OT word of the day - Page 5

Have a question or want to show off your project? Post it! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View
Re: OT word of the day
Well, cool! Guess I need to add this to my bucket list of things to
learn!

Ginger in CA
[thanks nightmist for doing these word-of-the-day posts]
On Nov 29, 11:17=A0pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist) wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: OT word of the day
Your welcome. I have one that has the middle embroidered with an elephant
and a lion. I don't have the 2 sides embroidered yet. Just can't decide what
would look best.

Butterfly (I get it out every so often and the inspiration just isn't
there.)

Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: OT word of the day
My mom has done TONS of blankets with the afghan stitch.
She taught it to me as well.
She usually does it with a regular weight wool or yarn  and then cross
stitches various designs on it to make nice patterns.

The kicker is that she had a stroke about 20 yrs ago and she crochets
and cross stitches it all with ONE hand!
Her paralyzed hand is tensed up almost into a fist all the time, so
she just shoves the crochet hook in it and does all the work with her
good hand! She has also recently discovered that she can still knit
this way as well.

And blankets done in wool (or even polyester yarn which is what she
usually uses) with the afghan stitch are SO warm!



On Nov 30, 2:17=A0am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist) wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: OT word of the day
Body Canvas

A good quality suit coat is made with three layers of fabric, the one
in the middle is the body canvas. The body canvas is the layer that
gives the suit coat it's proper shape.  Optimally the body canvas is a
material that will hold a shape when ironed properly, yet have a good
drape and be breathable.  A cheap suit may imitate this layer by
useing a coating of glue inside the outer suiting fabric, obviously
this makes an uncomfortable garment. Actual body canvas may be made of
a number of fabrics.  Often wool, or camel hair, or various blends
including these and/or horsehair and cotton are used.  The prefered
fabric, and of course thus the most expensive, is camel hair.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Rep

A weave of fabric wherein heavier threads are used in the warp than in
the weft, giving a texture of crosswise ribs.

You see it often in decorater fabrics, and sometimes also in things
like bathrobes or bedspreads.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Fustian  

A piled fabric with a cotton weft and linen warp.  In later times low
quality wool may have been substituted for the linen, modernly when
you can find a fabric called this it is probably 100 percent cotton.  
The highest quality resembled velvet the poorest quality resembled a
napped fabric. Very popular a few centuries ago for linings and gowns.
It was a fashionable substitute for silk velvet.  
Modern velveteen would make a good substitute.  
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
These are so interesting, Nightmist.  I'm seeing words that I have long
ago heard, but never really knew the meaning of.
Thank you ever so much.
.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

--
Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day

Understitching

A technique that keeps facings or linings from rolling to the outside
of a garment.

Two excellent instructionals, including one from our own Kate, are
here:

http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk/KatePages/Learning/Understitching/understitching_lesson.htm

http://www.mysecretpocket.com/2007/08/understitching.html
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Interlining

A layer of fabric between the outer shell and the lining of a sewn
article that alters the drape of the article, and/or adds insulation.

An interlining may be a thin layer of silk or rayon, or it may be a
sheepskin complete with fleece.  It may be woven, non-woven or knit.
Often it provides additional protection against UV when used in
various curtains, drapes, and covers.

Is modern quilt batting interlining?
Depends on who you ask.  Some sources hold that if it must be quilted
to avoid shifting, bunching, or disintegrating, then it is a seperate
thing. Other sources disagree.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Aniline dyes

Dyes made from coal tar.  Often fugitive many of them tend to fade or
become brownish over time. They are still in use for coloring wood,
but have fallen out of favor in textile dying.  Advancements with dye
technology have repleced them almost completely with more permanent
and easier to use dyes.

It happened sort of like this.  Excessive use of wood raised the
possibility of a serious energy crisis in Europe.  So people started
playing around with coal to see if they could make it easier to use
for some of the same stuff, particularly to replace charcol.  To make
charcol, you heat the bejeezus out of wood in a container, the
bejeezical materials go up the chimmney, charcoal is left in the
container.  They tried it with coal and made coke and coal gas.
Somebody got the bright idea to try and make a purer gas (the gas from
making charcoal was good for burning for light, so coal gas ought to
be, if they could get the nasty sulfer smell out), so they ran it
through a condenser.  It worked, and one of the things that was left
over was coal tar.  Being in a state of high excitement as a result of
all this chemistry, people started playing with the coal tar to see
what useful things could be made from it.  Malaria was being a probelm
in the British Empire due to all the rampant colonialism that was
going on at the time, so Mr. Perkins took a notion to try synthesizing
quinine out of coal tar.  He failed completely, but he did make a
nifty mauve dye and thereby caused the entire Mauve Decade.
Fortunately they figured out how to make other colors pretty quickly.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Quoted text here. Click to load it

There is a newish book about the whole story - called "Mauve",
unsurprisingly.  I've only flipped through it but it looks good.

