OT word of the day - Page 2

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Re: OT word of the day
Downunder they are also called French seams

Dee in Oz


"Sally Swindells"  wrote ...
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Re: OT word of the day
My czech grandma called them french seams too.
Taria


Dee in Oz wrote:

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Re: OT word of the day
What about other things that have nationalistic names?

Is broderie anglais called something different in England?  I must
admit that it took a while for me to figure out what it was because
here in the boondocks of the USA I had mostly heard it called Madeira
work.  I imagine in Madiera that they either call it broderie anglais
or something else entirely.

What about Irish Lace?  Do they call it that in Ireland?  The number
of place names and  ethinic groups used in the names of various kinds
of lace is just staggering.

Hey!  Is English paper piecing called something else in England?

NightMist
does not call American cheese, back cheese.  Though it is tempting to
start. (G)

wrote:

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--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Broderie Anglais is called that here; but isn't it funny that these are
French words used to describe 'English embroidery' (translation), but
that we use the French version?

I think Irish lace would be called by its regional names within Ireland
eg Limerick lace.

English paper piecing is called English paper piecing.  The patchwork
blocks, though, are, in general, called American piecing.

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Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day

Moire
Watermarked
Watered Silk

All of the above could refer to the same fabric, though the last is
fiber specific.

Fabric which has a wavy surface apearance as if it were watermarked.
Each fabric must be treated somewhat differently to achieve the
effect, but the final effect is what the name refers to. Water is
seldom involved, and calendering is usually what is used to achieve
the look. Whereas wool will come out with a flat glazed appearance
when this is done, silk and several other fibers (the other fiber
fabrics often being corded or heavily slubbed to enhance the result)
will crush differently and give the watermarked look.  The fabric is
often starched or otherwise sized to maintain the resulting pattern.


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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Bast Fibre  

Strong, soft, woody fibres such as flax, jute, hemp and ramie which
come from the inner bark of plants

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Sanforized  

A trademarked finishing process which compresses the fabric to reduce
its residual shrinkage to not more than 1 percent.  

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Clo Value

The insulation value of clothing and bedding is measured in Clo units.
Much like the insulation of your house is measured in R units.

At it's most basic, 1 unit of clo value is what a person can
comfortably wear in a 70 F (21C ?) room.

Naked skin has a clo value of 0, a high loft down comforter with a
closely woven top and back has an approximate clo value of 5.

To get the clo value of a given set of clothes, you simply add the
values together.  For example a T-shirt (.09) plus jeans (.25) gives a
value of .34, add socks (.02) and sneakers (.02), and  at .38 clo
units you might be a little underdressed for October.

If you want to play with the math, additional basic info and a handy
dandy chart is here:

http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/clo-clothing-thermal-insulation-d_732.html
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Bombazine

The best known version is a fabric with a silk warp and woolen weft.
Very durable, easy to wear, and suitable for most weather.  It rose to
popularity during the elizabethan period as a mourning fabric, due to
these qualities, and stayed in fashion for such until the last century
which saw the rise of synthetics and a change in mourning customs.

At some points in history, and currently, a silk warp with a weft of
cotton or linen are also called bombazine.

Bombazette is a lightweight woolen fabric.  I have personally seen the
term incorrectly applied to a rayon warp with a woolen weft.  I
suspect that other such odd labling is probably also out there applied
to similar combinations.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
"Bombazine" conjures such interesting pictures--"Bambi in Bombazine,"
"Bombay Bombazine," "Bimbos in Bombazine."
Here is the deriviation of the word, from Merrian-Webster.com:
Middle French, bombasin; from Medieval Latin bombacinum (silken
texture); from bombyx (silk).

Nann


On Oct 30, 1:28=A0am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist) wrote:
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Re: OT word of the day

Denier

A unit of weight for measuring the fineness of threads of silk, nylon,
rayon, etc., equal to .05 gram per 450 meters or 1 gram per 9000
meters.  

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
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I know this varies with nylon, but does it with silk?  Do you get
large- and small-calibre silkworms?

==== j a c k  at  c a m p i n . m e . u k  ===  <http://www.campin.me.uk ====
Jack Campin, 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland == mob 07800 739 557
CD-ROMs and free stuff:  Scottish music, food intolerance, and Mac logic fonts

Re: OT word of the day
Jack, Denier is a measure for threads, not fibers or filaments. Most
threads are spun with several fibers/filaments and the number used, as
well as their size, helps to determine the denier of the thread. How
tightly they are spun also influences the finished denier of the thread.
<G>

Pati, in Phx

Jack Campin - bogus address wrote:
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Re: OT word of the day
Dupion or Dupioni

Irregular rough silk reeled from twinned or interlocked cocoons.
Also refers to the fabrics woven from this uneven silk, or made to
imitate it.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Hong Kong Finish

Commonly described as simply finishing seams with bias tape, it is a
bit more than that.
An adequete explanation may be found at:

http://www.timmelfabrics.com/seamfinishes.htm

A couture touch that was popular in the 50's and 60's, and still a
sharp looking finish for unlined garments.

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Yarn Dyed

Fabrics which have had the yarns colored before the fabric is woven.
Usually used to produce stripes plaids or tapestries.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

christmas basket
http://www.fiskarscrafts.com/projects/instructions.aspx?url=christmasbasket

ok, this one is definitely cottons and quilted.
a scrappy way to cover a basket that is in need of jazzing up a bit maybe.
good use of scraps too.
j.



Re: christmas basket
Thanks O Queen, great idea! Now I'm contemplating modifying it for a
slope-sided basket, unless you already have a site for something like
that!
Roberta in D

On Mon, 3 Nov 2008 14:15:01 +1300, "jeanne-nzlstar*"

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Re: OT word of the day

Plain weave  

The most basic of weaves using single alternate warp and weft yarns.
Any type of yarn made from any fibres can be manufactured into a plain
weave fabric.
Examples are muslin, traditional challais, and most flanels.

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Dobby

The type of novelty weave that results in repeating small geometric
shapes woven across the surface of the fabric.
Or, the loom attachment that allows for the weaving of these fabrics.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

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