Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots

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What's the best way to remove discoloration from the white enamel
interior?  We love our pot, but even though it's clean, it has some
browning on the bottom.  What's safe to use?  Baking soda?  Salt and
lemon?  Bon Ami?  Barkeeper's Friend?  Le Cruset sells a special
cleaner, but if it's something simple in a fancy package, it'd be good
to know.

Thanks!
Monique in TX

Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots


I'm a fan of Barkeeper's Friend and have never known it to harm anything -
but before you work yourself too hard, try a Very diluted amount of bleach.
Fill the pan with water and add about one tablespoon of bleach and see if
that does the deed.  That's how I keep my big red pasta pot as pretty as
new.  Polly


"monique" <wrote> What's the best way to remove discoloration from the white
enamel
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Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots


Thanks!  I'll give it a try.

Monique

Polly Esther wrote:
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Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots


I have a discolored Le Creuset dutch oven and I've tried everything
imaginable to clean it and nothing works.  I've tried bleach, baking
soda, Comet, etc.  I just live wiih the brown bottom.  

I also have a couple Le Creuset knock offs from QVC, which were
drastically less expensive, and they never stain, no matter what I cook
in them.  They work just as well as the Le Creuset.  

Denise


Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots


I put some baking soda in the bottom of the pot -- about a quarter cup
or a bit more in a dutch oven and less for a smaller pot -- and add
about a half inch of hot water.  Then I put it on the counter and
leave it overnight.  On the very rare occasions that doesn't work I
just figure "what the hell, it's clean" and forget it.

Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots


This is a great attitude.  I wish you had been my mama!
TAria

Mary wrote:
  On the very rare occasions that doesn't work I
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Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots


Don't know about enameled cookware specifically, but I have gotten some
absolutely horrid stains from plastic things and other types of kitchen
stuff by using dry dishwasher soap. I have only tried this with the
crystalline type of dishwasher soap, others might work, but I don't
know. Have your tap water as hot as it can get. Sprinkle some of the
dishwater soap into the container/pitcher/pan, and use more than you
think you might want to, I use a good couple of tablespoons for a 1
gallon pitcher. Using a long handled brush or dish mop swish it around
as you add hot water. This dissolves the soap and starts things working.
When full enough to cover the stained area, let sit until the water
cools. Use a "scrubby" and rub all around the stain. Should remove quite
a bit of it, if not all of it, if it works. <G> As I say, I have done
this with Tupperware iced tea pitchers that have had too many batches
made, one on another without a good scrubbing in between. Works very
well. <VBG>

Pati, in Phx

monique wrote:
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Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots


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***********************************************************
Pati's experience is in keeping with Polly's comment about using
diluted bleach.
The stain-removing ingredient in Cascade is bleach.

I keep a spray bottle of diluted bleach under the kitchen sink.  I
have all-white counter tops and cabinets that show everything. (Which
is probably good, because I wipe them often to get rid of what
shows, and thus get rid of nasty stuff.  (Remember the dye
tablets given to kids to chew to demonstrate how well or poorly they
brushed their teeth?  Something like that to show how well or poorly
you've cleaned would be interesting ... or guilt-inducing.)) (My
kitchen
floor is oak parquet which reveals all too little.)

Cheryl Mendelson's "Home Comforts: The Art and Science of
Keeping House" tells not only how but also why (physics/chemistry).
You can find it in the 640's @ you-know-where.

Nann



Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots


I have the same issues.........there is a cleaner just for the pots but I
don't know what is in it.......it's what I was going to tell you about but
then I re-read your message ;-)

Laurie G. in CA

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Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots


You could try denture cleaning tablets, such as Efferdent. Put in enough
hot water to cover the stains, drop in a tablet or two, and leave it set
for awhile. I've used it to remove coffee and tea stains from pitchers,
mugs, and thermos. It also works well for cleaning flower vases.

