quilt binding

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I posted this over at 'that other place' and want to share it with those of  
you who don't go there. I've always loved the look of hand-stitched quilt  
binding but this looks pretty good to me. What do you think?  
http://latetocreate.com/2013/02/23/quilting-binding-tutorial-by-machine/
Polly  


Re: quilt binding

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I love doing machine bindings on kids and baby quilts.  I figure they  
will last longer than my hand stitching.  I've used different stitches  
as well as just a plain old straight stitch and they all look nice.

marcella

Re: quilt binding
In article  

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DItto for me -- kid quilts and baby quilts need that extra strength. I  
also have used different decorative stitches; the feather stitch is one  
of my favorites for this job.

--  
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
http://www.sandymike.net
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: quilt binding
  I do almost all my bindings completely by machine. I enjoy hand  
quilting and hand applique, but do not enjoy sewing binding down by  
hand. I use a variation of Sharon Schamber's method. I stitch the  
binding to the front of the quilt. Then I turn it to the back and glue  
it down with a fine line of Elmer's School Glue, making sure the folded  
edge covers the stitching line by a bit. I use my iron to "seal" the  
glue as I go. Then I turn it over and stitch in the ditch from the  
front. I don't use glue to baste it down on the top like Sharon does.  
The glue washes out, which isn't a problem for me, because I wash  
everything after I'm done. Unless you look carefully, you can't see on  
the top that it is done by machine. I think it is more sturdy for quilts  
that will be used and washed often.

Julia in MN

On 2/27/2013 9:47 AM, Polly Esther wrote:
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Re: quilt binding
On Wed, 27 Feb 2013 09:47:59 -0600, Polly Esther wrote:

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I most wholeheartedly am for anything that is done by machine rather than  
by hand.  The only problem is that to make my machine do the stitch  
required I would have to mess around with the cams to get the required  
stitch, or at least as close as I can come, that is, if I can find them.  
My machine is not electronic.

As an aside, one of the things that I prefer doing by hand is sewing on a  
button.  The manual for my machine (if I could find that) gives  
instructions for sewing on a button, but I think getting out the machine  
for this purpose is way too much trouble (I tried it once when I was able  
to find the manual).

Well, anyway, I have been missing a button from my favorite shirt for  
several months, and it the shirt even has a spare button sewn to the  
inside of the shirt like many do these days.

However, because of inertia and a general dislike of hand sewing, I have  
not sewn on the button.  The recent message about getting a sewing  
machine (I think it was your message, Polly) inspired me to get out a  
needle and fix it, but I cannot right now find my hand sewing needles.

I will no doubt find them as soon as I get to the store to get some new  
ones.

Brian Christiansen

Re: quilt binding
It's a little early but I'm thinking we just must come begin our Easter Egg  
hunt at your house.  Can't find the cams?  Can't find the hand needles?  
Don't make us come down there. I well remember the struggle to  
store/keep/find things. Begin with just ten minutes and just one  
drawer/box/bin. It is lovely to know where everything is - but wishing won't  
make it so. And it won't stay in place by itself. It takes time and what my  
Moma would call 'Hell bent' determination. Whatever that is. Polly  


Re: quilt binding
On the rare occasion that I make a garment and need to sew on a lot of
buttons, it's worth setting up the machine IMO. But a single button
takes about half a minute. Go ahead and get yourself some nice new
needles. Buy a bunch of other cool tools, maybe a perfect pair of
little thread snippers and a really beautiful thimble. Get some
antique sewing tols if you can. Set them all up in a good-looking
sewing box and call it a decorator item. then you'll always know where
your mending kit is hiding.
Roberta in D

On Wed, 27 Feb 2013 23:31:31 +0000 (UTC), Brian

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Re: quilt binding
Nice site!
I often do machine binding, usually with a straight stitch. With care
and a little practice, it will fall right into the ditch on one side.
The only other thing I would add: it pays to stitch down the corner
miters by hand before doing the machine stitching. Takes only a few
minutes, looks super-neat  and saves lots of fiddling.
Roberta in D

On Wed, 27 Feb 2013 09:47:59 -0600, "Polly Esther"

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Re: quilt binding
I absolutely agree with Roberta on that.  I do my binding the usual one  
- machine one side and hand the other.  However, I always sew all the  
corners first - then zoom along the straight bits!  I do the hand-sewing  
of the corners first also.
.
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--  
Best Regards
Pat on the Green

Re: quilt binding
Dose anyone know what the new sole - "stitch in the ditch" foot is? See  
Rebecca's message below.

Quoting Rebecca Grace from the website:
Do you have that new sole for your walking foot that helps you stitch  
exactly in the ditch? I just found out about it and got one from my dealer,  
but haven't had a chance to use it yet. I wonder if it would be helpful with  
this technique or not? Hmmm.

Thanks Polly - this will save me hours and hours of cramped fingers.

Di


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Re: quilt binding
Please don't bother - I googled Janome and found exactly what she meant - at  
$90-00 approx. I will be saving up for one.

Di
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Re: quilt binding
Yikes!  Not sure what Janome machine you have, but the accufeed ditch  
quilting foot is only $27.99 at Brubakers.

http://brubakerssewing.com/store/index.php/accufeed-ditch-quilting-foot.h
tml

If you're a member of the janome 6500-6600 group there's a %15 discount  
too.

marcella




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Re: quilt binding
I went to this website  
http://www.thecolorfulworldofsewing.com/Deluxe-Two-Sole-Walking-Foot-for-Janome.html
I have a walking foot for my machine which I paid appox. $25 for a few years  
ago.
It's the open toe that I would like. After doing a lot more research last  
night, I am going to look for just the open toe sole - hoping they can be  
bought separately.

Di



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Re: quilt binding

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I have the Bernina version of that new sole for my walking foot. There's  
a slight learning curve, since it's somewhat larger than the  
"in-the-ditch" foot that isn't part of the walking foot. However, it  
does work, and I like it. It certainly wasn't anywhere close to $90,  
either, for the one I bought.

--  
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
http://www.sandymike.net
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: quilt binding
I think it's a foot that has a guide to go in the ditch. Here's one from  
amazon that's supposed to fit a lot of machines:  
<(Amazon.com product link shortened)>.
 

Here's a link to Janome's  
<http://content.janome.com/index.cfm/Machines/Accessories/All/Ditch_Quilting_Foot .
 

  I suspect other companies have them too. The blind hem foot for my  
Elna also has a similar guide and I have used it for SITD, but find it  
just as easy (or maybe easier) to use my open toe embroidery foot so I  
can see exactly where I am stitching.

Julia in MN

On 3/1/2013 5:59 AM, Di Maloney wrote:
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Re: quilt binding
The slot where you slide the little arm on my Janome walking foot broke  
and I missed it so bought a new foot. It included a SID guide which I  
thought would be brilliant but found I prefer to 'eyeball' it! I am glad  
to have the little arm for parallel lines though.

Sally at the Seaside ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~uk
http://picasaweb.google.com/SallySeaside

On 01/03/2013 20:07, Julia in MN wrote:
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<(Amazon.com product link shortened)>.
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<http://content.janome.com/index.cfm/Machines/Accessories/All/Ditch_Quilting_Foot .
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Re: quilt binding
Mine was Janome Convertible Even Feed Foot Set Ref: 214517004 and comes  
with two sole plates - closed and open. I shopped around and found it  
much cheaper than Janome charge.

Sally at the Seaside ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~uk
http://picasaweb.google.com/SallySeaside

On 01/03/2013 20:26, Sally Swindells wrote:
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