==== j a c k  at  c a m p i n . m e . u k  ===  <http://www.campin.me.uk ====
Jack Campin, 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland == mob 07800 739 557
CD-ROMs and free stuff:  Scottish music, food intolerance, and Mac logic fonts

Re: OT word of the day
Nightmist, I thank you for all the trouble you go to, to make sure we are
educated!  That sound like a smarty pants statement but I truly thank you.
Barbara in FL



Re: OT word of the day
On Wed, 10 Dec 2008 10:37:12 -0500, "Bobbie Sews Moore"

Quoted text here. Click to load it
If I have introduced the word "bejeezical" into anyones vocabulary
then my job satisfaction is nigh unto complete.

NightMist
when I have days like that the english language is in no way safe
--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Marled

Yarns made up of 2 different colors, produced by combining fiber
strands (rovings) of 2 different colors, or twisting together 2 yarns
of different colors, or by cross dyeing plied yarns of 2 different
fibers.  

--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Taffeta

A smooth, crisp, tightly woven, plain weave fabrc, noted for its body.
Pre twentieth century references to it mean a silk fabric. Since the
twentieth century however, it could mean a synthetic fabric.

References to rustling petticoats, or the rustle of silk, almost
always refer to taffeta.  It is almost as well known for its sound as
its suitabilty for linings and middle garments.  
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Greige Fabric  

Most literally griege fabrics are fabrics that are unfinished.
They are unchanged from when they were rolled off the loom, and have
not been washed, dyed, stretched, pressed, or treated in any way.

After washing the weave of griege goods will close up some, and may
appear very different from the unwashed state.  This also affects the
shrink which will be more considerable in griege fabrics than in
finished fabrics.  Expect the shrink to be anywhere from five to
fifteen, or even twenty percent, dependent on fiber composition and
the weave.  Depending on quality, content, and weave, griege fabric
may shrink in unpredictable ways, thus retentering the fabric may
become necessary.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Grading  

Seams- Reducing the bulk of seams by trimming the individual seam
allowances at different widths.  

Patterns- altering a pattern to a different size.  For example
altering a pattern for 12 inch quilt block to make an 18 inch block,
or perhaps a 10 inch block.  
Another example would be altering a garment pattern to fit a different
size person, or just to fit different sized features, such as
increasing or decreasing the bustline, and etc.

--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Sari Fabric  

A length of uncut fabric, five to seven yards long, usually of thin
cotton or silk.  
When worn, part of the fabric is wrapped around the waist to form a
skirt, and one end is thrown over the shoulder.  There are regional
variants as to how to wear the end thrown over the shoulder. It is
usually worn over a thin underskirt.  The accompanying top is called a
choli.

There are an amazing number of looming, dying, and embroidery
techniques, again varying by region, that can go into a length of sari
fabric.  An astonishing amount of sari fabric, particularly silk, is
still handloomed.  Some techniques are being kept alive only by one or
two familes. It may take six months or more for two people to complete
a single length.  
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
There are many sari shops along Devon Avenue, the commercial center
for Chicago's Indian community.  The saris range from cheap rayon
($10) to elegant silk ($$$$).   There are also many salwaar kamiz
(sp?)--the tunic/trouser combo, usually elegantly embellished.

At our AAUW state convention a couple of years ago two of the Indian
members showed us how to wrap a sari.  The models were non-Indian
AAUWs--they showed that saris flatter everyone!

Nann
P.S. Before you ask:  www.aauw.org will tell you more about the
organization that has breaks through educational and economic barriers
to give all women a fair chance.


On Dec 16, 5:31=A0am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist) wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: OT word of the day

Raw Silk
Silk Noil

I have to put these two together, because they are often used as
synonyms, but they are not.

Raw Silk  is silk woven from the strands as reeled straight off the
cocoon. The strands are connected as they are thrown on the loom, they
are comletely untreated and unspun.  This is why raw silk is nubby and
slubby, and has to be well washed before use.  Reeled Silk is a
synonym.

Silk Noil is silk spun from the interior fibers of the cocoons.  These
fibers are shorter, finer and softer than the outer fibers, and for a
long time were regarded as a waste product because they are a pain to
work with.  Sometimes longer coarser fibers from broken cocoons are
used with the inner fibers, this makes the inner fibers easier to work
with and provides a use for the broken cocoons which were once also
regarded as a waste product because they cannot be used in standard
silk spining processes.  Spinning using the short fibers creates a
slubby, uneven yarn.

Both Noil and Raw silk have a similar appearance and weight, though
they feel very different, and wear differently.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Site Timeline