Julia in MN

monique wrote:
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Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots


Yes, what Julia said.  There is also a powdered denture cleaner called
Stain-Away that is more powerful than the tablets.

Also, my sister is a big fan of Oxy-clean (which I think is pretty much the
same thing as denture cleaner, though of course I could be wrong) and she
swears it will clean the dirt/grease/stains off almost anything.  It's
certainly non-abrasive and would not hurt the finish on your pot.  Don't mix
it with a chlorine bleach, though!  One of my brothers did that, and had a
heck of a mess in the laundry room, LOL!

--
Carolyn in The Old Pueblo

If it ain't broke, you're not trying.  --Red Green
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Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots


I love my Cruset cookware!  It's rather heavy though; my son asked me if I
"bought my pans by the pound".  He was helping with the dishes at the time.
Ha!
I use the Cruset cleaner, don't know what's in it, but it works really well.
And it only takes a little bit to clean them.  I wouldn't want to use
anything to void the lifetime warranty.
Good Luck,
Michelle

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Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots


BonAmi is great..never scratches !..and I use it on my glass topped
stove, sinks, Corian counters and sink, even tried it on some
sterling silver earrings once and worked great there too .


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Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots


monique wrote:
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I used to find that not only did the enamel discolour badly, but it also
lost the glassy surface after a while, and became porous.  Not good.
Things stuck like glue to them and they looked dreadful.  I had a lovely
set as wedding prezzies, and to keep them looking good as long as I
could, I did what the Le cruset shop advised This WAS 26 years ago!) and
used oven cleaner on them when they really got bad.  The ARE enamel,
after all, and so long as you wash it all off carefully, there is no
problem.

Eventually I got rid of most of them (I kept a small milk pan and the
large saute pan), but replaced the rest with stainless steel.  MUCH
better!  Lighter, easier to clean, and dishwasher proof!  I wouldn't
mind a nice cast iron casserole, but I can manage without, so unless I
see one for a fiver or less in a charity shop, I'll stick with what I have.

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Bakelite [was Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots]


I have done what Patti C said. hot water and lots of dishwashing soap,
let sit until cooled. Use a scrubby made for teflon, so it doesn't
scratch the enamel.

On another subject, does anyone around this cyber quilting frame know
where I can go to get a bakelite knob for my dutch oven? It has a
knob, not handle on top. Knob has finally split. It is such a nice
size for making soups and stews in. There is a threaded screw that
comes through the lid into base of knob.

Ginger in CA

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Re: Bakelite [was Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots]


I see one over at www.Sporeworks.com    It says it's a wingnut or something
and then another one down a few steps that says it's a handle.  Either of
them work for you?  Polly


"Ginger in CA" <wrote, in part>On another subject, does anyone around this
cyber quilting frame know
where I can go to get a bakelite knob for my dutch oven? It has a
knob, not handle on top. Knob has finally split. It is such a nice
size for making soups and stews in. There is a threaded screw that
comes through the lid into base of knob.




Re: Bakelite [was Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots]


Dunno, Polly. Think I will have to call them and see what diameter
screw the knob needs.

How ever do you find these things????

Ginger in CA
thanks!

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Re: Bakelite [was Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots]


I'd take it to the local hardware store and see if they have anything
like that.

Julia in MN

Ginger in CA wrote:
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Re: Bakelite [was Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots]


Not sure of a Bakelite replacement, but you might be able to make one
from either a wooden spool (Check a hobby section/shop in the wood aisle
<G>) or make one from one of the polymer clays (Fimo/Sculpy type).
Pati, in Phx

Ginger in CA wrote:
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Re: Bakelite [was Re: Totally OT: Le Cruset and other enameled cast iron pots]


The manufacturer should be able to help you out with replacement parts
and accessories.  If they don't have an internet storefront on their
website - use the 'contact us' link to ask them specifically for the
part that you need - take measurements of the knob that you need.
Sometimes repair depots in your local area also have replacement knobs
that are generic for pots and pans.  jennellh

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