OT word of the day - Page 4

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Re: OT word of the day
To take it one step further, in KNITTING, cause I know some of us do: when
you knit the American way, you Throw the yarn over the working needle, but,
in Continental, you Move the yarn with your left finger over the needle
point of the idle needle. I've been watching How-To-Knit diff stitches on
'youtube' but I've never heard them say the word 'move' or any other for
Continental.

Butterfly (And I'm not positive that "Move" is the word I need.)
.
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knitting Re: OT word of the day
I've converted to continental-style knitting, and really the yarn just
lies there, wrapped around my left index finger. The right-hand needle
does all the moving. To switch between knit and purl, I simply shift
that index finger so the yarn lies at the back or at the front of the
work.
Roberta in D

On Sun, 16 Nov 2008 08:38:43 -0700, "Butterflywings"

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Re: knitting Re: OT word of the day
I'm trying to 're-learn' how to do Continental again. Think it'd be easier
on my hands. My knit stitch is fine.purl is quite loose and you can really
tell the diff.
I know, Practice makes perfect.

I'll do the practicing next year. For now, I just have 'edgings' to put on
all the knitted panels....must make 2 more smallish ones...both have cables,
so I'll continue throwing the yarn for them. Good evening work.

Butterfly (That will get one more UFO finished by year's end)

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Re: OT word of the day
After seeing people do it I have tried to hold and move the yarn with
my left hand.  Just to get an idea of how it is done in case it would
ever be handy.  Unfortunately my left hand is very very stupid.
Gonna have to stick with throwing with the right hand, and working out
new ways to do things that would be more easily done by my left.

NightMist

On Sun, 16 Nov 2008 08:38:43 -0700, "Butterflywings"

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--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
I found this video to be most helpful. I just can't do it when I'm tired.
http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/knit-stitch

Butterfly (also thinking of the 'throw' that you put over your feet while in
your favorite chair).


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Re: OT word of the day

Flannel

A light to medium weight woven fabric with a soft, slightly napped
surface . Expensive flannels of wool and wool blends are usually
napped and fulled whereas less expensive flannels of cotton and other
fibers are usually just napped.  
Cotton flannel is most commonly found as a plain weave fabric, as are
many lighter flannels.  Wool or wool blend flannel may also be a plain
weave but is also sold in twill weave, for example as in suiting
flannel.

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Is there any essential difference between cotton flannel, as described
here, and what we call 'brushed cotton' do you think?
I've often wondered.
.
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Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day
Patti, as I remember... it has been a long while <G> ....
Brushed cotton is lightly brushed not truly napped. A similar process,
but not as "rough", and not as soft a result.

Pati, in Phx

Patti wrote:
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Re: OT word of the day
Ah, thanks, Pati.  That would make sense, as brushed cotton found in
dressmaking fabric shops is not as 'plush' as flannel in patchwork
fabric shops.
.
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Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day
In Britain, 'Flannel' can also mean a terry towelling face cloth OR a word
used to describe  insincere talk intended to deceive, flatter or bluff.

Elly in Scotland


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Re: OT word of the day
How true!
.
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--
Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day
Twill

A variation on basket weave that creates a diagonal effect on the
surface of the fabric.
I have a fever so I will make this simple by illustrating.
If each of the following lines is a warp thread, and O indicates that
thread going over a weft thread, and U indicates that thread going
under a weft thread, twill looks sort of like this (spaces added to
save your eyeballs)

OO UU OO UU
OU UO OU UO
UU OO UU OO
UO OU UO OU
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Entredeux

A term most often seen in heirloom or period sewing these days.
"Between two" it refers to an insert which may be a bit of lace or
ribbon, or in some cases a hem stitch or othe other needlelace-like
variations thereof.
Often found as the boundry between gathers or smocking, and laces or
embroideries.


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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Warp Knit

a knit fabric wherein the knit stitches appear to have been knit
crossways on the fabric, as in tricot or raschel.  They tend to lay
flatter and a be smoother and more run resistant than weft knits.

Weft Knit

a knit fabric wherein the knit stitches appear to have been knit
lengthways on the fabric, as in jersy or interlock.  They tend to have
more stretch than warp knits.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Mohair

The fiber obtained from the angora goat.
It is valued for it's silky texture, and the fact that it does not
felt near so readily as standard wool thus also being considerably
less prone to shrinkage.
Because of its hairlike apearance prior to spinning, it is also
frequently used in making collectible or high end doll's wigs and toy
animal pelts.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Mo hair

What my father always said he wanted for Xmas. He went bald at 23 yrs
old........

Ginger in CA
[jeez give me a good night's sleep, walk at dawn and a cup of tea, you
never know what may be typed out!]

On Nov 21, 8:31=A0pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist) wrote:
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Re: OT word of the day

Cashmere

The undercoat fibers of the cashmere (or sometimes spelled kashmir as
it was originally) goat.
A superior fiber for warmth, durability and texture.  

It is significantly more labor intensive to harvest and prepare for
spinning than most other wools, even when the less desireable harvest
method of shearing is employed. Optimally the goats are combed during
their spring shedding, as this increases the length of the undercoat
fibers obtained and reduces the amount of outter coat hairs
contaminating it.  The wool is then picked over, often mechanically,
to further remove undesirable hairs prior to cleaning.  
In the last decade significantly more problems with fraudulent
lableing have arisen, as the wool may be shipped to several different
countries for processing prior to being woven or knit.  Most recently
a large amount of cashmere yarn that had been adulterated with sheep's
wool during the spinning process, was shipped to China where it was
worked into garments and labled as 100% cashmere. Since cashmere wool
has fluctuated in price between US120 and US190 per pound of unspun
wool, it is easy to see why such practices have been flourishing.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Poplin

A plain weave fabric with fine ribs.
The ribbing is obtained by useing a heavier thread and a higher thread
count in the warp threads than in the weft. Most frequently found in
medium weights of cotton or cotton blends, but can be any weight or
fiber.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Soutache
alternately called Russian Braid

A type of narrow flat braid used as trim.  
Used extensively in old applique patterns.
Also seen as applique on modern clothing for celtic, tribal, or other
designs involving intricate line work where an unbroken line that
overlaps itself is desired.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Tunisian or Afghan stitch

One of the simplest crochet stitches. The even weavelike stitches, and
the reasonably flat surface of this type of work lends itself well to
various forms of needlework embellishment.  
It is worked entirely on the front of the work and is achieved by
simply making a length of chain stitchs, then drawing a loop through
each chain which is held on the hook to the end of the row, then
drawing single chain stitchs back through each individual loop.

When done with warm weight yarns this creates a dense fabric with
reasonable drape that has been compared to thermal blankets in warmth.
When done with crochet cottons or lace weight threads, a sturdy fabric
suitable for cross stitch or tapestry (needlepoint) is made.

If the special long crochet hooks often used in this type of work are
unavailable, the loops may be kept on a seperate bar that is of a size
with the hook being used, or a series of same size hooks may be used*.

*Thank you Butterfly!

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

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