OT word of the day - Page 8

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Re: OT word of the day
Welt

In addition to being a bit of soft leather used to reinforce the sole
of a piece of footwear, it is the bit of fabric that is used to make
bound buttonholes or pockets.  

instructions for welted pockets are here:

http://www.savvyseams.com/techniques/pipedpocket.php

This is one of the simplest instructionals I have found for it, and it
varies from the way I do it only in that I tend to turn the whole welt
to the backside at once, then sort it out and press it.  Buttonholes
are made pretty much the same way but on a smaller scale, and of
course without the pockets and turning the raw edge under before the
final stitching..
Cording can easily be added to the edges by basting or gluing it to
the welt next to the stitch line, and then proceeding as normal.  A
bit of cording helps make it nice and even and serves as a guide for
stitching when finishing the welt.

--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Darning

I see that I have previously done darning eggs, but neglected darning
itself!

Darning is a mending process whereby a hole in the fabric is flled by
reweaving the fabric with new thread.
For most utilitarian purposes darning is done with a simple plain
weave.  Though in knit fabrics often the knit is reproduced either by
matching the knit stitches in horizontal rows with a needle and thread
after placeing vertical strands of thread, or with a crochet hook or
knitting needles if it is a bulky knit. This reknitting helps maintain
the stretch inherent in knit fabrics, and avoids "runners"from the
damaged area.
If the original yarn or thread can be matched, it is possible to
repair a garment through darning so that the rent or hole is nearly
undetectable.  However as with any other mending any weakened threads
or fabric must be cut away prior to starting, or new damage will occur
where the strong new thread meets the old weakened fabric.

--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Saxony

A high quality soft heavy napped woolen fabric, usually made into
coats.
Also may refer to a soft fine woolen tweed used as an informal suiting
fabric.

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Microfiber

Superfine synthetic fibers used to produce soft lightweight farics.
Some manufacturers are defining microfibers as being less than 1
denier in weight, but the stuff is too new on the market to have a
firm definition as yet.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

letttuce edge
lettuce hem

A serged hem that is stretched as it is sewn so that it is ruffley
when finished.

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Holland

A lightweight plainweave fabric with a stiff glaze, frequently of
cotton or linen. Often used for lampshades and window treatments.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Ramie

It is a plant fiber similar to flax, and comes from the stalk of a
plant that appears to have originated in the orient.
The plant itself may grow up to 8 feet tall and is a sort of
non-stinging nettle. The fibers can be removed from the plant either
by hand or machine without retting it.  Which if you have ever toyed
with the notion of growing your own plant fiber is a tremendous thing.

It is stonger than flax, and stronger still when wet.  However while
it is one of the strongest plant fibers it is one of the least
durable, so it is used primarily in blends.

Fabrics made with it tend to have a luster to them, and it dyes
magnificently.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Ooh!  Thanks for this one.  I have seen it 'around' and have wondered
whether it was natural or synthetic.

Continuing fascinating series.  Thanks Nightmist.
.
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--
Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day
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I saw people growing their own flax in Romania last year (picture at
http://www.campin.me.uk/Travel/Romania2008/Garden.jpg, which is part
of my Romania travelogue at http://www.campin.me.uk/Travel/Romania2008 /)
but I didn't see how they processed it.  Just soak it in a tub till it
turns into slimy fibrous gunge?


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Any idea what makes it fail and if there's anything you can do to
extend its life?

==== j a c k  at  c a m p i n . m e . u k  ===  <http://www.campin.me.uk ====
Jack Campin, 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland == mob 07800 739 557
CD-ROMs and free stuff:  Scottish music, food intolerance, and Mac logic fonts

Re: OT word of the day
On Mon, 23 Feb 2009 12:17:07 +0000, Jack Campin - bogus address

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Often yes that is exactly how it's done.
You pretty much just rot away everything but the fiber.  Thus making
it a long, messy, stinky, process. I have been reading about
alternatives in the past few months, the most promising of which is
bundling the flax after harvest and hanging it exposed to the elements
for the winter. It is then rolled to break up any clinging dry bits,
shaken out and washed a few times. It sounds promising, but I honestly
don't know how clean the resultant flax would be, nor if it would take
damage from the freeze-thaw cycle. I don't know how well it would work
with other plants either.
Of course people have been experimenting with chemical processes, and
some of those work on an industrial level, but always with a weaker
end product than the traditional gives. That is where some of the
poorer quality linen in the world comes from.

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Nope.
I have dyed a few blends of it, and it is a glorious thing.  kiri has
a ramie-nylon blend sweater that is sooooo yummy on the skin!  Thus
that failure is indeed something that is one of my ongoing research
projects.  From unwinding a ravel I would suspect that it has a
problem similar to kevlar.  Each strand seems to be made of shorter
microstrands. Which combine to make a very strong main strand, but
fray off easily. Have to find a source where somebody is actually
addressing the durability issue since I don't have enough to play with
to sort it out to any reasonable degree.
So far what I have run across is mostly just "low abrasion
resistance", and wikipedia tells us it has a lack of cohesion between
fibers.  I am wondering if the problem with ramie, and the falling
quality of linen are related. If they are cleaning all or most of the
natural waxes and resins out of the fiber before turning it into
yarns, it is going to go to hell in a handbasket pretty quickly. While
those waxes and all are what make linen a real beast so far as
wrinkling and ironing, they are also what make it nigh unto eternal. I
don't see the ancient egyptians and the ancient chinese useing a fiber
for cloth that deteriorates so quickly as modern ramie, or modern
linen for that matter. Ramie has been used in such places for at least
the last six thousand years. They have found it in ancient mummy
wrappings and in assorted clothing dating back all those millenia.
Thus IMHO modern processing techniques are highly suspect.

