Fray block - what's it like once dried?

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Is it hard like plastic or soft like rubber?
Would it survive in a high stress application such as a repair to jeans without
cracking?


Mike

Re: Fray block - what's it like once dried?

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I hope you will continue to stop in.  Tell us about what items you like to  
sew.  There are a few guys who stop in occasionally.  Are you one of them  
and my mind just won't remember?  I have used Fray Check on baby blankets  
and other baby items to keep the cloth threads from fraying any more.  I  
don't think it will work under stress.  There is a cloth glue that you might  
think of using to put on a patch.
Barbara in SC  



Re: Fray block - what's it like once dried?
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Fray check (in the squeeze bottle) is more like nail polish when dry; Fray Block (in the  
tube) is softer, particularly when pressed into the fabric.

Are you intending to use Fray Block as glue, or as something to keep cut or worn edges
from raveling?  The first won't work; the second will.

Holes in jeans that are highly stressed are usually a good indication you need a  
different pair of jeans that fit you better.  

Kay


Re: Fray block - what's it like once dried?
:> Is it hard like plastic or soft like rubber?
:> Would it survive in a high stress application such as a repair to jeans without
:> cracking?

:Fray check (in the squeeze bottle) is more like nail polish when dry; Fray Block (in the  
:tube) is softer, particularly when pressed into the fabric.

:Are you intending to use Fray Block as glue, or as something to keep cut or worn edges
:from raveling?  The first won't work; the second will.

:Holes in jeans that are highly stressed are usually a good indication you need a  
:different pair of jeans that fit you better.  

Or a pair that simply aren't worn out....

If Mike is looking for a no-sew patch, I'd suggest an iron on patch.
The other no-sewing-machine patch would be to sew it on by hand.  

When I mend jeans that are failing from age and wear, I usually fuse a
piece of tricot interfacing to the jean, to keep whatever structure is
left together, and then sew a patch over that, so the fusible is
entirely under the patch.  


--  
sig 48

Re: Fray block - what's it like once dried?
I'm tickled with Kay's suggestion that you need a new pair of jeans that fit  
better.  To some, jeans that have holes are quite fashionable.  Ugh. but  
really.  To another lot entirely, old comfortable jeans are dear friends.  I  
think I put something like 28 mends on our son's favorites when he got a  
spatter of battery acid.  I save very thin old pieces of jeans to mend. When  
I run out, I find a pair, any size, at a yard sale for the pleas I know are  
coming. The Bible and Dolly Parton say you just can't put new patches on old  
garments.  I simply glue stick a patch behind the disaster area just to hold  
it in place. Then I stitch up and down, back and forth.  NOT my greatest  
moment in sewing but absolutely the Most appreciated.  Polly


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Re: Fray block - what's it like once dried?
:I'm tickled with Kay's suggestion that you need a new pair of jeans that fit  
:better.  To some, jeans that have holes are quite fashionable.  Ugh. but  

You'll notice, though, that the vast majority of pre ripped jeans have
the holes in places that don't get them in normal wear, because they
don't want the clothes to fail too fast.   Holes in stressed areas
barring age and accident probably are from ill fit.

:really.  To another lot entirely, old comfortable jeans are dear friends.  I  
:think I put something like 28 mends on our son's favorites when he got a  
:spatter of battery acid.  I save very thin old pieces of jeans to mend. When  
:I run out, I find a pair, any size, at a yard sale for the pleas I know are  
:coming. The Bible and Dolly Parton say you just can't put new patches on old  
:garments.  I simply glue stick a patch behind the disaster area just to hold  
:it in place. Then I stitch up and down, back and forth.  NOT my greatest  
:moment in sewing but absolutely the Most appreciated.  Polly

Oh, I mend jeans all the time.  I've gone so far as to replace most of
the front of one leg before.  Mostly I'm dealing with more normal
stuff, worn out knees, upper thighs, shreded hems, broken belt loops
and holes in pockets though.  I've used glue sticks to stick the patch
in place; I prefer a spray stuff I've got, though.  



Re: Fray block - what's it like once dried?
Le 10/09/2013 05:09, Polly Esther a écrit :
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I use exactly that system Polly I admit to hoarding old jeans and  over  
stitching the tears, particularly for No1 son he's very hard on Jeans.


--  
Claire in Montreal FRANCE
www.claireowenperso.free.fr

Re: Fray block - what's it like once dried?
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Yup, I use tricot, too, though I don't always patch.  This is an almost worn out pair that developed a complex
triple rip -- but I wanted a bit more life out of them, so I machine darned:
http://picturetrail.com/sfx/album/view/24395076
Since then, it's survived another 30 or so wearings.

Kay


Re: Fray block - what's it like once dried?

Adult son wears bib overalls to work outside at a radio station and is  
always getting them caught on the fence and tearing them in impossible  
places.  I mend then all the time.  I  am on the look out for worn jeans at  
yard sales to use as patches.
Barbara in SC  



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