Fleece scraps

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It is very hard for me to throw away fabric scraps, to the point that
there are way too many of them stashed in this house.  It is also true
that dogs love fleece blankets on their beds during cold weather, even
in the house.

So every couple of years I dig out assorted bags of fleece scraps, with
my rotary cutter cut reasonably sized strips and rectangles, and then
join them by butting the raw edges together and stitching with a
three-step zigzag.  Of course this results in some improbable
combinations of colors and patterns, but so far no one has complained.  :)

I just finished four approximately 34" x 40" double blankets (eight
patchwork pieces zigzagged two back-to-back about a half inch from the
edge) that probably will go to DGDs (dear granddogs), since the ones I
made a couple of years ago for our three are still in good shape.

http://pair.com/threets/dogblankie.jpg

This seems to me like a good way to use fleece pieces that otherwise
might be wasted.  A layer of fleece patchwork backed with something like
windstop nylon might make a great stadium blanket, or a pleasing color
combination could even be a snuggly couch throw.

Doreen in Alabama

Re: Fleece scraps
If these were made larger & double thickness, they would also be good
as donations to the local homeless shelter.  Fleece is very warm,
lightweight, and forgiving if it gets damp -- Sounds to me like it
would be a winner for homeless people...

me

wrote:

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Re: Fleece scraps


Doreen wrote:
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Doreen you are so amazingly creative, I love that!

Beverly



Re: Fleece scraps
BEI Design wrote:
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Thank you, Beverly!  It's fun to do a project now and then that goes
together fast and doesn't require much concentration or skill.

Doreen in Alabama


Re: Fleece scraps
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Actually, I made quilts of this size for my babies before they were
newborn. This size is perfect for a baby of younger than 6 months old.
The receiving blankets were too thin and too long. My babies were tiny
so I wanted something solid to hold them. They practically lived on
these for the first six months. Of course I made them out of soft
cotton fabric remnants and old cotton dresses etc.


Re: Fleece scraps
Yes, you need to be careful, as you should never use fleece for
blankets for babies or small children.

me

On Thu, 25 Oct 2007 07:32:39 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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Re: Fleece scraps
jusme wrote:
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Why ever not?  My boys both had polar fleece yardage cut down to size
for cot(crib) blankets - they are warm to use and they wash & dry
easily, unlike woollen cellular blankets which are traditional over
here.  They are also sold over here by the major nursery suppliers such
as Mothercare.

Lizzy

Re: Fleece scraps
Because they can get over the child's head and cause anoxic brain
damage.  This is irreversible and has happened to a number of infants
and small children.

me

On Thu, 25 Oct 2007 16:19:13 +0100, Lizzy Taylor
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Re: Fleece scraps
jusme wrote:
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As can any bedding.  That is why we in the UK are taught to make the bed
up with only enough length of blanket & sheet to go up to the chin of
the child.  "Feet to foot" is the name we use for that technique.  Our
100+ year old house (one of thousands in our town) gets pretty nippy in
the winter even with central heating so cosy bedding is a must.

Lizzy

Re: Fleece scraps

jusme wrote:
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"...has happened..."  Cite?

Or is this just unsubstantiated speculation?

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%22Fleece+causes+infant+anoxic+brain+damage%22&btnG=Search

"Your search - "Fleece causes infant anoxic brain damage" -
did not match any documents.  "



Re: Fleece scraps
No, it is not merely speculation. I am a registered nurse, and we have
seen this occur. By the same properties that cause it to be
oh-so-warm, fleece pretty much prevents air exchange (other blankets
do this to a varying lesser extent). Small children and infants do not
have the respriatory capacity to overcome the fleece should it be over
their heads for any length of time..  

Just because you don't find something on "Google" does not mean it has
not happened.

me

On Thu, 25 Oct 2007 10:04:53 -0700, "BEI Design"

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Re: Fleece scraps

jusme wrote:
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"...we have seen this occur"?  You were an actual witness to
a child smothering under a fleece blanket?  Where? When?
Let's have some facts.  Cite a newspaper article, medical
journal, etc. please.


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Just because *you say* it happened does not mean it has
happened.



Re: Fleece scraps
BEI Design wrote:
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At this point in time it is considered safer for babies to sleep without
blankets or to use a thin blanket that is tucked in and only comes up to
the chest. Babies are considered to be safer if they sleep on their back
and wear a sleeping sack rather than having a blanket. There are
articles on the web relating to SIDS. One of the many can be found here
 > http://www.sidscenter.org/SafeSleepAroundTheClock.aspx and scroll
down to

How do I make my baby's sleep area safe.

I know that for the past 9 years each of my children have been told  by
their pediatricians not to use blankets on babies and in particular to
avoid fleece except if the child is in the stroller and mom is with the
baby. That may be because fleece is generally light weight and easy for
a very young child to kick off and have it cover the baby's face.
Rather than argue the subject I prefer to avoid fleece for all infants.
I don't think anyone knows for sure what causes SIDS but I for one would
rather error on the side of caution and give a new mom a sleeping sack
like this one. https://www.halosleep.com /

Juno

Re: Fleece scraps
Juno wrote:

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When I was worried about my babies being cold in bed I dressed them in
the readily avalaible footed blanket sleepers and covered them with the
crocheted blankets made for them by my mother-in-law.  The little
receiving blankets and afghans she made were of an open enough weave
that even if a hapless infant were to somehow manage to roll
him-or-herself up like a baby burrito the child would still be able to
breathe.


Re: Fleece scraps
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I have seen and heard things that I couldn't give a cite for so I wouldn't
necessarily doubt that just because someone can't give a cite, that it
doesn't happen.

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That is also true but then I haven't ever beena ble to find anything using
google on petrified hessian either and I have both seen it and know a bit
about it.

And, as a post menopausal woaman, who cannot stand having synthetic products
near me in bed because they don't 'breathe" in the way that natural products
do, I would think that there is some sense in not having synthetics round a
very wee baby.  They can't move like an older child can.  I seem to recall
reading somewhere that overheating (rather than being too cold) was possibly
implicated as being a cause of SIDS and what Jusme has written makes some
sense to me.



Re: Fleece scraps
I recall this same discussion on this group--or maybe on the quilting
newsgroup---a couple of years ago about newborns especially not being able
to turn their heads away from the fleece and then smothering occurring.  I'm
thinking that there were 3 or 4 knowledgeable sounding posters who agreed
that fleece blankets shouldn't be used around a sleeping  infant.  There was
even a discussion about the safety of using flannel and placing a baby on
it's stomach when it isn't able to turn by itself..  I don't think I would
take the chance!  Better to be safe than sorry.
Barbara in FL




Re: Fleece scraps
Bobbie Sews Moore wrote:
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We are advised to put infants who cannot roll over to sleep on their
backs.  Once they become more mobile it is a moot point.  As soon as all
3 of my children were able to turn over they slept on their tummies by
choice.  They are now 19, 9 and 7.

Sadly we will never be able to prevent all tragedies, but common sense
and a sense of proportion are also very important.

Lizzy

Re: Fleece scraps
Lizzy Taylor wrote:
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Yet it's not all that long ago that we were admonished to always put the
baby to sleep on his stomach.  Mine were, and are healthy adults now.
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: Fleece scraps
Pogonip wrote:
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And I was advised to tightly wrap my little preemie, and
place her on her side.  ;-)  She is also a healthy adult
now.  Childcare is an evolving art.

Beverly



Re: Fleece scraps
BEI Design wrote:
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Childcare, medicine and nutrition, all change without warning.  And
often change back again.  I've about given up on trying to keep up, and
apply common sense instead.
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

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