How difficult does this pattern look?

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I'm I don't know, somewhere inbw a beginner and an intermediate sewer.
I have an upcoming wedding to go to and I'd like to make this dress for
it. http://www.simplicity.com/assets/6348/6348.jpgHow difficult does
it look? Also does anyone have any experience with New Look? Do their
patterns run large? Easy to make? etc.

Thanks a bunch! :)


Re: How difficult does this pattern look?
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:
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New Looks are some of my favorites. They tend to look, well, new, and
slightly different.

You might not want to make the view with the neckline slit. IMHO the
dress doesn't need it and the slot might be tough to carry off (due to
jewelry, neckline height, other factors). THIS IS JUST MY OPINION!!!!

[sorry, got carried away by the uncouth reply in the ugly wedding dress
thread]

My favorite trick is to make dresses out of big bold distinctive
prints. That way anyone who sees it is looking at the flowers rather
than the topstitching.

HTH

--Karen D.


Re: How difficult does this pattern look?
yup that's the one i was thinking of!


Re: How difficult does this pattern look?
It's hard to tell from the drawing, but it looks like the neckline of
that style is composed of two overlapping pieces.  (What's that called
again?)  That's easier to execute and more sturdy than a slot in a
continuous piece.  It would be good to tack it closed to prevent
gapping when you bend.  Also, on the model the dot print rotates 45
degrees between the top and the skirt, so it may have a bias-cut skirt.
   Have you done one of those?  It's good to inform yourself ahead of
time what to expect, since they can be rather fussy.  They're not for
the easily frustrated, but not super advanced either.  Choosing the
right fabric can help that work out well.  [Actually, have you worn one
of them before?  They hug the body more closely than a regular grain
skirt of equivalent shape.  Shows off slender figures, or every bulge
if you're self-conscious.]  The cap sleeves don't meet all the way
under the arm (what's *that* called again?).  That's marginally more
complicated to do than a regular sleeve, but sure does look cute.  The
armhole edge might be finished with a facing, or possibly a bias strip.
 Just wanted to call your attention to that.

It's super pretty.  

Pora


Re: How difficult does this pattern look?

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Actually, I think that it's the *bodice* that's cut on an angle, so
that the neckline edge is on-grain.  I don't think that it's a bias
cut skirt.

This is a place where pulling the pattern instruction sheet out of the
envelope before you buy it would be useful.  Then you'd know how the
armhole edges are finished, and how the bodice is cut.


jenn

--
Jenn Ridley : snipped-for-privacy@chartermi.net

Re: How difficult does this pattern look?
I've done a bias cut skirt before, so that shouldn't be a problem. I am
a little worried about the sleeves... If it's a "half" cap, will that
pose more of a problem? If it's more complicated than I can handle, I
might just do the version of the dress without the sleeves... but
you're they, they're super cute!


Re: How difficult does this pattern look?
On 23 Apr 2006 16:15:20 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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Hi!  It looks like the construction would not be difficult but that's
pretty form fitting, so I suggest making a mock-up in some inexpensive
muslin or an old sheet first to see how it fits and where you might have
to make adjustments. =20

-Irene


--------------
You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.=20
--Mae West=20
--------------

Re: How difficult does this pattern look?
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:
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Hi,

I made up a New Look pattern last year for a wedding. It went together
well - all the pieces were the right size and fitted each other. I found
the instructions OK to follow -there was only one place I didn't do what
they said to do.

As to how easy your pattern is - I don't know - check the back of the
packet and/or instructions to see if that bodice is lined - and how, and
what other interesting constuction quirks there are.

A test dress in cheap fabric could be the way to go!

Sarah

Re: How difficult does this pattern look?

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Views A, D & E are the ones with the surplice bodice.  I'd not suggest those
unless you were more sure of your skills.  B or C would go together pretty
easily I think.  I have never had a problem with New Look patterns.  They
have always fit me well and the whole pattern has worked well.


Sharon


--
Never try to teach a pig to sing.  It's a waste of time and just annoys the
pig.



Re: How difficult does this pattern look?
I'm actually thinking of doing view E-- why would that bodice be more
difficult? Also, the bodice is lined-- will that pose a problem?


Re: How difficult does this pattern look?

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Because you have 2 front pieces to deal with.  Not only do you have to line
up the bust darts (or in this case gathers) properly but you have to get the
pieces lapped correctly.  It's tricky.  And you wind up with 8 layers of
fabric at the "waistline" in front, some of that gathered.  You will have to
be sure to remove as much bulk from the seam allowances as possible.

