Lycra...skipped stitches

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I'm sewing lightweight lycra and getting skipped stitches in my
seamlines.  I've tried every needle type from woven to ball point,
needles for stretch fabrics, tried my teflon foot, my even feed
foot...all terrible.  About the best so far is something called a "Q"
foot from Sears...only 2 skips in about 8 inches of stitching.  I've
been sewing a lot of lycra but have always had to go to my serger to
get the job done.  However, using the serger, I can't leave a seam
allowance.  Any ideas on how I can get my regular machine to stitch
without all the skipping?
  Cheryl

Re: Lycra...skipped stitches


Cheryl wrote:
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Anything with Lycra in really need a 'super stretch' needle.  Use a
short stitch with a narrow zigzag for flat seams.

A walking foot and the super-stretch needle will HELP, but is not a
guarantee of perfection!

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: Lycra...skipped stitches


Cheryl,
I was looking for a Schmetz needle listing because I'm going to be ordering
some from a co-op shortly.  And I found this:
http://www.schmetzneedles.com/Schmetz_Sales_Guide.pdf

Hope this helps,
AK in PA


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Re: Lycra...skipped stitches


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Thank you for the chart reference.  I have been using Schmetz
needles.  The chart mentions thread size...how do I determine what the
thread size is?  I do have a needle and thread selection guide, but
don't know how to use it.  It has a wheel that you dial - point to the
thread weight and the needle size and point is give.  Only I don't
know how to determine the thread weight.  The wheel shows weights of
100, 60, 50, 40, 30, and 20.  The thread spools I have give length and
a measurement in "m", i.e., 365 m for one spool and 100 m on another
spool.  Are these weights? or thickness?  How do they relate to the
weights given on my guide?

Cheryl

Re: Lycra...skipped stitches


wrote:
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I have used a stretch needle.  What is a "super" stretch needle?  I
have tried my even feed foot, which I think is like a walking foot.  I
will look for a super stretch needle next week when I go to the fabric
store.
  Cheryl

Re: Lycra...skipped stitches


Cheryl wrote:
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It's a needle for stuff like swimsuit fabric and elastic.

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: Lycra...skipped stitches

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point,
a "Q"
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I've
serger to
seam
stitch

Hello,

What **size** needle are you using ?
What type of thread are  you using ?
What is the machine ?

First try lubricating your needle with just a **wee** bit of oil
?

like rub a wee drop between finger tips then lighly rub the
needle with the oily finger tips  untill it is slippery then
ready set go

If yoy do not have light sewing machine oil then i suppose some
vegetable or olive oil will work ?
if you have some siliconized lubricant then that will work the
best as it stas on the needle longer IMO

Let me know how it worked out
robb


Re: Lycra...skipped stitches
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I used a size 11 needle.  Tried ball point and woven styles.
Using Coats Dual Duty thread.
Machine is a Kenmore.
I will try the oil on a scrap of fabric and see how it goes...don't
want to leave oil stains on the real garment.
  Cheryl

Re: Lycra...skipped stitches

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Oooops ... Sorry Cheryl i misread your OP

i thought it was 2 skips every 8 stitches
now i see you typed every 8" inches of stitching

i do not think the lubed  needle will help you

the lubricated needle was to help identify if the problem was the
lycra grabbing the needle or a fabric bounce problem  but at 2
skips per 8" then the lubricated needle would likely have no
affect and give no useful results.

2 skips per 8 inches is a more sinister problem.

well,  if the others highly experienced suggestions do not pan
out i would reccomend trying tests with ;
1. a different better thread. I use coats but many serious sewers
seem to use other thread.
    i have had thread twist problems before when the thread was
coming off the
   "wrong end" og the spool
2. a different size needle smaller / larger


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goes...don't



Re: Lycra...skipped stitches
Cheryl wrote:
  > I used a size 11 needle.  Tried ball point and woven styles.
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Cheryl,

You said a light weight lycra I think? In which case try a smaller
needle - try a size 10 and see if that helps.

I'd also find yourself a better, lighter weight thread. I tend to use
gutterman in my machine, but some people on this group report bad things
about it recently - I haven't sewn in a while, so can't comment.

The 365m and 1000m you have on your reels of thread is the length in
metric meters - not the weight of the thread. The weight of the thread
gives you a feel for whether it is thick or thin. Now somewhere there
are charts etc. that give you all of the numbering systems and
cross-comparisons - but I'm not sure where! But it has been mentioned in
this group in the past - so a search on old articles may help.

I'd suggest you try some serger cone thread for your lycra - it tends to
be lighter weight than standard machine thread.

HTH

Sarah

Re: Lycra...skipped stitches
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Ballpoint needle and stabilizer under and possibly over the seam line.
Paper will do, but washaway stabilizer works better.  I'm assuming you're
dealing with a nylon or poly lycra knit, as cotton lycra knits typically
handle better than that.  If you're dealing with a lycra blend woven,
the needle should be a universal or sharp.


Re: Lycra...skipped stitches
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My guess is you are experiencing flagging. That is then the needle pushes
the fabric a bit down in the needle hole and then closes the loop so the
hook can not pick up the thread.
Try uses the left or right needle positions or the straight stitch plate is
you have one. A good quality, and I see from your posts you are using
Schmetz, needle in ball point or stretch even better needle.
Many old machines balk at that kind of work.


--

Ron Anderson A1 Sewing Machine
18 Dingman Rd., Sand Lake, NY 12153
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Re: Lycra...skipped stitches
Cheryl.
I googled sewing thread sizing and got a bunch of sites.
http://www.gunzetal.com/ETechnical1.htm

Now, if the spools of thread would just tell us which system they are using
then we could be sure.
AK in PA

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Re: Lycra...skipped stitches
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Ron:
  The trouble is there is no notation on the spools of thread that
could indicate the weight.  Only the length.  I'm at a loss here.
  Cheryl

Re: Lycra...skipped stitches
Thread sizing is a real morass.  The stuff commonly available to us who sew
at home is roughly equivalent to 40 wt cotton -- that's the usual "dressmaker
thread".  "Lingerie thread" or "Extra fine thread" is usually about equivalent
to 60 wt cotton.  Embroidery threads can range from very fine (70 wt is a
bobbin thread for embroidery) to quite heavy, about 20 wt, in my experience.

More here:
http://www.fashion-incubator.com/mt/archives/thread_sizes.html

Kay


Re: Lycra...skipped stitches
Kay Lancaster wrote:
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Embroidery threads are marked as to thickness.  Most home embroidery
machines call for 40 wt., or the designs for them do.  I have a
P.O.E.M./Singer EU that calls for 60 wt, though I have used 40,
especially for designs made for 40.  I have a nice cotton thread for
making lace on it that is 50 wt.

The machines will stitch fine with any of those weights, it's the
density of the digitized designs that determines which you need to use.
  Most call for 40 wt because it gives better coverage.  Outline designs
like redwork and blackwork do well with 30 wt.
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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