Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?

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Is anyone able to discuss fashion fabrics for bra-making?  I'm
interested in going further than the typical solid tricots.  It sounds
like organza is a fabric of choice for sheer lining.  Does it do well
as the fashion fabric too?  I'm also considering georgette, crepe de
chine, charmeuse, and cotton-poly eyelet.  Also, is rayon cooler
overall than polyester?  Pros and cons anyone?  It occurs to me to
consider nylon, too....

Thx,
Pora


Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
wurstergirl wrote:
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Just curious, are you going to have a message forum on your web site?
If so, it seems to me that maybe you might want to postpone these types
of extensive discussions until you can preserve them there, because you
can't copy from NG discussions wholesale onto your web site.

I know this is totally off the wall, but I'm very, very sick and my
brain is fuzzy and when you asked this all I could think about is how
some talk show host said in his memoirs that he never spoke with his
guests before they came on the show since discovering that the few times
he did that, the best parts of the discussion never made it to the show.

Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
I hear you, Melinda.  (She's referring to www.theBraConnection.com, my
site on bras for the hard-to-fit woman.)  In fact, the forum is up and
running right now, but the rest of the site is not looking good.  I'd
prefer to invite you all over once I'm sure that the frustration factor
is low enough that y'all won't leave in a huff, never to return.


Yeah, I should be saving this up for our forum, but I'm so impatient.
I'll only ask a few questions and then hold off so we can continue
later.  I'm guessing we still have another month or two before I'd feel
comfortable having you guys over.

Pora


Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?

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This is a great topic for discussion. :)  Personally, I think you should
try any fabric you want!  The best way to tell how it will feel against
your skin, before using it in a bra, is to cut a square (after washing
it) and put it inside your bra for a time to see if it itches or is
otherwise uncomfortable.  

I think rayon is more comfortable than poly but I have no idea how it
would hold up in a bra.  I bought some very fine emerald green rayon
challis last week for other things and it has a very soft, light hand
after washing.  So it seems like it might make a *comfortable* bra.  
OTOH, rayon can hold a lot of water so that would also be a
consideration.  Durability is definitely a factor with bras for women
who are more than adequately endowed.  Those bras must be able to take a
lot of strain.

Nothing wrong with plain old cotton either--- especially if you want
that plaid or Island print bra.  I saw a lot of polka dots on Denver
Fabrics' page the other day...  :)   I've used a very wide variety of
fabrics for lingerie.  If I was going to do this by mail order, I'd get
large samples of a bunch of different fabric types.  For myself, I
generally draw on my own stash.  Did you ever try Logan Kits?  She sells
lingerie fabric remnants by the pound too--- or used to--- very cheap.  
Not just kits.  She gets factory remnants IIRC but it has been more than
a few years since I bought anything form her.  I recommend writing to
her and telling her you are looking for bra-making fabrics to see if she
has anything that you could use.  She always had a lot of nylon tricot
as I recall.  I still have some gorgeous laces that I got from her.

<http://www.logankits.com/

Phae

--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI, Shakespeare)

Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
In article

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I forgot to say, have a look at her brochure... you can download it.

--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI, Shakespeare)

Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
Good idea about wearing a swatch inside your bra.

I've been eyeing the Logan Kits grab bags.  As soon as I feel like I've
got one great bra under my belt (?!) it will be great fun to try one of
those out.  My I-cup girlfriend who I'm going to try to sew for will
love to see something other than beige tricot!!

And hey, I'm taking that plaid cotton as a challenge, girl!  ;-)  lol

Pora


Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
On Sat, 29 Apr 2006 09:39:13 -0500, Phaedrine


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After having made corsets, includeing overbusts, for a while now I
finally got around to trying a plain bra.
I am never going to buy one off the shelf again!
Custom fit is sooooo much more comfy!  As in most clothes.

For fabrics I totally endorse cotton. For comfort it is hard to beat.
Plus, since I am generously endowed I want something sturdy.  Cotton
does the trick.
But I am vain and one of those pretentious goth people, so I want
attractive with my functionality and comfort.
I have taken to basicly making the straps (except for the spandex
triangles for movement in the back straps) and at least the lower half
of the cups in plain cotton, then covering it in something prettier.
Since I do much of my own dyeing and surface design I can make the
pretty part out of silk quite cheaply.
I highly endorse renaissance lace or similar techniques for
embellishment, it is by far the most comfortable as well as being easy
to do and very attractive.

NightMist
--
The wolf that understands fire has much to eat.

Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
For plain cotton, do you use batiste , flannel or just muslin?  Are
there wrinkling issues after every washing?  I'm inclined to go with
cotton-poly blends for the durability.  I'm all for layering fashion
over function too, especially since I'm going to be making bras for my
I-cup friend as well as for myself.  There's no reason one can't
enclose the seam allowances between the cups, right?  Thanks for the
renaissance lace tip.  

