OT word of the day - Page 9

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Re: OT word of the day

Boundweave

A variety of weft faced twill weaving wherin a pattern is developed
through the use of color.  The patterns are usually designed in
blocks,  so the design phase can be rather akin to designing a quilt.
You can repeat the same block, or combine blocks for a more complex
effect.
Usually this type of weaving gives a very heavy fabric, best suited to
carpets or upholstry.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

button pins

I am just so happy that I finally found somplace that sells the darn
things I giving it to you as todays term!  I've been mangling quilt
pins with pliers to get by since the local store that had them closed.

The object of the things is to create a no sew attachment for buttons
that are too expensive or too unique to trust to the dry cleaner or
the laundry.
These are safety pins with a half loop in the sharp side.
You can put them right through the fabric of a garment, but I prefer
to make eyelets to thread them through.
  
Put the pin through from the wrong side, loop the shank of the button
on, and the put the pin back through to the wrong side, and close the
pin. The shank of the button will nest in the half loop.


Picture of them in the package here:

http://sewtrue.com/Store/Button-Pins-P441.html



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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Thanks.  I didn't even know they made such things.
Gen

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Re: OT word of the day
Stay stitching

A line of stitching just inside the seam allowance from the seam line.
Generally used on curves to stabilize them and prevent distortion.
It is sometimes used (other than for curves) on fine fabrics or
stretch fabrics to stabilize the area of the seam line and prevent
distortion due to stretching or slipping.

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
I like to "stay stitch" on the seam line when I am going to have to
turn anything right side out through an opening left in a seam. <G>
The stitching helps keep the opening from stretching when you pull
everything through, makes it easy to turn the edges in accurately and
quickly, and helps me remember to leave the opening. (yeah, none of us
have ever just sewn completely around then had to unsew an opening to
turn it. Yeah. <VBG>)  If there is a chance this stitching will show,
I use a basting stitch that is easier to pull out. <G>

Stay stitching is wonderfully useful.

Pati, in Phx

On Mar 6, 10:18=A0pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist) wrote:
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Re: OT word of the day
I often stay stitch around the outside of a quilt top, especially if
there are any bias edges. If there are bias bits in the center section
of a quilt, I stay stitch before putting on the borders; it helps keep
the borders from getting wavy. I also stitch around a quilt sandwich
before putting the binding on to help eliminate wavy edges.

Julia in MN

NightMist wrote:
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Re: OT word of the day

Bent

This is a fairly obscure term for something that was fairly common for
a few centuries.

It refers to willow or reeds used to bone corsets and gowns.
When one could not afford the steel, or bone stays or hoops, it was
not very uncommon to resort to wood or bundles of reeds.  Being more
flexible, they were actually easier to work with and wear.  Often thin
pieces were bundled or plaited, sometimes being more or less quilted
into place rather than being slipped into fabric casings that had been
sewn into place.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
How odd that this word showed up today.  I was reading a book last night and
the term "bent" was used in regards to her corset.  I didn't know what it
meant.  Thank you!
Gen

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Re: OT word of the day

Bobbin Lace
Pillow Lace
Bobbinette

A type of lace where the threads are held on a series of bobbins, and
pinned to a cushion while it is being made.
The threads are intertwined, and pinned according to a paper pattern
that is pinned onto the cushion. Traditionally the cushion is heavy,
cylindrical, and rotated to make room for continuous work, while the
finished lace is wound off.  These days when shopping for cushions I
see that most of what is available are flat, or wedge shaped cushions
which seems to me to be a step backwards, but preferences do vary.

Some of the most well known types of pillow lace are Valenciennes
(Binche),  Torchon (Cluny), Chantilly, and the assorted Maltese
varieties.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
I used to live in Bedford (England!) which was a great centre for bobbin
lace.  It doesn't have such a famous history as those you mentioned, but
it is significant in the history of such lace.  The making of it never
did appeal to me, though.
.
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--
Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day
You really only need the roller cushion for making long strips of
lace. Lots of lacemakers prefer to make single pieces (e.g. bookmarks,
window hangings) and need a broad flat space, hence the
footstool-shaped ones.
Roberta in D

On Tue, 10 Mar 2009 07:04:18 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist)
wrote:

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Re: OT word of the day
charmeuse  

