Fabric choice

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All,
I've purchased a few items on ebay recently and I need to make a lining to
an open weave sweater and a shell like 'blouse' that I would need to attach
to a skirt.   In my overweight state I have a droopy waistline.  The shell
would serve like a dress would to keep the skirt at a level 'waistline'.
So the question becomes, what lining material is the most comfortable and
breathable?  (I perspire abundantly, family trait)  If  this cannot be
accomplished by a traditional apparel lining fabric would a drapery lining
work?
Awaiting your responses,
AK in PA



Re: Fabric choice
AK&DStrohl wrote:
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How about Bemberg rayon?

http://www.denverfabrics.com/pages/static/lining_fabric.htm

"Bemberg Rayon Lining

Bemberg is a lining that breathes and can be washed and dried by
machine. It is engineered to be anti-cling and it resists
wrinkles. It wears well and has a soft silky hand.

Because it resists wrinkling at the knees and in the seat area,
Bemberg makes a good lining for skirts and slacks. Rayon
breathes, allowing finished garments to be more comfortable."

Another source:

http://www.srfabrics.com/other/bemberg.htm

I can vouch for the excellent service at denverfabrics.com.

NAYY,

Beverly



Re: Fabric choice
BEI Design wrote:
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It depends on what the shell is made of, and how you plan to launder or
clean it.  I like 100% cotton batiste for lining things like that IF it
is compatible with the face fabric.

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Re: Fabric choice
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I'm one of those people if it can't be washed and dried in a machine and not
need ironing I don't want it.
AK in PA



Re: Fabric choice
AK&DStrohl wrote:
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Me, too.  So, I wash fabric before cutting it.  If it doesn't survive,
it goes in the rag bin.  It's amazing how many fabrics that claim to be
dry-clean only, wash very well.  There is often some shrinkage, though.

--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: Fabric choice
AK&DStrohl wrote:
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Have you thought of silk?

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: Fabric choice
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Bemberg
Cotton Batiste

I'll finalize my choice when I actually go to look for the fabric.  What
feels
good, has a nice hand, coordinates well and has a good price.

Unless it is really unwashable and I know this ahead of time, I wash and
machine dry everything before I cut it.   Not only to find out its
washability but I am very sensitive to some chemicals.  Which ones?  Who
knows.
The only other reason I might not wash a fabric before hand is that it would
be better to do it that way for the purpose of cutting and sewing the
material.

I'll keep all the suggestions I get in mind.
AK in PA



Re: Fabric choice
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If these are knit instead of woven, I'd match a knit lining to them -- my
choice would be a silkweight wicking polyester.

Otherwise, this list may help:

Heat retention of fibers, from best to worst (so you want poor heat retention --
go for something low on the list):
wool
acrylic
polyester
olefin
nylon
aramid
silk
spandex
linen
cotton
rayon
acetate
  (Kadolf, et al. 1993.  Textiles, 7th ed.  Macmillan)


  1) this is a list of fibers, not fabrics--a closely woven fabric
     of a "cool fiber" can be warmer than a not so closely woven
     fabric of a "warmer fiber".  A textured weave may be more
     comfortable than a plain weave.  
  2) these are for unmodified fibers.  Some of the engineered fabrics
     can be remarkably comfortable under certain conditions.  For instance,
     a cotton t-shirt soggy with sweat and plastered to me is one of my
     unfavorite sensations.  In fairly low humidity, I find some of the
     lighter wicking polyesters (particularly the micromesh types) are
     more comfortable to me.
  3) color does play a part... white reflects light energy, black absorbs
     it.
  4) some of the fibers on the list include things that I'd sooner
     walk across hot coals barefoot than sew... acetate is a fiber I
     particularly dislike working with, fwiw.
 

Re: Fabric choice
wrote:

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Linen for lining.  You might buy the thin, coarse fabric some stores
call "handkerchief linen" -- about USD8/yd at fabric.com -- and wash
it in hot water and bleach to make it thinner and softer.  

Joy Beeson
--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/ -- sewing
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