The plant has been imported in various places as an ornamental, and it
has escaped cultivation and naturalized in almost every one of those
places.  So obviously it is easy to grow.  If the durability could be
sorted it could be a kicking cottage industry.

For a map showing where it has naturalized in the US:

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=BONI2

For a pictures of the plant:

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/25327 /

You can also click on the name of the plant at the above link to get
cultivation details and growth habits.

I note that according to davesgarden the plant may be classed as a
noxious weed in at least one place.

NightMist



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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
This is a very interesting topic. I'll be in Lithuania for a week next
month, and there will be some sort of linen tour. So I'll pay close
attention to methods.

AFAIK nettles were used for fiber in Europe, especially where flax was
harder to grow. Ref. the fairy tale of Ilsa and her brothers, who were
all turned into swans by the wicked witch. So Ilsa had to harvest
nettles, spin the yarn, knit each of them a sweater, and throw a
sweater over each swan to reverse the spell.

Roberta in D

On Mon, 23 Feb 2009 18:34:06 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist)
wrote:

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Re: OT word of the day
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One thing I did see was the carding process - they used a board about
three feet long with a clump of sharpened nails driven through it at
the halfway point, maybe 30 nails 2 inches long in a bunch four inches
across.  It took a lot of force to do it.

The folk camp did a re-enactment of a women's spinning and carding bee.
There were lots of traditional Hungarian songs and joke routines to go
along with this, most of them unladylike in the extreme.

==== j a c k  at  c a m p i n . m e . u k  ===  <http://www.campin.me.uk ====
Jack Campin, 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland == mob 07800 739 557
CD-ROMs and free stuff:  Scottish music, food intolerance, and Mac logic fonts

Re: OT word of the day
Baby Hem

A very narrow enclosed hem, usually used on delicate fabrics.

A step by step is here:

http://www.burdastyle.com/howtos/show/1262
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
NightMist wrote:
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I've done hems like that, but didn't know it was called a baby hem. My
old McCall's Sewing Book calls it simply "Narrow machine hem". I think I
used it on some bridesmaids' dresses.

Julia in MN

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Re: OT word of the day
overshot

weaving patterns created by throwing the warp thread over more than
one weft thread at regular intervals.  They may be simple, or complex
combinations that regularize over a several passes of the shuttle.
Very often the warp is a heavier yarn than the weft.

--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Lawn  

A lightweight semi-sheer fabric originally of linen.  It has a crisp
finish and and resists wrinkleing better than standard linen. Nowdays
most lawn is made of cotton.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Acetate

A manufactured fiber usually made of cotton lint, though sometimes
wood is added or used instead..

it is made like most other attempts at manmade silk.  The basic fiber
is treated with an acid, then it is extruded through a spinneret and
hardened.

In the case of acetate the cotton lint is treated with acetic acid
before being spun out.

Acetate is not the sturdiest of fabrics.  It is one of the fabrics
most susceptible to damage from heat or common chemicals.  It burns
very quickly, and will scorch at a hint of excessive temperature when
ironing.  It will melt when exposed to alcohol or many of the common
compounds containing acetyl radicals. Acetone (nail polish or nail
polish remover for example) and, superglue will dissolve it almost
instantly.  Vinegar, wine, or perfume will take only a little longer
to destroy the fabric.

It does dry quickly as it does not readily absorb moisture, and will
resist wrinkling in general use.  It can be soft with a good drape,
though most people think of old store bought Halloween costumes or
cheap graduation gowns when they think of acetate.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Slub
Slubbed

A slub is a defect in a yarn or thread that is basically a lump where
a lump ought not to be.
Originally it only applied to lumps caused by a defect in the spinning
or carding process.   However over time in common use it also  now
includes bumps caused by "flying fibers" being spun into the thread.
"Flying fibers" is a fancy way of saying airborne lint.  Which is
inevitable in a high speed textile process, but which manufacturers do
usually do their best to try to shield the spinning threads from.

Slubbed yarns and threads are those which are spun with intentional
slubs in them.  These may be woven into slubbed fabrics such as silk
noil, or sold for specialty applications such as certain types of
three dimensional embroidery or knitting and crochet.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Notch

A pattern marking, usually shown as a darkened diamond or double
diamond on commercial patterns, indicating a good place to put a mark
for matching pieces.  The mark may be made with any of the standard
marking tools, tailors chalk, dressmakers, carbon, marking pencils or
markers, etc., or it may be a tailors tack, or simply a cutting
usually following the pattern marking outwards though some garment
makers prefer to cut into the seam allowance rather than outwards.

Notches are particularly handy to mark curves or areas to be gathered
prior to matching.

They can be used in quilting and are very handy when making curved
patterns such as drunkard's path blocks or DWW.  When working with
bought templates, simply match the pieces together and use adhesive
dots to mark notches, then as you cut mark the fabric with your marker
of choice to indicate the notches on the individual pieces.

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Challis

pronounced SHA-lee

A lightweight plainweave fabric, soft, with superior drape.
Currently it is often found commercially with small overall patterns,
frequently floral.

Formerly the most common challis was wool, and wool is still highly
popular.  However rayon challis is probably the best selling variety
now.  It is much in demand for a variety of garments.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

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