

And it is not stiff on the quilt after.

HTH
Hanne in DK

Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


I actually prefer Wonder Under -- but I would suggest on any of the larger
pieces you do the following regardless of which brand you select.

1)  Trace your piece onto the fusible.
2)  Cut out 1/8" on the OUTSIDE of your drawn line.
3)  Cut out 1/8" to 1/4" on the INSIDE of your drawn line.
4)  Then fuse to you fabric.

By leaving a bit of the fusible on the OUTSIDE of your drawn line -- when
you cut out your appliqué piece -- you will be certain to have fusible all
the way to the edge of your piece.

By removing the fusible from the center of your appliqué piece -- you will
remove the "heaviness" that you sometimes have with fusibles.  It will not
only make the quilt softer -- but easier to quilt if you plan to do any
quilting inside your appliqué pieces (I usually do an outline or an  echo or
something like that on the larger pieces.)

I've done many fusible appliqué quilts.  The early ones I didn't remove the
"inner fusible" on the pieces and they are still a bit stiff.  The more
recent quilts have it removed... and they are nice and soft and huggable!

--
Kate in MI
http://community.webshots.com/user/K_Groves



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Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


And, whichever you choose, do read the instructions.  ( I realize full well
that reading instructions is totally unnatural).  The iron temp and whether
to keep moving or don't move make a heap of difference in your success.
Polly


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Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


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echo or

Kate, I think I'm getting your instructions.  Does that mean that you
are left with maybe 1/2" of fusible just going around the edge then?
Nothing in the middle of the applique?  I have a sheep applique quilt
on my 'to do' list and will have to try that method.  Donna

Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


I love Misty Fuse. I've had nothing but trouble with Wonder Under
(regardless of whether I read/follow instructions or not). Steam a
Seam is fine, but I still like Misty Fuse better. There is now a new
form of Misty Fuse that won't react to UV rays and so you can be
assured that it will never darken inside a project someday far in the
future when a careless heir leaves the quilt hanging in bright
sunlight.

Sunny

Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


Love the 'regardless of whether I follow the instructions or not' Sunny.
I bought a mess of Misty Fuse but never used it yet.  I have had really good
luck with the heat and bond lite over the years.  Has to be lite.
I got ahold of some of the 'not lite" (can't remember what it is called)
and ruined a small project.
Taria
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Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


Hmmmm

I've used it for years and years and never had a lick of trouble.  HOT
iron -- and how long I press it never seemed to make a difference.  There
are a few that say silk setting for 1-2 seconds or something like that.  I
can never seem to get those to stick.

Guess buy (or borrow a swatch from friends) and try a few different ones and
see what works best for you!



--
Kate in MI
http://community.webshots.com/user/K_Groves



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Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


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Thanks, Kate.  I can't wait to try your technique.  Donna

Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


Yes, Donna -- just an "empty picture frame" that you press to the wrong side
of your fabric.  When you cut out your appliqué piece -- you will have a
"frame" of fusible around the perimeter of your piece.

--
Kate in MI
http://community.webshots.com/user/K_Groves



We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


I've found that Misty Fuse is good for not making things stiff, but it's
standard version comes without a backing, so it's not easy to copy
applique templates on to it, there are instructions on the pack and
various methods online, you definitely need an applique pressing sheet
and it's a fuss, but less fuss than all the stitching which you have to
do for almost every method!

It also doesn't gum up your needle, but I haven't had that problem with
other fusibles that I've tried, but then I've generally only done one
block at a time.

Cheers
Anne

Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


Do NOT use Heat'n'Bond Ultra if you plan to stitch through it. It is
made ONLY for non-stitched appliqué. I would not recommend using it on
anything that will get used like a baby quilt might. I have had good
results with Heat'n'Bond Lite and Steam-a-Seam 2. The nice thing about
Steam-a-Seam 2 is that it is a little sticky without fusing so it can be
  stuck down and easily re-positioned until it is fused.

Julia in MN

claudia wrote:
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Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


I like Soft Fuse, a product from Stacy Michell, Marty's daughter.  It's just
like Misty Fuse, but with paper backing.  I am traditional in that I like
having the paper backing.  I had trouble with Misty Fuse, and like having
the paper to draw my design on first....

Nancy


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Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


Will you be using machine appliqué? Have you decided on the stitch? I like
the look of the blanket stitch appliqué, but the satin stitch is pretty too.
The latter may be the best choice for a sturdy baby quilt.
Pat in Virginia

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Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


Oops.  Pat in VA saw it and I didn't.  No opinion from me about which
fusible is best but I do have heaps of experience with baby quilt appliqué.
Every time it is reasonably possible do it double.  That is -
    take 2 pieces of the fabric placed face-to-face, stitch around, clip,
slash and turn.
    If the appliqué piece is so wee like maybe eyeballs on a gnat, you
can't, of course.
    All you have to do with a faced and turned appliqué piece is glue stick
it in place and blanket stitch around.
    When I made a 'bunny sleeping on the moon' quilt for my doctor's new
baby that is the method I used.  Dr says that quilt has 'attached' and has
been washed at least twice a week for a year.  Not even the bunny's tail
(which is a Minkee appliqué) has given up.
    Frankly, I thought the moon looked more like 'bunny sleeping on a
banana' but her baby loves it.
    If you're doing a Baltimore for Paducah, this method is probably
primitive; for a baby quilt - a really best method.  Polly



"Pat in Virginia"
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Re: heat n bond or steam a seam?


If you use a very light weight fusible interfacing for the back, you can
simply fuse the appliqué in place & skip the glue stick. Put the fusible
side of the interfacing to the right side of the appliqué fabric,
stitch, clip, slash, and turn. Then fuse to the background fabric and
stitch it down.

Julia in MN

Polly Esther wrote:
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