It's not a terribly difficult dress to make.  But since you asked would this
be an easy pattern, the answer is B or C would be the easiest.  View A would
be something of a challenge because you would have the surplice bodice to
deal with as well as the Mandarin collar.  View D would be a pain with the
bias binding around the neckline.  View E also has the half cap sleeves.
The sleeve piece will not go all the way around the armhole opening.  You
will need to be VERY careful about making sure you mark all the alignment
points on that.  Also, that kind of cap sleeve can be unflattering if you
don't have Jada Pinkett-Smith arms.  It hugs closer to the upper arm than a
normal t-shirt sleeve.  It also really points directly to any tricep flab
you may have.  The flutter sleeve on C is a lot more attractive (much
softer!)  Also, easier to do.  Again, you would need to be extremely careful
about marking alignment points as the sleeve doesn't go all the way around.
And the only other challenge to a flutter sleeve like that is the very
narrow hem it will need.  But it looks a whole lot better on the body.

As far as the lined bodice.... It's not a problem.  It will raise the
difficulty level some.  I would suggest self lining it, in other words, line
it with the same fabric from which you are making the dress.  I would also
suggest, regardless of what the pattern says, that you understitch the
lining.  That will make it turn in so much nicer.  That's what I did on my
DD's spring formal (which had a very similar style bodice.)  You may be able
to understitch the whole neckline on the machine with this one.  If the
bodice were unlined, it would not look nearly as nice.

Sharon


--
Never try to teach a pig to sing.  It's a waste of time and just annoys the
pig.



Re: How difficult does this pattern look?

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line
the
to


Ok. so the math brain is slow today...  That should be 4 layers of bodice
plus the skirt layer at the front waistline.  Still need to reduce as much
of the bulk as you can.  lol

Sharon


--
Never try to teach a pig to sing.  It's a waste of time and just annoys the
pig.



Re: How difficult does this pattern look?


Sharon Hays wrote:
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Sharon, if it's fully lined you were correct:  eight layers of bodice
and lining (for the surplice front, counting the fashion fabric [2] +
lining [2] X  2 [seam allowance]  PLUS at least one layer of skirt
(assuming it's unlined).  And the neckline edge seam increases it
another 2 layers at that point.

Even if not fully lined, the facing at the neck edge would give the
same number of layers of fabric....

HTH ;-)

Beverly



Re: How difficult does this pattern look?
sorry for the multiple questions... you're all so helpful! :)

What's understitching? and why would it be important to do on this
garment?

It doesn't seem as easy I thought it would be, but I'm always up for a
challenge. I picked up some crepe backed satin, so I hope that was a
good choice.


Re: How difficult does this pattern look?
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:
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If you look on my site, you'll see a full explanation plus pictures.
Look in The Learning Zone.  :)  URL below.

Safe site - I'm not selling anything!

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: How difficult does this pattern look?
thank you!


Re: How difficult does this pattern look?
Kate Dicey wrote:
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Don't apologize for asking questions.  It's the smart thing to do when
you don't know!

And if you haven't done understitching before, it would be a very good
idea to practice doing it on the trial garment that several posters have
encouraged you to make.  A 'muslin', as it is often called, will let you
know how the pattern fits you, and any adjustments that might need to be
made, before you cut into your more expensive fabric; and learning the
valuable technique of understitching will definitely be easier on cotton
fabric than on crepe backed satin.

Best of luck with your dress.  The pattern you've chosen is very attractive.

Doreen in Alabama

Re: How difficult does this pattern look?
I'm going to look at the pattern instructions right now.  Get back to
you on the specifics.

Pora


Re: How difficult does this pattern look?
Okay, I've looked at the instructions.  It turns out that the skirt is
bias cut and the bodice is straight grain.  It's been a long time since
I did a surplice (that's the word!) bodice and Sharon's points about
aligning the front are good.

My biggest concern is that the pattern gives little provision for
dealing with the skirt.  It says the total skirt wearing ease is 6
1/2", which must be some attempt at compensating.  The last time I did
a bias skirt the pattern gave 4" seam allowances everywhere and I was
glad.  This dress also has a center back zipper, which  will go from
straight grain to bias.  Does anyone else think this is challenging for
a beginner-intermediate sewist?  Definitely a good learning experience,
but one should be warned to have a lot of patience.  The pattern also
doesn't mention the importance of pinning the skirt and letting it hang
overnight and then readjusting the pins the next day.  It's good to
wear the dress and have a friend redo the pins.

It might help to tell us your skills and what you've made before.

As an aside regarding sleeve styles, my own body kind of does the
opposite of Sharon's description.  Because of a heavy bust and sloping
shoulders, flutter sleeves add volume and make me look heavy and
slouchy.  Cap sleeves bring the lines higher  like a gentle shoulder
pad and keep things looking trim.  Flutter sleeves can enhance lean
figures by adding volume and movement.

Pora


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