How far is TOO far?

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First, please check out this link-

www.starforestquilts.com

Pat on her hill sent the link to me.  The quilts are fabulous- just
gorgeous, BUT.... how far is too far???  I would be happier with
calling these "quilts" if the scenes in the quilts were of fabric and
appliqued.  I would greatly admire the maker for searching out just the
right fabrics and turning and manipulating the fabrics to make a scene
of this magnitude and intricacy.  I realize searching out a beautiful
scene and photographing it properly is an art in itself, but..... is it
what we generally think of as making a quilt top?  Running fabric thru
a computer- is *that* making a quilt top?

I appreciate the quiltmakers who stretch their quiltmaking to the
limits and are always looking for something new and different.  But at
the same time I have a problem with using printing and painting and
some other techniques.  For me quiltmaking means piecing or appliquing-
with fabric- a quilt should have pictures that are appliqued if you
want a face or a flower or a scene- not printed or painted.  (I know
"embellishments" have been around forever- where do you draw the
line???)  Painting a flower on a piece of fabric and then quilting it
just doesn't seem like a "quilt" to me- altho if it has the layers and
the quilt stitching, I guess it's technically a type of whole cloth
quilt.  And some fabric artists take raggedy chunks of fabric and toss
them together and call that a quilt- it's just not what I expect in a
"quilt".

*IF* you were The Honorary Quilt Police for a day how would you define
"A Quilt"?  What would be a process or "substance" which would put it
over the edge?  What are the basic "requirements" to define a
"quilt"???  Where does quiltmaking end and "textile artist" begin?

Leslie & The Furbabies in MO.


Re: How far is TOO far?
Well, I like whole cloth quilts and it seems this is another kind of
those.

Yes, people who make quilts like this probably get credit for amazing
piecing from those who don't know any better.  But heck, they don't know
any better.

Did you know Carol Bryer Fallert won a prize in miniature quilts at
Paducah for a quilt like these?  Picture and description is in the
current AQS magazine.  Seems quilt judges must be ok with it.

Is it my favorite thing?  Nope.  Will I make one?  Unlikely.  I like the
piecing and applique so this doesn't thrill me.  If I were to do a whole
cloth, it would be to show off the quilting and that's hard to do with
printed fabric like these.

marcella


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Re: How far is TOO far?
I have been going through the same debate in my own mind- at Paducah, there
was a beautiful "quilt" of (I think) a gigantic chickadee that was painted
on the fabric and then quilted. It just didn't seem like a "quilt" to me,
although a person pointed out to me that it wasn't all that much different
than a whole cloth quilt, just with the added bit of the painting.


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  Painting a flower on a piece of fabric and then quilting it
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Re: How far is TOO far?
It looks to me like all she does is create her own fabrics by printing
her photos onto them. That is kinda interesting and certainly creative,
but I don't like the quilts, they give me a headache just looking at them.

I always say if it can't keep my butt warm, it is not a quilt, but I
guess that is a bit too old fashioned a view. I recently looked through
a magazine "for today's quilters" and suddenly I felt old. ;)

Hugs,

Maria





--

Maria Cherry
remove the penguins
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Re: How far is TOO far?
Now, wait.  If I were to accept the position of Honorary Quilt Police for a
day, first we have to decide what my goal is.  Will I be motivated to
encourage the buying of stuff such as fabric pens, paint and embroidery
machines?  Do we define quilt as a wrap for a homeless or ill child?  Got to
have some guidelines here before I even consider the job. Naaah.  Forget it.
I think it's cheating to use a pen on a quilt, if only to draw eyelashes or
tendrils.  On the other hand, I think painting happy eyes on cat faces is
perfectly acceptable.   How sweet it is not to have to make any sense at
all.  Polly

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Re: How far is TOO far?
Don't think it is too old-fashioned at all.  My dictionary states a quilt
is "a bedcover made of two layers of cloth filled with down, cotton, wool,
etc. and stitched together in lines or patterns to keep the filling in
place."  Bedcover.  To me, that is what a quilt is.  Something to use on
the bed and to be washed over and over would not need embellishments and
I'm sure if any ink was on a quilt it was because it was spilled.

