OT word of the day - Page 11

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Re: OT word of the day
  snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist) wrote:

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Okay, who knows how to use it to repel cockroaches? We've had a problem
every spring/summer since we moved here, no matter how clean the house
is, and I'd love a sure-fire method to repel them without endangering
Bisou (my cocker QI) or my grands!

--
Sandy -- frustrated in Henderson, near Las Vegas
sw.foster1 (at) gmail (dot) com (remove/change the obvious)
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Re: OT word of the day
Just sprinkle it on the floor close to the walls. Especially where you
see the roaches. And under any low sitting shelving/furniture and so
forth.
The borax doesn't exactly "repel" the roaches and such it affects the
coating on their "shell" so they die. They also carry it back to the
nest and spread it to the others, effectively eliminating the whole
group of them.  <G>

In the desert you will always have some "bugs", it is the nature of
where we live, and it doesn't matter how clean everything is, they
still show up. sigh.

Good luck, and have fun,
Pati, in Phx

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Re: OT word of the day
In article

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Sounds good -- borax is going on my shopping list this week. Thanks.
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Yes, I know that -- after living in the desert for over half a century
<gasp>, it's something I've learned to live with. But somehow
cockroaches seem so ucky. <G>



--
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
sw.foster1 (at) gmail (dot) com (remove/change the obvious)
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: OT word of the day
Point and Point Laces

Point is light gauze or netting used as a ground for point laces.
It is very fine, and there is some arguement as to whether it was
created as an alternative to the using some of the very fine stitches
used to make grounds in needle laces, many of which progress in terms
of inches or fractions thereof per day. In some examples the point is
made as a bobbin lace ground, and then worked as point lace.
Point laces are sort of a cross between embroidered laces and needle
laces. It uses stitches from both.  In design it generally makes use
of the conectivity between motifs as is found in needle lace, while
incorporating some of the more elaborate elements of embroidered lace.
Since it utilizes point as a permanent ground, though the use of
cutwork techniques is not uncommon, it progresses fairly quickly as
the process of making the ground is unecessary.

Bucks point, Romanian point, and Rose point are probably the most
recognizable examples of the art.  

Pictures:

http://lace.lacefairy.com/Lace/ID/BucksPointID.html
http://www.theatik.com/romanian_point_lace.html
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Carolus_-Private_Collection_-_point_de_rose.jpg

--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
american cloth

This term is used in the United Kingdom to describe a waterproof
fabric produced by glazing the surface of an oiled cotton cloth.  Used
for household applications, bookbindings, and inexpensive upholstery,
it has now been mostly replaced by polyvinyl chloride (PVC) coated
fabrics.  

--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Boutis

A wholecloth quilting type from France, best known is that from
Provencal where it is thought to have originated.
It is quite different from standard quilting, though it is somewhat
similar to trapunto.
Two pieces of fabric are put together, and the design is traced on
top.
Then the quilting stitches are placed over the lines.  Sometimes
outline stitching is done instead of the standard running stitch in
order to add depth to the work.  After the stitching is complete
stuffing or cording is added. Stuffing is added in the traditional
trapunto fashion, seperating the threads in the weave of the fabric
and poking it in.  Cording is done by threading the cord, usually
cotton or wool yarn, into a needle, and slipping the needle into the
area to be corded, and bringing it up again a little away.  The yarn
is then cut, and the ends left while more yarn is inserted.  When the
section has been stuffed completely, the ends of the yarn are poked
back through the fabric into the stuffed area.  When useing yarn like
this it may be inserted side by side to cover a broader area, or
confined to narrow channels. A multitude of narrow corded channels in
the backgound of the pattern are typical in boutis design.
There is no broad area of wadding (or batting) in boutis, the only
stuffing is that within the confines of the patterned areas.
Boutis is always reversible, thus similar quality and weave fabric is
used on both sides unlike traditional trapunto wherein the backing
fabric is often a coarser looser weave. Though silk has seen much use
in boutis, fabrics like batiste are more commonly used.

As it is so time consuming the technique is traditionally used for
trousseau, wedding, and baby items primarily, though not exclusively.
In Provencal one of the traditional parts of the baby's christening
outfit is a petasson, a small boutis used to wrap the infant.