POra


Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
wurstergirl wrote:
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I used lightweight poplin for one, and it was great.

Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
wrote:

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I have done one in a lightweight flannel and it feels so nice!
Might be a bit warm for summer though.  Plain muslin (I'm useing a 4
ounce for this) works very well indeed.  I have been petting some
light sand washed broadcloth and having notions.
I prewash the devil out of my fabrics, as much abuse as I dare for the
given weave and fiber. Wrinkleing or shrinkage has not been an issue
for me. A bit of mild rumpleing, but that smooths out once you have
the thing on.

No reason at all not to enclose the seams, save perhaps weight and
bulk.  The usual stuff, depends on your exact construction and fabric.

Since you are making them to fit, there is also no reason to make the
shoulder straps adjustable either.  Unless of course you are embarking
on a course of bodybuilding or an extreme diet :)

NightMist
--
The wolf that understands fire has much to eat.

Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
That sand-washed broadcloth sounds excellent.  It's good to hear that
difficulties with wrinkling and shrinkage "come out in the wash" so to
speak!

I"m not sure about making strap length permanent.  I find that I adjust
my straps regularly.  But I'll ask the other ladies I'll be bra-making
for.  It would save the effort of finding or dyeing strap elastic to
match.

As an aside, the bra I started making last night feels like it's made
of butcher paper.  I fused the fashion stretch georgette to an organza
layer for stability and ended up with something you could wrap around
last night's fish!  I've only sewn one cup, so maybe I'll switch to
Sulky Solvy and just wash the bonding layer out after sewing.  (Any
opinions here?)  This is an important investigation for me, since I
have some stretch fabrics I'd like to use for both the cups and the
back wings.

Pora


Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?

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I adjust mine all the time too.

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If you need a temporary bond, would that spray stuff used for embroidery
or temporarily bonding quilt layers (instead of basting or pinning)
work?  I have not used it so I don't know.  And I also don't know how it
reacts with various fabrics but I thought I'd just throw the idea out
there.

Phae

--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI, Shakespeare)

Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
Yes, I figured such a thing must exist but know nothing about its
performance.  There are several quilting shops nearby, so maybe they'd
know.  Sounds easier to use than the wash-out fusible.  If there is a
kind that washes out too.

P.


Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
Phaedrine wrote:

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http://www.sprayandfix.com/505.html

Good stuff. I've used it for quilts and applique.

The only potential problem I can think of is "strike through", whereby
the adhesive would go through the organza to the layer behind. You
could get round that by spraying it onto the other fabric rather than
the organza, I would think.

Look at the FAQ at the link above for information about how long it
lasts.

Sally Holmes
Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England

Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?

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You see this stuff discussed all the time on the quilting forums.  
Between this kind of product and that Avery micro-tach tool, it looks
like the drudgery of pin-basting quilts is on the wane.  I like that it
has no CFCs but I sure wish I knew what was in it.  In particular, I
wondered whether there was any wheat/gluten starch like some of the
spray starches.... Or any dangerous chemicals.

Phae

--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI, Shakespeare)

Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
On Mon, 01 May 2006 09:17:57 -0500, Phaedrine

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I happen to have a can of the June Tailor brand to hand.
Reading the lable and having used it I can tell you it is what we used
to call tac one in art classes, a standard repositionable high tack
adhesive that will mostly wash out.  I don't know if they have added
starch to it for sewing, but I don't see why they would.

Other than that check out what else is listed in ingredients (in order
from the can):

Hexane
Acetone
Propane
Isobutane

Not something you want within a mile of delicate synthetics!

NightMist
--
The wolf that understands fire has much to eat.

Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
I've purchased some Sulky Solvy.  It's a rinse-away stabilizer. It's
not fusible, but it has directions for dissolving in water for brush-on
application.  I'm intending to try stabilizing just enough of the edges
of the stretch fabric to cover SAs and topstitching allowances.  Since
it's intended for garment sewing I hope it's not too toxic.  And less
fumes either way.

Pora


Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
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I'm pretty sure Solvy is a film of PVA, polyvinyl acetate.  Major ingredient of
white glues.  You may find that something like Elmer's School Glue works as
well and is cheaper.

Kay

--
NewsGuy.Com 30Gb $9.95 Carry Forward and On Demand Bandwidth

Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?
  snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist) wrote:

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... or your lungs!

--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI, Shakespeare)

Re: Fashion Fabrics for Bra-Making?

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A good thought, but IME it doesn't work for beans on synthetics.
Unless it is a low percentage stretch and a high percentage natural
fiber it wouldn't stick very well.  
Nasty fumes too, it is a use in a well ventilated area then have a
cuppa while you come down off the glue buzz kind of product.

NightMist
--
The wolf that understands fire has much to eat.

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