A silk fabric that is a glossy satin on the front, and matte on the
back.  It frequently is used for a crepe backed satin, which would
technically be a charmante.  
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Burn out
Devore technique
chemical lace

A technique for creating embossed, engraved, or lace effects on
fabric.
Usually done useing fabric of completely different fibers, for example
silk-rayon, polycotton and etc., it is a chemical process wherein a
chemical that will destroy one of the fibers without harming the other
is applied to the fabric following the desired pattern, heated to
activate the reaction, and then washed. When the fabric is washed, the
remaining chemical and the residue of one fiber are rinsed away,
leaving the other fiber intact. Generally it is cellulose fiber that
is dissolved, and a protien or synthetic fiber that is unaffected.

This method has been employed for nearly 150 years in the commercial
manufacture of "chemical lace".  It is also quite popular for
replicating cut velvet patterns on velevets, velveteens, and plush.  

I have personally marveled at some DIY webpages that detail how to do
burn out with nothing but heat.  People taking things like coat hanger
wire and branding synthetic velvets to get a burn out effect, and yet
they don't wind up with a molten glob or a hole in the fabric.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

French Cuffs

A style of shirt cuff.  It is twice as long as the standard cuff, and
worn folded back on itself and fastened with cufflinks or  a silk
knot.

While they were almost only seen in formal wear for some time, they
are currently reappearing on men's shirts in more casual settings.
Primarily found on gentleman's shirts, they are also now seeing some
application in ladies trouser sets of the type that are tailored to
resemble men's suits. Sometimes without the rest of the shirt.
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Hem Facing

Using a seperate band of fabric to make a hem.  Generally sewn on,
turned under, and blindstitched down by hand.  Very useful for
intentionally non-straight hemlines, flared garments, to reduce bulk,
or just when you have not given yourself enough hem allowance.

A simple tutorial is at:

http://www.oliverands.com/blog/tutorials/2008/08/hem-facing.html
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day

Trapunto

A technique whereby particular patterns quilted into a piece are
raised above the rest of the quilting by virtue of extra padding.

There are almost as many ways of doing it as there are pieces done
this way.

A nice overview is here:

http://www.quiltersmuse.com/wholecloth_quilts4.htm

For what it is worth, the way I did it pre-rctq, was to baste batting
to the back of the top, with the basteing stitches just inside the
stitch line for the pattern.  Then I would trim away the batting
outside the pattern, and sandwich and baste as usual.  Chunks and bits
of batts work fine for this.
Nowdays when I do it (mostly on clothes) I use water soluble thread.

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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
Baize

A coarse, woven, woolen fabric.  In present times it may be made of
cotton instead of wool.  It is found both napped and unnapped.  It is
not intended to ever be washed, and doing so, or even allowing it to
become damp, may cause it to distort fiercely.

Its main use in this day and age is to cover gamming tables, mostly
cards and assorted varieties of billiards.
While professional and tournament billiard tables usually are covered
in actual wool felt, what is called felt on the average pool table is
most often baize.  

In assorted books set in large houses at a time when servents were
common in such, you may find a reference to a "green baize door".  The
baize covered door denoted the boundry between the household and the
servents.  Beyond the baize door was the servent's domain where work
was organized and much of it carried out.  
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
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Why is it always green?  Didn't anybody, anywhere, ever have a purple
pool table?

==== j a c k  at  c a m p i n . m e . u k  ===  <http://www.campin.me.uk ====
Jack Campin, 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland == mob 07800 739 557
CD-ROMs and free stuff:  Scottish music, food intolerance, and Mac logic fonts

Re: OT word of the day
Our pool table is grey.

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Kathyl (KJ)
remove "nospam" before mchsi
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Re: OT word of the day
On Sun, 22 Mar 2009 01:00:42 +0000, Jack Campin - bogus address

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The traditional excuse as regards gaming tables is that it is in
imitation of a lawn.
Personally I think they made that up, and it is just that green is one
of the cheapest and easiest colors to get a stong permanent take with
on woolens. Which is no doubt why the servent's door was green, unless
there is some arcane UK thing about the color.
Of course these days with the new dyes and all you could have more
colors for tables.
And lo! the bar downtown got a table in blue, I bet to match the
cheapest brand of chalk. (G)
I used to shoot pool in a place with a red table, their only regret
was they ended up paying out the nose for red chalk.

NightMist
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Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

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