--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Orlon

Trade name the first acrylic fiber.  Discovered in 1941 while a
scientist for DuPont was attempting to improve rayon, it went into
commercial production in 1950.  Noted for soft hand, absorbency,
chemical and sunlight resistance, and warmth without weight.   It is
shrink resistant, and a fairly strong fiber.  It blends very well with
other fibres, and is commonly used in yarns and knitted clothing as
well as an assortment of garment fabrics.
--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

New York Hem
Superhem

A method of altering the hemline on jeans, trousers in general,
skirts, and etc.  Useful for preserving an ornamented, or otherwise
difficult visible hem.

The fabric is simply cuffed up wrong side out, until the sewing line
of the original hem is at the correct length for re-hemming minus the
amount of length in the original hem.  A new line of stitching is
placed immediately below the original hem. The cuff of fabric is then
usually trimmed away before being pressed under, and then the hem is
topstitched just above the new stitch line. Some places that do
alterations serge the raw edge in addition to or instead of
topstitching.

Illustrated minus the topstitching here:

http://www.daciaray.com/?p=38


--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Kapok

Fiber harvested from kapok trees in Aisia and Indonesia.  The fiber is
the fluff surrounding the seeds in their pods.
It is consiidered to be a superior fiber for stuffings, and has been
used extensively in water safety equipment, life preservers and so
forth.
Sometimes called "silk cotton" or java cotton, it is lusterous, soft,
quite resilient, water resistant, quick drying, and extremely buoyant.
It is also naturally hypoallergenic, resistant to rot, and oderless.
It gets its buoyancy and some of it's softness from the fact that it
is a tube.  Each fiber is hollow, with air sealed inside of it.  It
can support over thirty times its own weight in water, and will only
lose about 10% of its buoyancy after a month of soaking.
It is eight times lighter in weight than cotton, and because it is
pretty much a bunch of little tubes full of air it makes an excellent
insulator. It has been favorably compared to down as a stuffing for
pillows, matteresses, and parkas.  A quick seach shows the parkas are
harder to come by, at least labled as kapok filled.
While it is pretty sturdy stuff as a loose fiber, it does not hold up
to spinning well, so it is sold strictly as a stuffing material.
--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Addenda:

The kapok tree has a largeish range.  It is a rainforest native and
found throughout the rainforests of Central and South America, as well
as in the Caribbean Islands and the African rainforests.  It is not
harvested on a large scale there though.  Large scale commercial
harvesting is primarily in southeast aisa and Indonesia.

On Mon, 20 Apr 2009 00:41:14 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist)
wrote:

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Hari Kuyo
Festival of the Broken Sewing Needle
Shrine of the Broken Sewing Needle

In Japan both Buddhism and Shinto are intertwined within the culture.
This gives rise to the recognition of the spirt imbued in all objects.
Tools are honored for their own beauty and the partnership they have
with the craftsperson. A master craftsperson carries with themself a
certain reverence for the tools of their craft.  They are not merely
objects that are used to make a living, but friends that aid in the
craft reliably on a daily basis.

So of course tailors and kimono makers in Japan hold their needles in
high regard.

There are specific shrines for broken sewing needles in most areas
where the textile industry is prominent in Japan.  In Wakayama
province they are found in every village.

February 8 in specific is the Festival of Broken Sewing Needles.
On this day kimono makers, tailers and housewives take the day off
from their usual chores to organize their sewing boxes and carry their
broken, bent, or rusted needles and pins to the shrine. There the
needles are placed on a bed of soft tofu in honor of their service.
Mostly observed by women, often they put their troubles into the
needles and pins and ask the gods to take them away. Usually they also
pray for help in improving themselves in their craft.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
I Love this idea! Might be something we ought to start for the large
collection of worn-out SM needles, currently residing in a very old
plastic film container. Now that I will never buy another roll of
film, I might need to go over to tofu as a needle disposal system.
Roberta in D

On Mon, 20 Apr 2009 23:45:20 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist)
wrote:

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Re: OT word of the day

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I love it, too! Lacking film containers, I now use prescription medicine
bottles. The advantage to those is the child-proof caps -- which I only
use when I'm ready to dispose of the whole shebang, as who knows whether
I'd ever get the lid off again? ;)

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--
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
sw.foster1 (at) gmail (dot) com (remove/change the obvious)
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: OT word of the day
Plush

A variety of velvet wherein the pile is much longer.
Traditionally a fabric was not called plush unless the pile was at
least an inch long.  These days it is applied to fabrics with a
shorter pile, especially when they are synthetic or synthetic blends.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Epitropic Fibre

Epitropic fibers are fibers that have particles on their surface that
modify some of the properties of the fiber.

