How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...

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Yesterday I was in the middle of an alteration when I
discovered my iron was cold.  Since it does NOT have an
auto-shut-off, I realized I was finally going to have to do
something about the plug, which had been showing progressive
signs of age:  Hot to the touch when I unplugged it,
discolored cord near the plug, and finally it spit sparks at
me.  Oh, dear!  So I have added a new bit to my Hints and
Tips section.  And I finally learned how to create
thumbnails linked to full-sized pictures:
http://ickes.us/ReplacePlugonIron.aspx

--
Beverly
http://ickes.us/default.aspx




Re: How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...




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Nice Job Beverly, that said I would have tinned the wire ends with solder.
Also looks to me like the wire is way to light duty for an iron. Most use a
much heavier cord and insulation .

--
Ron Anderson A1 Sewing Machine
18 Dingman Rd Sand Lake, NY 12153
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Re: How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...


Ron Anderson wrote:
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Thank you.  :-)

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My dictionary defines "tinned" as "plated with tin", so I
will take a wild guess here and interpret that as what my DH
called "solder'.  I have his (electric) soldering iron and
several spools of soldering wire, so I may take the plug
apart and tackle it.  A couple of questions:

    1. Why?  I am not being snarky, I really want to know
why soldering the wire is necessary.  What does it improve?

     2. When?  That is, when do I apply the solder.  Does it
go on the straight bare twisted wire; or on the wire after I
curve it to go around the screw; or on the connection after
I screw it down tight?

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I think so too, although it has served well for many years.
I think it finally failed after being flexed one too many
times where if dropped down from the wall outlet.  I asked
my son-in-law a couple of months ago if he would re-wire my
iron (I LOVE this particular iron so I'm willing to spend
some $$$ getting it fixed) and he is willing.  While I was
at Big Box Store getting the plug I looked at some nearby
wire with molded plugs, but then I didn't know which gauge
to buy: #12, #14, #16, #18, ??? and the clerk was not able
to advise, as I had not brought a piece of the old wire with
me.  I'll ask DSIL for his input. Some of the wires were
quite stiff, and I think they might not work well.

The other restraint is that I have yet to open up the base
of the iron, so I don't know if the manufacturer used some
sort of proprietary connectors, making replacement a
non-starter.

Thanks very much for your input, Ron.  You are a gem "here".

--
Beverly
http://ickes.us/default.aspx



Re: How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...




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YW


Yes on the straight twisted wire, then bend to your needs. It improves the
connection. Just one of those things probably not all that necessary but is
the correct way. I can be anal like that.

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    Probably 12 or 14 but look for heater wire. Has the insulation
properties for hot appliances you may not find that at the depot.

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  Nothing ventured noting gained or lost ;))

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   YW

--
Ron Anderson A1 Sewing Machine
18 Dingman Rd Sand Lake, NY 12153
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Re: How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...


Ron Anderson wrote:
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<snip>>
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Ok, thanks for the additional information. If I decide not
to replace the cord (or can't find a suitable cord), I'll
take the plug apart and solder the end of the wire.

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Ok, I'll be on the hunt for 12 or 14 gauge "heater" wire, I
don't think either the depot or it's big box competitor has
it.  There is a local large electrical supply house
http://www.platt.com/default.aspx I'll check on Monday.

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Usually true, but in this particular case I now have a
working iron following my repair, so something *might* be
lost.  :-}  I don't think Rowenta makes a non-auto-shut-off
iron anymore.

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:-D

--
Beverly
http://ickes.us/default.aspx



Re: How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...


BEI Design wrote:

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Answering my own error:

http://www.allbrands.com/products/abp22667-0358.html

Hmmm, perhaps I'll just sink my $$$ into a new iron, I
suspect other parts of the current 20+ year old one are
wearing out as well.

When I was helping DGD with her dress a few weeks ago over
at her house, I gritted my teeth every time we moved to the
ironing board to press something and the stupid thing had
shut-off.  I would not own an iron that does that.  But I
have trained myself to say,  "The Iron Is Unplugged!" out
loud every time I leave my sewing room and/or quit for the
day (and to look to be sure it is), so the auto-shut-off
'feature' is not necessary.

--
Beverly
http://ickes.us/default.aspx



Re: How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...




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Beverly,
If you drop me a note I have some iron info you might like to see.

--
Ron Anderson A1 Sewing Machine
18 Dingman Rd Sand Lake, NY 12153
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Re: How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...




On Monday, July 19, 2010 7:43 AM [GMT+1=CET],

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Ron, I would welcome information about irons.  My basic
requirement is that it NOT have a coated soleplate, NOT have
any sort of automatic shut-off feature, and provide lots of
steam.  I like the Rowenta I have because it has "shot-of
steam" and spray buttons, uses regular tap water, and has
NEVER spurted or dripped.  I know that's a lot to ask of an
iron, I paid over $100 for this one about 20 years ago, and
it has served me very well.  I would like to find a back-up
iron with similar features.

I own a Singer steam press, and a Jiffy Steamer.  I have not
investigated steam generators.

Please do share your info.  Thanks!

Beverly



Re: How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...


