Better way of darning holes

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I am looking for an easier way to repair holes in socks.

There has got to be a better way than sewing the holes.

Like maybe a flexible material that can be ironed over the hole?

Thanks,
          Andy

Re: Better way of darning holes


"Andy K"  wrote in message  

I am looking for an easier way to repair holes in socks.

There has got to be a better way than sewing the holes.

Like maybe a flexible material that can be ironed over the hole?

Thanks,
          Andy

I have been repairing socks for more than 50 years and the best way I have  
found has been to buy a light weight yarn of close to the same color yarn  
that you usually wear socks and use it to darn with to repair with using an  
in/out weave stitch.   I have not found a material similar to something that  
could be used to mend jeans.    Barbara  


Re: Better way of darning holes
On Friday, January 12, 2018 at 4:19:05 PM UTC-6, Bobbie Sews More wrote:
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Thanks Barbara.

Darn is much thicker than thread, so it should take less number of stitches.

Andy

Re: Better way of darning holes
Bobbie Sews More wrote:
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Funny this subject should come up this week. I just (finally)  
donated my DMIL's sewing basket.  It was full of interesting things:  
odd buttons, bits of ribbon, several wooden spools of thread,  a  
package of upholstery needles, and.... a darning egg! I'm pretty  
sure I had never seen one in the flesh before.

Beverly, who has never darned a sock in her life.  


Re: Better way of darning holes
On 13/01/2018 4:51 AM, Andy K wrote:
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Alternatively, you could look on darning as being part of the 'slow'  
movement or a zen experience.  Or even take inspiration from the  
wonderful Tom of Holland who makes darning an art form and from which he  
has built a successful little business.
https://tomofholland.com/

Re: Better way of darning holes
On Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 4:26:15 PM UTC-6, Fran wrote:
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I am going to have to order a darning needle. All I have are plain old thread ones.

Andy

Re: Better way of darning holes
On Sat, 13 Jan 2018 14:27:34 -0800 (PST), Andy K

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The difference between a darning needle and a crewel needle is that
the darning needle is longer for its thickness.  Wikipedia says that
darners have blunt tips, but all of mine are sharp.

I darn with a blunt needle, to slip between the threads instead of
piercing them.  The tapestry needles I use are shorter than the
corresponding crewel needles, which is better for nalbinding.

I have been told that interlocking rows of buttonhole stitch are
nalbinding of complexity zero.  

If the garment isn't precious enough to justify duplicate stitch,
interlocking rows of buttonhole are the only way to darn knitting.  It
stretches the same as knitting, it covers weak threads on both sides,
and you can vary the thickness by taking longer or shorter stitches,
which makes it easy to blend the darn into the undamaged fabric.

--  
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
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Re: Better way of darning holes
On Saturday, January 13, 2018 at 6:40:43 PM UTC-6, Joy Beeson wrote:
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thanks ladies for the tips.

Andy

Re: Better way of darning holes
On 1/15/2018 9:30 PM, Andy K wrote:
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Why not just buy a new pair of socks?


--  
Ron Anderson A1 Sewing Machine www.a1sewingmachine.com

Re: Better way of darning holes
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Many moons ago, when I was a kid, fusible round bits of cotton knit  
came on the market. You were supposed to darn your socks by fusing a  
patch over the hole.  Usually, by later in the day, you were walking  
on the balled-up patch.

My mother was very good at mending, but I dreaded wearing darned socks  
because I could just about guarantee I'd have a blister.  Her darning was  
flat and smooth; I learned, and my darning was flat and smooth, and gave me
blisters.  I tried a different darning technique.  Result: blisters.

Now I say, "darn holey sock!" and toss it at the rag bag, where it becomes a dust  
cloth, oil rag, serger practice piece, source of ribbing for dog coat leggings...

If it's a hand knit sock, I'll ravel the hole completely out and re-knit  
with new yarn, but I'm not darning socks.

Kay





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