The most common example would be polyester or nylon that is coated in
graphite to change it from a fiber that generates a static charge into
one that dissipates a static charge.  When these particular carbon
coated fibers are woven into a nylon or polyester fabricalong with
regular fibers, the result is a nearly static free fabric.  
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Sometimes one gets a glimmer of manufacturing techniques, through the
ether; but I have never even been vaguely aware about the coating of
fibres for anti-static properties.  Fascinating.  I doubt I'll remember
the detail, but I'm chuffed to know that it exists.  Thanks Nightmist -
again!
.
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--
Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day
Turkey Work
Smyrna Stitch

I hold turkey work to be a distinct thing on it's own and entirely
seperate from candlewicking, though the two may be combined in a
single piece.
I am saying this straight out because I know a good many people use
the two terms interchangeably.  I have also seen redwork called turkey
work, my best guess there is that the color has something to do with
the mislabling.

Turkey work is a needlecraft that gives a piled, or even fuzzy effect.
It has been used for any number of things over the years from rugs to
bedspreads to upholstry to toys and so on.
It has been around since at least the seventeenth century, and has had
periodic fads over the centuries.
While some of the original turkish stitches involved useing a cluster
of threads to make individual tufts on the surface of the fabric,
modern turkey work is primarily makeing loops and cutting them to
create the piled effect.  It can be worked on almost any fabric with a
distinct weave, and with nearly any decorative thread. It is most
commonly done at this point in history by needlepointers, so the
majority of readily available instructions call for needlepoint canvas
and wool.  I have used it on cushion covers with common embroidery
thread and pearl cotton, and found it easy enough to do on embroidery
linen or canvas duck.
When done with wool or knitting yarns it is often brushed to make it
fuzzy, a nice effect for animal fur or teddy bears and what have you.

Here is a picture of a simple bit.  The squirrels tail was made in
this stitch, obviously cutting the loops to leave the threads rather
longish:

http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/photo/2866714860034088454pyGQat

Here are two different sets of instructions for doing this stitch, one
standard, one modified:

http://www.heritageshoppe.com/heritage/stitches/turkey.html
http://www.needlepoint.org/StitchOfTheMonth/2006/aug.php
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
I can't tell you how interesting I find these daily nuggets of information,
Nightmist. Thankyou so much!

(And I'm also very impressed by your personal breadth of knowledge and
practical experience!)

Cheers for now
Tutu
Cape Town, South Africa
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Re: OT word of the day
I've used this stitch to make hair on Raggedy Ann dolls. It also makes
the mane on the donkey on the "Adoration" wall quilt I'm making

Julia in MN

NightMist wrote:
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Re: OT word of the day

Candlewicking

Candlewicking is really nothing more than whitework done with a
heavier thread.
It is generally believed that candlewicking came about back when
embroidery was mostly done in silk, and embroidery silks were
considerably more expensive than today's standard skein of floss.  So
those who wished to embroider but could not afford the costly silks
improvised with less expensive threads.  Whether candle wicking was
ever actually used is a matter for debate.  

There are some basic differences in technique between embroidery and
candlewicking.  Candlewicking uses a single thread doubled for almost
everything, as opposed to varying numbers of fine strands.  There is
usually much more couching in candlewicking.  While there are often
many knots in the work, those knots are much more often colonial knots
(figure eight knots, Quilter's Knots) than they are french knots.
Candlewicking is also traditionally worked on un-shrunk fabric, most
commonly plain muslin. Like most embroidery candlewicking eschews
final knots (tying off knots).  Washing the work to make the ground
shrink after the work is done also "fluffs" the thread, and thus
between the shrinking of the ground and the expanding of the worked
threads the work is more secure.  Between this and the heavier thread
used, candlewicking is considered to be one of the sturdiest forms of
decorative work.  This has led to its frequent use in bedclothes,
cushions, and other household items that see much use and frequent
laundering.
--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

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