OT word of the day - Page 6

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Re: OT word of the day

Ground

The fabric upon which designs are worked.
OR
a small all over desigin that serves as a background to a larger
design.

Both references apply to various sorts of decorative work, embroidery,
needlepoint, printing, painting etc.

In lacemaking it usually refers to the sections between motifs.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
So that's where the term 'background' came from. I hadn't realized thy were
2 separate words.

Butterfly (how interesting)

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Re: OT word of the day

Points and Aiguillettes

These terms go all the way back to before knights in shineing armor.
In fact they were sometimes used to describe the thongs holding some
of that shining armor in place.

Originally the metal tags on thongs of leather. By the 15th Century,
the metal tags were called aiguillettes and the thongs 'points'. Used
on a garment by placing a corresponding row of eyelet holes in the
garment and the section of or the seperate garment to which it was to
be attached,(recalling that back then things like sleeves were a
seperate garment) threading the points through the holes and tying the
ends together.
Sometimes they were functional, the equivilent to modern buttons and
zippers.  Sometimes they were purely ornamental.

In modern times, aiguillettes are the fancy braided cord seen on
military or police dress uniforms.

The word aglet, which is what the stiff metal or platic bit on the
tips of shoelaces is called, is derived from aiguillettes.
It all comes from the french word for needle, aguille.
Which of course comes from the latin word for needle, acus.

--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Hessian
Burlap

The scratchy stuff sacks are often made of.
Usually coarse woven of jute, possibly in combination with similar
fibers (hemp, sisal, etc.).

It actually was part of Hessian soldier's uniforms.

In addition to sacks it also has assorted uses in crafts, as a rug
base, in assorted interior decor, as a protective covering in
agriculture, in religious mortifications, and etc. It is still
prefered by some people for part of the barrier between subflooring
and laid flooring that is secured with adhesives, or as an underlayer
for roofing felt, and similar constructions.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
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For anybody visiting Scotland, a visit to the Verdant Works in Dundee
is a must.  It's a jute processing factory turned into an industrial
museum.  (Dundee used to be the world's leading centre for jute
processing).  All the original machinery is still there, you can see
and handle samples of jute in every stage of processing and made into
an incredible range of things, and they tell the story of the industry
in India as well as Scotland.  Films, sound recordings, dioramas about
the social history of Dundee, the lot.

==== j a c k  at  c a m p i n . m e . u k  ===  <http://www.campin.me.uk ====
Jack Campin, 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland == mob 07800 739 557
CD-ROMs and free stuff:  Scottish music, food intolerance, and Mac logic fonts

Re: OT word of the day

Vicuna

Quite possibly the most expensive natural fiber in the world.

Vicuna are a South American camelid, related to llamas and alpacas.
However they can only be safely shorn about every three years, and
only about a pound of wool is obtained from each animal.  The wool is
fine, exceptionally warm, and one of the softest, most comfortable
fibers to wear.
They became severely endangered, and were listed as such in the mid
70's.  Now there are about 120,000 animals known to exist.  
Formerly Vicuna were shot and then sheared as it was easier than
catching them.  The governments of some South American countries, most
notably Peru which has the highest vicuna population, have begun
organized roundups of the animals, after which their coat is measured,
and if deemed long enough shorn.  Then all the animals are released.
The benefits to both the animals and the local communities have been
high.  Domestication has thus far been unsuccessful, as the animals
keep escapeing.
Currently properly labled (indicateing sanctioned and sustainable
harvest methods) vicuna wool is legal for sale in both the US and the
EU.  Vicuna is always undyed because it does not hold up to any dying
process at all.  Scarves made of vicuna start at about US1500, between
US1000 and 1500 are vicuna blends, at less than US1000 they might have
shown the scarf to a vicuna.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Fascinating, Nightmist.  This series is just wonderful.  Thank you so
much for going to the trouble to do it.  I've known 'bits and pieces',
but the vast majority of the detailed info. you give, is new to me.
See, still learning!!
.
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--
Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day

The Bayeux Tapestry

One of the textile treasures of the world.
The Bayeux Tapestry is an embroidery, wool on linen, that is
approximately 20 inches wide and 75 yards long. Some of the last part
is missing, a section estimated to be 8 to 10 feet in length, so the
exact length of the original work is unknown.
It was commissioned shortly after 1066 and depicts events leading up
to, and the Battle of Hastings and the Norman conquest of England.
Current theory has it that it was commissioned by Bishop Odo of
England and created at the school of embroidery then located in
Canterbury in Kent. There is much about the tapestry that indicates an
English origin, though it has been located in France for centuries.
It spent much of its history in the cathedral at Bayeux, but it now
has a dedicated museum in the same city.
The consistancy of design tends to make people believe that it was
designed by a single person, but who this person was is unknown.  The
work itself was certainly a group effort.
It is priceless not only as an art treasure, but as one of the few
historical accounts surviving from that time.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Kimono Fabric

Most often cotton or silk, though rayon and other synthetics have
crept into use over the last hundred years.

Highly sought by many for its quality and patterning, which, with
fiber, varies according to the formality of the kimono it is intended
to make, and the age and marital status of the person to be wearing
it.
Most of the better quality silks are sold undyed prior to being made
up, as much of the ornamentaion of formal kimono, and the highly
decorated kimono for young women, is done after or while the kimono is
made.
The weave of the fabric also varies according to climate, age of the
intended wearer, and formality.