On Sun, 18 Jul 2010 11:08:07 -0700, "BEI Design"

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"Tin" is a technical term meaning to coat with a thin layer of solder
-- presumably because it makes the "tinned" item look like tin plate.
It's been so long since I used a soldering iron that I've forgotten
the applications of tinning -- but one reason was to make sure that
solder applied later would stick.  Ah, another application:  tinning
the tip of the soldering iron kept it from oxidizing, and helped to
conduct heat from the iron to the wire.  

Another datum was pounded in hard enough to stick:  for electrical
work, it is always rosin-core solder, never acid flux.  

I've never even *seen* acid flux, but I was thoroughly warned against
it anyway.  

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
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Re: How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...


On Sun, 18 Jul 2010 11:08:07 -0700, BEI Design
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Wire sizes get thicker as the numbers go down.  Thick wire is an advantage for
cords on appliances that are pulling lots of juice... the thinner the wire,
the more the wire will heat up (by acting like a resistor) and the less
juice gets to the iron, so it won't heat as well.  There are tables of
what size wire to use for what length of run and how much draw on the other
end -- the longer the wire, the bigger the wire diameter needs to be to
mitigate the resistance of the wire.  

(This is also why it's a Bad Idea to plug something like an iron into a
$2 extension cord meant for maybe a 100 W lamp -- your iron doesn't work well
and the cord gets too hot. My general rule is to choose
an extension cord fatter than the cord needing extending if I can't find
the wire gauge of the original.If I know the original wire gauge, I go up
in size for the extension cord -- so something that had #16 wire, I'd use a
#14 or #12 extension cord on.)

Wire comes in two basic formats, solid and stranded.  If you dig down to the
wire itself, it will either be a "pencil" of copper, or it will be lots of
fine strands twisted together.  The fine strand form is the flexible one; the
solid strand is what you'd use to rewire your house.

I'm with Ron on tinning the ends of stranded wire.  Also keeps all those
little copper whiskers lined up instead of escaping from under the connector
screws.

One of the safety checks I do on irons every month or so is wait till I've
been using it for awhile and then feel along the wire and the head of the
plug -- I'm looking for hot spots from resistance.  When wire is repeatedly
flexed, eventually the little copper strands can break, increasing resistance.
Or the insulation starts going from too much flexing and aging.  Either way,
it's time for a fixit session.

Re: How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...


Kay Lancaster wrote:
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I knew that.  I was just not able to make a decision, since
I didn't have a piece of the original cord with me, and I
wanted to get something slightly larger but not so stiff
that it would be difficult to manage.

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Thanks, Kay, I surmised that was the case.  I don't want to
replace the wire with something insufficient for the
purpose, but also want whatever I choose to be quite
flexible so it doesn't arm-wrestle me to the ground while I
press.  Probably one of those, "You can't get there from
here" scenarios...  ;-}  It does not have to be any longer
then the current cord, which is about 6-7 feet.


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Yup, my DH always cautioned me about that. Fortuantly I
never have to use an extention cord with my iron, there is a
perfectly placed outlet in the wall 4' above the floor right
where I have my ironing board set up.

I have several very heavy duty orange extension cords in the
garage, I use them for when I vacuum the car.  Probably way
over-kill, but...

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Ok, I'm convinced, I'll be taking the plug apart and
soldering the wire.  Even if I find a new iron, I'll keep
this one as a back-up and I want it to be safe.

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Indeed.  That's what happened to my iron.  I had noticed
that the plug was feeling hot the last few times I unplugged
it (and I NEVER pull the cord, always the plug itself), and
Friday was apparently one-use-too-many, the wire broke and
shorted out.

Thanks for all your information, I appreciate it.

--
Beverly
http://ickes.us/default.aspx



Re: How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...



"BEI Design" wrote...
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Wow, you're really brave. I tend to try to repair everything repairable but
when it comes to electricity, I back off a little and hand it over to
somebody else. Somewhat scared from early age on. But it's good if one
doesn't have to depend on others to do these things. Mind you, I do let DH
do the drilling of holes in walls, not because I can't do it but because I
hate the noise and the violence of the act. ;-)

U.



Re: How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...


Ursula Schrader wrote:
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My DH was a trained electrician, and I watched what he did
over several years.  A little of it rubbed off.  He also was
perfectly capable of most plumbing jobs, a whiz-bang car
mechanic, and did most of the laundry and all the grocery
shopping!  I miss him every day..

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Agreed!  I try very hard to fix what needs fixing.  I can
call on my sons-in-law for help, but keep it to a bare
minimum.  They are terrific, but there is a limit.  ;-}

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One of my most treasured BD gifts was the variable-speed
cordless drill my kids gave me a couple of years ago.  I
have used it for drilling, and it is also a reversible screw
driver.  Invaluable!

--
Beverly
http://ickes.us/default.aspx



Re: How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...


On Mon, 19 Jul 2010 12:39:43 -0700, "BEI Design"

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And you can use it to wind bobbins and spools.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
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Re: How I replaced the plug on my trusty Rowenta...




Joy Beeson wrote:
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LOL!  I suppose I could if ever my bobbin winder failed.

--
Beverly
http://ickes.us/default.aspx



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