kids sewing

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my daughter is 9 and loves to sew..first i got her one of those toy
macines and she was very unhappy baecuse the seams fall out as there
is no bobbin..now she uses a old kenmore and has a blast !! she
prefers to create her "own" patterns and designs to using preprinted
ones..i think i see a Vera Wang in the making hehe..
i make alot of our clothes and i think my family likes it at least
they wear what i make so thats a good sign.


Re: kids sewing
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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You discovered the secret of modern so-called toy sewing machines!
Congrats to you and your daughter!

Re: kids sewing
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The toy one I had in the mid 70's was no better. I just sewed by hand till
I inherited my grandmother's Singer.

-Liz



Re: kids sewing
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
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I teach kids her age to sew on real sewing machines (I have a whole
flock of them!).  It's so much fun to see what they will create next!  :D

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: kids sewing
"Toy" machines tend to just annoy and frustrate interested children
who are trying to learn to sew..They usually only sew a chain stitch,
and they generally do that poorly..

 I started on an (old) white portable ss machine when I was 6 years
old. I learned how to fill and load the bobbin and thread the
machine..  I see nothing wrong with this approach at all. (I also
started to learn to cook at 6 using my mother's kitchen).  Today's
safety mavens have absolute hissy-fits about these concepts, but I
never stitched through my fingers, nor seriously harmed myself in the
kitchen. (I don't count a very minor scorch of the fingertips when
learning how to remove a baking sheet from the oven.)

If we follow through competely with all the dire warnings about what
we are supposed to "protect" children from nowdays, the children in
question will never learn anything useful.

Just my 02 cents.
me

On Thu, 31 May 2007 08:42:59 +0100, Kate XXXXXX

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Re: kids sewing
I totally agree with "me".  I remember my first experience when I was 5-6,
with baking.  I burned my hand taking a pan of biscuits from the oven of my
DGM's wood stove.  But the next morning, I was in the kitchen to help bake
biscuits again.  The hand healed w/no damage.
My DGS, who graduated from high school last week, was helping with the
candied yams on Christmas after he turned 4 in mid-October.  He burned his
fingers, removing them from the oven and looked at his Mom with big tears in
his eyes and announced, "I'll be a cold cooker, I not like hot cooking."
Thank goodness, he long ago changed his mind.
My children followed my example of teaching their children to cook, sew,
whatever, when they were young.  If you refuse to allow them to experiment,
they will never learn.
Emily



Re: kids sewing
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in news:1180578576.091832.7660
@n15g2000prd.googlegroups.com:

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I see really nice sewing machines at yard sales all the time, ranging in
price from $25 to $40. I almost picked up one with a cabinet last weekend,
but where the heck am I going to put it? It was pretty much the same one my
mom used to use and they wanted $40 for it. Sigh.

I highly recommend going with a "real" machine when anyone asks.

--
~Donna
http://www.frugalsewing.com

Re: kids sewing
Use it as an extra table in your dining or living room?  IMHO, there is
always a need for an extra table somewhere in the house.
Emily



Re: kids sewing
Donna wrote:
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Night stands, entry tables, end tables, buffet surfaces, even plant
stands but please please please use leakproof trays to prevent "doilies"
on the surface.  I have even heard that four machine cabinets pushed
together makes a dining room table.

Sewing machine collectors - those who tend toward treadles, especially
nice ones like parlor cabinets - are very creative about housing their
machines.  Some even have one in the bathroom.

The design of the cabinets was clearly to make them dual-purpose --
there's a Singer cabinet that doubles as a desk, complete with ink well
in the top drawer. Library tables, occasional tables, consoles, and it's
always nice when the cabinet is a particularly fine piece of furniture.
*looking at my gorgeous birds-eye maple cabinet and my oak drawing room
cabinet*
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: kids sewing
How neat that this topic surfaced this week.  My 5 3/4-year-old
granddaughter is staying with us this week.  She loves to do crafty things
so I bought a pattern to make her a halter top and shorts set and we'll be
making it "together."   I'm going to be taking pictures along the way for
her scrap book and hopefully we'll end up with something we can both be
proud of!

Liz H.


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Re: kids sewing
WooHoo!!  ANd my 7yo son wants to start learning how to se, starting
with some shorts for himself.  SO tonight, I bought some inexpensive
cotton in a wild blue print, and later this week, he and I will be
working on them.  He wanted me to cut them out for him, but I told him
that if he wants to learn, he needs to learn ALL the steps...he didn't
complain too much :-)

Larisa

Liz wrote:
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Re: kids sewing
Larisa, hopefully your DS will be more interested than was my DGD.  She
helped me cut out the pieces we needed, but it was downhill all the way from
there.  I always use our  pool table to lay out the pattern pieces and do
the pinning.  I sat her on the pool table with my tomato pin cushion and
gave her the job of passing me pins as needed.  I even got her to pass them
to me head first so I didn't stick myself.  Within just a few minutes she
had somehow managed to split the strawberry thingy and dump the sand onto
the material.  I assured her that it was not a big deal as I had a backup
pin cushion, but by the time I had fetched it she was already off the table
and into another room, painting a picture.  However, when she saw me take
the cover off my sewing machine she pulled up her chair and got interested
once more.  I let her "steer" a few pieces of scrap material through the
needle while I worked the pedal, and she did very well in that she was able
to sew in an almost perfectly straight line.  But then shestarted getting
goofy, squirming around on my lap and knocking over a box of notions.  After
very few minutes I could tell that my patience was not going to last much
longer so I called it a day.  We'll see how tomorrow goes.  <G>

Liz H.
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Re: kids sewing
Liz wrote:
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Take it from a teacher:  baby steps at that age!  Their concentration
span is about 15 miniutes, after which a change of activity is in order.
  This is why most primary school lessons of an hour in one subject
(like maths) contain several different short activities.  As they get
older, the attention span stretches out.


Give her something to do to help you for a few minutes, then give her
something else:  she could pin the pockets and then go find the thread,
then come back and help pin the skirt, then find a trim or zip, and so
on.  I build a lot of different stages and things to do into the lessons
when I'm teaching sewing (or anything else), especially with the younger
ones.

When it comes to the sewing, let her sew up a small bag out of the
scraps and help you with long seams: break it down into different
activities all the way along.  It takes longer to make the garment that
way, but you get there in the end!  I remember my mum doing this with me
when I made that first skirt, aged seven.  Mind you, we didn't have a
pattern, so I missed that stage out on the first garment we did!  :D  It
was a dirndle style skirt, in loose weave cotton, so we just drew
threads to make it even and cut along the gaps!

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: kids sewing
offkilterquilter wrote:
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Yay!  Good for you - both!  :D

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

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