Kimono fabric is sold by the tan, which could be likened to a small
bolt that is 29.5 ft long by just shy of 12 inches wide.  Each tan is
intended to make one adult kimono.

Several of the weavers dyers, and etc. involved with making kimono
have been designated as Living National Treasures by the Japanese
government.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
I have a friend who lives not far from here who imports these 'small
bolts' and sells them at quilt shows - along with her books on sashiko
and kimono.  She recently had an exhibition of kimono, showing all the
different kinds and colours for the various occasions.  So interesting.

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--
Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day

Flat Felled Seam

An enclosed reinforced seam frequently used where a little extra
strength is desired, to reduce seam bulk, or for decorative purposes.

There are several ways of doing it, whichever one is the one you were
taught or prefer to use, is the right one.  (G)

Here are three of the most commonly used methods.

1)  Sew a seam with the fabric wrong sides together.  Trim one side of
the seam close to the fabric.  Fold the other side of the seam over
the trimmed side, fold it under itself, and topstitch down.

2)  Sew a french seam starting with right sides together.  Press to
the side.  Topstich down.

3) Press a fold between 3/8 and 5/8s wide (as suits the project) along
the seam edge of each section of fabric, pressing one fold to the
right side of the fabric, and the other side to the wrong side of the
fabric.  Carefully nest the folds with the section pressed to the
wrong side on top, and the raw edge of the fabric next to the pressed
fold.Topstitch along the fold, flip and topstitch along the other
fold.

These seem to me to be three different seam styles, but there it is.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Warp Faced
Weft Faced

Sometimes when weaving the threads going in one direction or the other
will dominate the faces of the fabric.  For example when a heavier
yarn is used for the warp or the weft it may be the only visiable yarn
in the fabric. When the warp yarns dominate the surface of the fabric,
the fabric is called warp faced.  When it is the weft yarns, the
fabric is called weft faced.
There are various weaving techniques that may almost always give one
result or the other.  Inkle weaving is almost always warp faced for
example, while tapestry is almost always weft faced.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Accordion Ribbed Knit

A very stretchy rib knit comprised of alternateing sized ribs, 1x1
followed by 2x2.
Often seen in hosiery of all sorts.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Cartridge Pleat  

Most often used in period costumes.
Deep, even 'accordion' gatherings accomplished by shirring (pleating
like an accordion), usually in three rows. Tacked on by single or
double stitches to the edge of the bodice, doublet or waist band.
The pleats generate too much bulk to use standard seaming.


--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Satin
Sateen

The difference between these is wholly in the fiber content.
They are both satin weaves.
There are two basic varieties of satin weave, warp face and filling
face.  Warp face is the most common of the two.  In warp face the weft
thread passes over one warp thread, and then under several.
In filling face (filling is often used as an alternate term for weft),
the process is reversed, so that the weft thread passes under one warp
thread and over the next several.  

Satin is usually made of silk, or filament synthetic threads,
sometimes a blend of both.  

Sateen is usually made of cotton, or other spun yarns.

--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Tailor's Ham

A firmly stuffed ham shaped cushion, used for pressing seams and darts
in garments so that they retain their shape well.

Some older sewing books give instructions for making your own ham, and
almost always advise making them entirely out of a "strong woolen",
and stuffing with sawdust or horsehair.  There are exceptions, velvet
or velvet covered hams seem to have had a devoted following for
pressing silks and delicate fabrics.  I confess I have one and use it
for pressing velvets mostly. (1)
There are still instructions for making your own available, including
online.  In this day and age with more diversity of fabrics, and
electric irons, often hams are made of all cotton, or half cotton and
half wool. The stuffing should still be very firm however, and I have
found sawdust from kiln dried wood to be optimal, with horsehair or
synthetics a very distant second.  Hair and synthetics tend to be more
difficult to stuff evenly, and it is more difficult to get the desired
firmness, especially with synthetics.  They also begin to smell a bit
after a while.  Cotton wadding would probably work if you could stuff
it firmly and evenly enough without damaging your seams.

(1)  with velvets I usually give the hard pressing to the lining and
interlining, and am much more gentle with the outer so as to save the
pile.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
I actually have a pressing cloth for velvet!!  It's like a synthetic
velvet itself; but tougher, presumably?
(I also have a tailor's ham!!  I used to take my clothes making very
seriously >g<)
.
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--
Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day
I have a tailor's ham and HAD a velvet board. Haven't seen that in years.
Wonder where it went.....

Butterfly (have a stack of 5" squares of velvet and sequined velvets cut and
ready for a someday quilt. Just need more velvet to cut. )

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A glitzy velvet quilt was: word of the day
You are using SEQUINED velvets in a quilt? Only real velvet, or are you
including velveteen? Colors, goal, purpose?? Details woman, details!
PAT in VA/USA

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Re: A glitzy velvet quilt was: word of the day
A-Ha!
I knew somebody would latch onto this and ask questions!
I wanna know too!
I do have some velvet scraps.  Which you can have if rayon pile-silk
backing would go with what you are doing.  Since I dye the garment
finished or in pieces rather than the yardage, I bet they would match
your color scheme. (G)

One of these days I am going to make one myself.  
There is one down at the historical society that is scalloped fans
scattered across a crazy quilt. Embroidered seams, and the fans are
light colors while the crazy pieces are darks.  All silk velvet, and
backed with what appears to be bombazine.   It dates from about 1880.
Very drool worthy.

NightMist

On Thu, 1 Jan 2009 13:34:40 -0500, "Pat in Virginia"

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

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