220 Transformer

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There is a good chance that you have 220 volts available at the circuit
breaker box.  If you could get someone to run wiring from the box to your
sewing area you'd be in business.

Don Dando



Re: 220 Transformer

Don Dando skrev:

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And fried as well! Electricity is best delt with by certified
electricians, not "home fix-it" types.

Erin
(who lives with an electrical engineer)
http://arkivarie.livejournal.com /


Re: 220 Transformer
Erin wrote:
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You're both right.  Getting 220 is a matter of putting in a double
breaker, uniting two 110 lines, as is done for an electric range or
electric dryer.  It's a simple thing to do, provided there is room in
the existing breaker box to add the circuit.  But adding circuits is not
a job for a neophyte, although done correctly it is perfectly safe.

I once had to explain how to do this to a contractor who had dug a well
for me, and was installing the pump.  He didn't believe me, of course,
since I was a "feemale" - but he went and talked to another contractor,
then came back and quietly put in the double breaker and hooked up my
pump.
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: 220 Transformer
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circuit
your
not

Wherein lies the problem. European homes receive 220v power (and in some
cases up to 400v) by a single line, whereas in the United States one has
two. This is why you can run European appliances from a converter, but
not say an American 220v dryer.

If all one needs is straight 220v  power to run a small Euro appliance,
then what you want is a "step-up/step-down" converter. These come in
ranges from about 500v to 3000v, and will convert 220v/240v power to
110v/120v and vice versa. However these converters will not change
frequency, that is convert 60hz to 50hz or vice versa. This can be done
but is a very expensive (and large) converter.

For most items running on 60hz is not a problem, the unit will just run
slightly faster. My Pfaff ironer is 220v/50hz, and runs just fine on
American 220v/60hz power. The only problem areas are things such as
computers, things with internal clocks, and most large appliances like
washing machines. What will happen in those cases is the motor will run
fast and over time cause stress/burn itself out.

When purchasing a step-up/down converter, size your unit about 10% or so
larger than the power top power draw from the appliance you will be
using. This allows for a buffer zone to prevent burning out the
converter.

Those small "cheap" plug in transformers from Radio Shack and such are
NOT meant to handle more than 10amps of power. They are fine for blow
dryers, clocks, and such but not for appliances that draw large power
loads. You will not only risk burning them out, but your appliance and
possibly your home as well.

As for adding a 220v line, it is because it is so "simple" for a good
electrician, you won't find many who will do it at a reasonable price.
The job easily takes a morning tops, with no complications, but most
electricians we found would rather book an entire days work rather than
do "small beer" jobs. What often happens is the licensed electrician
comes out to give an estimate, but sends an appetence or "helper" to do
the work. Whatever you do make sure you have it in writing that a
licensed electrician will be doing the work, and not contracted out to
just anyone.



Re: 220 Transformer
Candide wrote:
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I found this to be true of all the contractors.  They don't want to do
small jobs, they want big jobs - construction, preferably.  It's
difficult to even get a bid on a remodal or renovation.  Fortunately,
here in Reno, there is a small company with electricians who do nothing
but small jobs, less than a day's worth.  They do have a minimum charge,
but are all very pleasant people and cheerfully do little jobs.  I liked
their old business name - "The Electric Company" but they gave it up and
I think they are now a franchise - Mr. Electric.  NAYY, I've just used
their service and have always been pleased.  BTW, one of their best
electricians I've had do work for me is a woman.
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: 220 Transformer
Except Euro 220 is 50 hz and US is 60hz


--
Ron Anderson A1 Sewing Machine
PO Box 60, Sand Lake, NY 12153
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Re: 220 Transformer
Ron Anderson wrote:
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Don't some countries use DC instead of AC, as well?

--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: 220 Transformer
I suppose some do, probably third world.
However Hertz is relative only to AC (alternating current) it is the numbers
of times the current switches directions in a second. Should not be to much
of a problem unless it is an electronic machine.

--
Ron Anderson A1 Sewing Machine
PO Box 60, Sand Lake, NY 12153
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Re: 220 Transformer
Ron Anderson wrote:
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The only use of DC would likely be for very small scale local electric use (like
wind or solar PV charging batteries).  This is done in some African and other
countries.  No fridges and air conditioners there - just very basic light, radio
or cell phone.  Large scale DC is very inefficient.

Electric motors might have a problem with the difference between 50 and 60 Hz if
they sync their speed to the main power frequency.  That means that the speed of
a European machine could run 20% higher on North American power.  You might need
a light touch on the foot pedal.  I also understand that this could result in
heating problems in some devices, but I can't say for sure.

Electronic machines shouldn't be much of a problem, since the electronics will
be run off low voltage DC generated from the mains just like your computer.

I just looked at my serger - it requires 120 watts.  If the 110-220VAC converter
you use is able to handle at least that kind of power you should be fine.  Check
the label on the back/bottom of the machine and see what the wattage
requirements are.

Mike

Re: 220 Transformer
wrote:

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Haven't found any yet, but did find this link which also lists what
type of plug(s) are used in each country.  Btw, take a look at the
notes for Japan, seems they use 50hz in some cities, and 60Hz in
others.

http://kropla.com/electric2.htm

Re: 220 Transformer

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Hi Ron, now I'm worried. Irt is a Husqvarna  Huskylock 460ED and does indeed
run on 50 hz.  I have ordered the converter, more than large enough to run
it but will it ruin my machine?  I plan on taking it back to Norway in one
year and don't want to have it permanently changed. We are leasing a house
here so I also can't make permanent changes to the electrical system.

Kirsten Sollie



Re: 220 Transformer
I see no reason it should do damage. it will run a bit faster but that
should not hurt it in the short term


--
Ron Anderson A1 Sewing Machine
PO Box 60, Sand Lake, NY 12153
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Re: 220 Transformer

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Faster sounds better to me!

Kirsten Sollie



Re: 220 Transformer
Not always good. If you are pushing the limits of the machines rating, wears
faster.


--
Ron Anderson A1 Sewing Machine
PO Box 60, Sand Lake, NY 12153
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: 220 Transformer
Ron Anderson wrote:
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When dd was moving to England with her husband who was posted there for
four years, she was advised to either pack up and store most of her
appliances, or to sell them and buy more over there.  Of course, that is
easy on an Air Force base - there are always people coming and going so
lots of people buying and selling stuff as they move from country to
country.

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Re: 220 Transformer

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Well, I did that with most of our stuff but I did bring the bread machine
(and Norwegian flour) and the overlock.  We bought new tv's and such.
Almost all the computer equipment runs on both currents!

Kirsten



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