crepe backed satin - Page 2

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Re: crepe backed satin
my mock up's done! yay!!!! it wasn't as easy as i thought it would be.
but since all the "figuring out's " been done, the real deal shouldn't
take as long.

I feel like such a pest, but i have one more question for you :)... so
once i sewed the lining in, and turned it rightside out, everything was
really bulky. I was able to flatten out most of the edges by pressing
and steam, but the one place where the bulk remains is at the shoulder
seams (presusumably because the shoulders contain the sleeve seams, the
bodice seams and the lining seams) I've tried to flatten it out by
pressing and while it helps some, it doesn't flatten it completely. The
instructions mentioned something called "layering" the seams... would
this be helpful? (also, what is it? lol) Or maybe clipping the seams? I
was even thinking of trimming the seam allowances but was having
daymares about the dress falling apart at the wedding!!

Thank you so much for all your help :) You and Wurstergirl really
helped me figure out this pattern :)


Re: crepe backed satin
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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Did they mean 'grading'?  That's trimming down the different seam
allowances to different widths so they lie flatter, with no hard
edges...  Clipping goes from the cut edge *almost* to the seam - but not
THROUGH it!  It works even better if you clip the different layers in
different places, so the clips are off-set from each other.  :)  Both
help to make things lie flatter, look smoother, and reduce bulk where it
isn't wanted.
--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: crepe backed satin
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:
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No, No, NOOO!!  This is *exactly* what this NG is for, and I am quite
enjoying reading about your project.

Re: crepe backed satin
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:
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Hi Ena,

Sounds like you're having a good go at that dress. Layering or GRADING
(as it is often refered to) is trimming the seam allowances so they are
all different to get a flatter look.

So, if you have 4 layers of fabric in a seam, leave layer 1 alone, trim
1/8" off layer 2, trim 1/4" of layer 3 and trim 3/8" off layer 4. Then
press your seam - see - much flatter! Might be something you want to
make a couple of little test samples of to practice on. The main thing I
find with doing this is to watch were your scissors are going! It can be
*so* easy to have accidents and cut what you shouldn't! (BTDTGTTS!). Cut
across corners at 45deg to get the bulk out of them.

Clipping and notching of the seams is to help ease fabric round curves.
Clip for an outward curve, notch for an inward. The tighter the curve,
the closer the spacing of the clips and notches.

These techniques are illustrated in Readers Digests Sewing, and other
sewing books - perhaps worth checking out your library? SOme of these
things are much easier to see inpictures than words!

HTH

Sarah

Re: crepe backed satin
Sorry to have missed your question this morning.  I concur with Kate
that you're better off with the lightweight interfacing.  With the
understitching it should do a nice job.  

POra


Re: crepe backed satin
had i known crepe backed satin would be this much of a pain i rpobably
would have picked something else!

just curious though, what does "dropping' mean? is this actually
hanging the bias so that it can stretch?

Thanks a bunches!


Re: crepe backed satin
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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Yup 0 that's it exactly!  :)  It WILL stretch, so let it: the garment
will hang much better.

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

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