There is a difference in a quilt and something that is quilted.  To me a
quilt (noun) goes on a bed, anything else is a quilted (adjective) wall
hanging, quilted clothing, quilted art, but not "a quilt".  A quilt belongs
on a bed and is made to keep people warm.  Can you see the pioneer women
making quilted art when their families needed quilts to keep them warm
during winters when the wind whistled through the cracks in the plank
walls?

That said, I've seen some quilted articles that were absolutely gorgeous,
intricate, and intriguing.  I can fully understand anyone who would want to
make one (or two or dozens) of them and they require great skill.  Yet, if
they don't go on a bed they are quilted art, not a quilt.  Both have a
place in our lives, but shouldn't be mistaken for each other.

Maria in NC wrote:

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--
Toledo,Ohio


Re: How far is TOO far?
A quilt is defined as layers of fabric, usually with batting between, held
together by lines of stitching going through all layers. So these qualify as
quilts. And IMO they are pretty amazing.

I once saw a photo of a quilt by a Japanese designer who first pieced
something quite intricate and finished quilting it. Then she photographed
that quilt and printed onto fabric. Then cut up the photo fabric and pieced
another quilt out of that.

Most photo quilts by the average quiltmaker IMO are about as enjoyable as
looking at somebody's vacation pictures. The ones on this site challenge the
mind. Wish I could do as well!
Roberta in D

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Re: How far is TOO far?
I don't know if I have the quilting "chops" to comment, but here goes
anyway.....
I love some of the art quilts and wish fervantly that someday I will
develop the artistic sensibility and skills to create something even
vaguely artistic. I also love traditional quilts with gazillions of
matching points (groan......) and the look that has been handed down
for generations.
As a beginning quilter, what I feel even more strongly is "long-arm
fear". I was watching a quilting show about some new development in
long arm quilters and the interviewer turned to the camera and said
something like: "this is going to reverberate through the quilting
community. Judges can't help but sit up and take notice of this and you
can be certain that future quilters who want to be winners will adopt
this technology." I realize they were selling a product, but there is
something of truth in that spiel. Even here in my little town, the
quilts that do the "best" in shows are either hand quilted (not even
remotely possible because of my fingers) or long arm quilted. I will
never afford a long arm and I can't even afford to send my quilts out
to be done by somebody else -- besides, isn't it supposed to be MY work
if I enter it as MY quilt? And if it's judged on the quality of MY
work, then why should the amazing work only possible on a long arm
quilter be considered?
I realize I probably don't know what I'm talking about, but I have
friends who are also novice quilters who talk about this same topic. We
all feel we will never be able to aspire to quilty recognition until
one of us wins the lottery and buys a long arm quilter. ;)

sorry, I realize this went way off topic and became a rant. I promise
not to do t his too often.
Sunny
Roberta Zollner wrote:
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Long Arm vs Regular SM WAS Re: How far is TOO far?
Sunny: I know what you mean!! My guild
has a challenge every year. This year, I
am the challenge co-diva with another
member. WE two set the rules. This time
our categories include SOLO projects:
ONE person ONLY; and TEAM projects: more
than one person, ALL of whom must be
GUILD MEMBERS. We feel this will 'level
the playing field' for those who do ALL
the work alone. You might suggest these
categories to your group.
PAT in VA/USA

S wrote:
...cut...
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Re: Long Arm vs Regular SM WAS Re: How far is TOO far?
$5Z.176769@dukeread02:

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Pat, I'm curious... and not to take Leslie's thread too far off track...
but are there any limitations to keep someone from joining your guild by
paying dues, but not really showing up or participating until it came
time to show?  And no I'm not planning on doing that.... but as I've
mentioned previously, I really enjoy the smaller guild shows... the ones
just held in the basements of churches with no juding, just the love of
quilting.. but lately those have changed dramatically.  We went to one
about 5 months ago where the majority of the quilts were quilted by the
same person, same design, but not even bound yet... just a little sign
saying "under construction"  And it was really pretty clear that they
were done on a computer guided thing too...... so.... not being a member
of a guild, I'm just curious if there is something to maybe say uhm...
well.... protect the integrity? of the smaller guild shows?  That sounds
kind of snooty and quilt police like I realize, but .... well..  I
sincerely hate to see them look like walmart quilts......not that the
piecing wasn't spectacular.. but.. still....


