OT word of the day - Page 3

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Re: OT word of the day

Wale  

A ridge on the surface of cloth, as with corduroy.  

Or, sometimes just the texture of cloth.  Most frequently seen (by me)
in reference to fabrics with a pronounced patterned texture.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Tencel

A brand name of lyocell fabric used by the Lenzing corporation.
Lyocell is a fiber that is manmade from wood, and alleged to be
sustainable and more enviromentaly friendly than other manmade
fabrics.

As an FYI because I know somebody is going to be curious (since I was
(G)) the lyocell process can be adapted to use bamboo, but bamboo is
more commonly put through the process to make rayon.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Glazed

A finish resulting in a smooth, glossy surface on the fabric. Usually
the fabric is first treated with resin, wax, starch or other
substances then calendered.  

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Jacquard

A weaving process that allows complex designs to be woven into fabric.
The Jaquard Mechanism is comprised of a series of punched pattern
cards (almost like really big versions of computer cards, or perhaps a
player piano roll if you know what one looks like) that carry the
pattern and regulate which warp thread is plucked up when. It allows
much more complex designs than a dobby loom (dobby was word of the day
on the 5th), or a drawloom which was a much more labor intensive
process besides.
Damasks, brocades, and woven tapestries are all examples of woven
jacquards

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Shantung

A midweight plain weave silk fabric with a distinctive texture due to
the use of slubbed yarns.
Sometimes confused with dupioni in modern usage.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Warp    

The vertical threads of a woven fabric.

    
Weft    

The horizontal threads of a woven fabric, the ones that run from
selvedge to selvedge.  

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
I can never remember which is which.  Thanks for this one specially
Nightmist.
.
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--
Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day
Patti - the way I remember things like that is:

You have to do the vertical threads before the horizontal
"a" is before "e"
Warp before weft

HTH
Ginger in CA

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Re: OT word of the day
Wow!  that's clever!  Thanks Ginger.
.
In message
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Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day
And the way that I remember it is that you "warp the loom" to start
weaving. <G>  Took me a long time to be able to remember which was
which, too.

Pati, in Phx

Ginger in CA wrote:
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Re: OT word of the day
Warp: what your cutting mat does when it gets too much sun.  Weft: what it
tries to do.. rises up and down from left to right but never just in one
spot.

Butterfly (up way to early today)


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Re: OT word of the day

Distressed Fabric

Fabric that has been intentionally damaged to change the texture or
drape.
Some common commercial techniques are:

Sandwashing - Tumbling the fabric (wet or dry depending on the fabric
and the company) with sand.

Stonewashing -  Tumbling the fabric with pebbles or small stones

Acidwashing - washing the fabric in an acid bath

Bleachwashing - washing the fabric in a strong bleach solution

Enzymewashing - washing the fabric in a solution containing enzymes
that attack cellulose fibers.  Obviously it is only used with
cellulose fabrics most commonly cotton, but it is becoming popular
using lyocell(1).

The amount of actual damage to the fabric varies due to different
processing and of course differences in the various fabrics treated.
Enzymewashing is considered by many to be the least damaging of the
above processes.  However all of them damage the fabric at the fiber
level and significantly reduce its length of serviceability.

(1) see word of the day Tencel from 11/07
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Well, I'd be distressed, too, if I had a bath like any of these ;)

Ginger in CA
too early, not enough tea

On Nov 12, 11:28=A0pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist) wrote:
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Re: OT word of the day
i've always much preferred denim as it was made rather than that with all
the mess'n about just to change the look.
i prefer change'n the look by wear'n them til they develop their own
markings from wear and washing.
seems to me silly to 'pay more' for the jeans that are 'distressed' and
therefore have a 'shorter lifespan'.

also annoys me when the manufacturers reduce the quantity in a packet of
food rather than increase the price.
folks often dont notice the smaller package and think the maker is being
good by keeping the cost the same for a longer period of time while
inflation hits all the other brands.
eventually folks get used to the smaller package, then they raise the price
later and the makers double their profit.
guess i'm just weird tho.
j.
<just finishing my second cuppa tea of the morning>

"Ginger in CA" wrote...
Well, I'd be distressed, too, if I had a bath like any of these ;)
Ginger in CA
too early, not enough tea

"NightMist" wrote:
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Re: OT word of the day
Nope, not weird. We were just talking about how our favorite brand of bread
no longer 'pops up' when it's toasted. The height is shorter! but the price
went up almost $.50!! Cost more than store brand, but you get a PBJ sandwich
from this bread, not PBJ rolls like with the store brand. So they get you
double...isn't worth the cheaper cost if you can't make a proper sammich.

Butterfly (If I wanted Peanut Butter Balls, I'd make 'em)

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Re: OT word of the day
Lamé  

(French term for trimmed with silver and golden leaves)  

Silk or any textile fiber in which metallic threads are used in the
warp or filling.

By definition, cloth of gold and cloth of silver would be Lamés.
However they are always held seperate from modern Lamé.   The metallic
threads in modern Lamé are almost always mylar or closely related,
thus allowing machine washing.  Cloth of gold and cloth of silver use
the actual metal in their names, and require special handling.

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Basketweave

A weaving pattern in which warp threads and/or weft threads are paired
and treated as a single thread in a plain weave.  For example as in
Monks Cloth.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Throw

A stitch movement in a single direction.  Needle goes up or needle
goes down on a sewing machine.  Needle moves from one side of the
fabric to the other in hand sewing.  Thus for example, whip stitching
by hand requires one throw per stitch, while a single running stitch
by hand requires two.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Just a thank you for posting the word of the day Nightmist.
I am enjoying reading them everyday.
Good job!
Taria

NightMist wrote:

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Re: OT word of the day
Thanks!
I am glad to know people are enjoying it. :)

NightMist

wrote:

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

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