--
Jan
RCTQ Coffee Diva

Re: Long Arm vs Regular SM WAS Re: How far is TOO far?
Jan: The guild has over 300 members,
IIRC. Some attend all/most meetings,
some attend some, some attend none. So,
the answer to your question: yes, a
person could join but not be active.
This challenge, btw, is NOT a show. The
finished projects will be displayed at
both chapter meetings in September. Only
PPQG (guild) members at the meeting will
vote, one vote per member. We do not
have judges. Prizes are not huge
FYI: this year the theme is:
"PPQG Celebrates Virginia: 1607-2007" in
honor of the birthday celebration that
will commence in October.
PAT in VA/USA

Jan wrote:

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Re: Long Arm vs Regular SM WAS Re: How far is TOO far?

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Thanks!  It sounds wonderful!  And like you have a fun, well organized
crew!  I'm looking forward to the day when I'm not such a valuable
commodity around here and I can sneak off and play  more ;-)

--
Jan
RCTQ Coffee Diva

Guild members Re: Long Arm vs Regular SM WAS Re: How far is TOO far?
Our guild has a member who is a nationally recognized quilter. She is a
member for the workshops we hold. (I know because she told me) She does not
participate in the guild, except to attend workshops and classes we offer
(at a pittance!). As far as I can tell, she has not held office or served on
a committee. She's a Taker, not a Giver. What can we do? Nothing, I guess.
Knowing this side of her did really change how I felt about her as a quilt
artist, tho.

--
Wendy
http://griffinsflight.com/Quilting/quilt1.htm
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Re: Guild members Re: Long Arm vs Regular SM WAS Re: How far is TOO far?
Wendy: We have members who have not held
office or served on a committee. Some
have never even done white glove duty.
Other people contribute often and
generously of their time and talents. To
paraphrase an old 80/20 maxim: "80% of
the work is done by 20% of the members"
Every social or service club is like
this. I just try not to let it bug me.
I'm cool with my own contributions.
PAT in VA/USA

frood wrote:
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Re: Guild members Re: Long Arm vs Regular SM WAS Re: How far is TOO far?
Yeah, I know. And the ones who don't help are usually the ones who complain
the loudest about how things are done! Harumph. I love my guild, and I want
to help out so it continues to be an organization I'm proud to be a part of.
(ok, Grammar Police, sorry about that sentence!)

--
Wendy
http://griffinsflight.com/Quilting/quilt1.htm
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Guild members 80% and 20% grammar
On behalf's of the Grammar's Police, you apology are accept with
stiperlation.  First, you are go write on  blackboard's 100 times, "I be not
using proposition to end sentence's with."   Polly  (That was such fun I may
do it again some time.  Bet it just curdles our Pats.)

"frood" wrote, in part >  and I want to help out so it continues to be an
organization I'm proud to be a part of.
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Re: Guild members 80% and 20% grammar

Polly wrote:

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And on behalf of the resident linguists in the house....

ouch.

Although I tend to side with those who note that we've been ending sentences
with prepositions for centuries.  I can recall some uses in the 1300's that
contained horrific grammar errors by our modern standards (and by their
Middle English ones as well)!

:-)

Anastasia

--who got a bit done on the quilted purse yesterday, and cut a few pieces
for her nephew's Minkee quilt, too!



Re: Guild members 80% and 20% grammar
Ugh!  That's like fingernails on a blackboard!
I could forgive the 'prop' for 'prep'; even the 'with' at the end; but
those apostrophes - eek!
 >g<
.
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--
Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: Guild members 80% and 20% grammar
it looks like the standard foreign language translated into English by a non
native English speaker style to me - it gets worse when it's the "English"
teacher doing this <shudder>

--
Jessamy
In The Netherlands
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Guild members 80% and 20% grammar
One way I teach my students to proofread is to have them illustrate
sentences than can be interpreted in silly ways in their own writings
or commercial writings. One of my favorites was a letter written after
a presentation on origami.

"Last night I made origami birds with my friends. When we were all
done I hung them from the ceiling."



On Fri, 7 Jul 2006 09:20:18 +0200, "Jessamy"

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