Mending clothes by hand

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How hard is it to learn how to sew by hand? I want to mend some of my
work clothes without bying a sewing machine.

Re: Mending clothes by hand
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Not hard.  If it's a broken seam, you'll want to know how to do backstitch,
which is just called "stitching" in this 1893 hand sewing textbook:
http://vintagesewing.info/19th/1892-sn/sn-02.html#stitching

Joy and Olwyn Mary are probably among the most experienced here with hand
patching fabrics -- I mostly just applique a patch into place by hand
or mend on a sewing machine.
http://video.about.com/teenfashion/How-To-Patch-a-Hole-in-Jeans.htm
Applique methods I'm most likely to use:
Needleturn and reverse:
http://www.nmia.com/~mgdesign/qor/begin/applique.htm -- of course, you don't
need to applique fancy shapes... squares and rectangles work just fine.

Kay







Re: Mending clothes by hand
On 21 Apr 2008 02:42:03 GMT, Kay Lancaster wrote:

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I'll second that, but it does help to get decent needles matched to what
you're trying to do/sew.

I have several needles that are a few decades(!) old, They are fairly thin
and I find them very easy to use. The needle length also affects whatever
you're trying to do. I use a slightly longer needle for back stitching, a
shorter needle if I'm overstitching along an edge.

I've been looking around recently trying to find some modern replacements,
the cheap readily available needles are all quite noticeably thicker than
my old needles. May be OK if you're stitching fairly thick materials but
not so good if the material is quite fine or delicate.

Don't be tempted to pull off loooong lengths of thread, it'll knot and
tangle and you'll very quickly lose patience!  


--
Richard - The older I get, the better I used to be!

the dot wanderer at tesco dot net


Re: Mending clothes by hand

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Agreed.

That's the best piece of advice, most beginners (and some more experienced!)
think that it will same time if they use a long length of thread. My rule
when teaching is never more than 18".

I only sew by hand and thoroughly enjoy it, machine sewing is boring as well
as noisy!

Cue for members to claim they have silent machines :-)

Mary
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Re: Mending clothes by hand
Mary Fisher wrote:
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My treadle machines make a very soothing clickety-clack.
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: Mending clothes by hand

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The one I used to use did too and it wasn't unpleasant - but it interfered
with my radio listening (plays and other voice-based programmes).

Hand sewing, apart from being very satisfying, is an excuse to sit and relax
while enjoying the radio.

I do a lot of knitting too and have a machine. Guess how I knit!

:-)

Mary
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Re: Mending clothes by hand
Mary Fisher wrote:
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*sigh*  You're a luddite?  OK, you sew by hand, and knit by hand....do
you own a food processor but never use it?
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: Mending clothes by hand
On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 09:26:46 -0700, Pogonip wrote:

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Now that made Oi chuckle.......[1]

[1] For our cousins across the pond, 'Oi' is a broad English dialect
rendering of 'I'. Was used in a comedy series on UK TV


--
Richard - The older I get, the better I used to be!

the dot wanderer at tesco dot net


Re: Mending clothes by hand
The Wanderer wrote:
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Hehehe...  I own and use lots of sewing machines, but sew some things by
hand because they stil come out better and/or I enjoy the process/it
needs to be done in a historically accurate way where it'll be seen.  I
also own and use a big fancy food processor and a stick blender, but we
also have a Mouli food mill in the house (belongs to James), a potato
ricer, and a large selection of old fashioned knives.  Some things are
easier done by machine (first stages of kneeding bread, making pastry,
blending soups and sauces, for example), but some are more satisfying
done by hand (cutting tomatoes into lilies for a buffet, cutting potato
wedges... ), and some are impossible by machine (cutting all the ikky
fatty bits out of meat before making stews and casseroles).


Horses for courses, innit!  ;)
--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: Mending clothes by hand

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Hurrah!

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You've hit the nail on the head.

I really must brinig Spouse's overlocker down the road ...

Mary
er - what's a stick blender???



Re: Mending clothes by hand
Mary Fisher wrote:
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I think she meant stick blender.  I've got one of those, and it's nifty.
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: Mending clothes by hand

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Isn't that what I asked?

I've looked and looked but a stick blender ... ???

:-)

Mary



Re: Mending clothes by hand
Mary Fisher wrote:
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http://www.the-sage.com/recipes/recipes.php3?.State=Display&id=5
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: Mending clothes by hand

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Ah, thank you! A daughter in law, a superb cook, has one but she never uses
it. She suggested that I might like to use it to make mayonnaise and I did
try it but I'd have preferred a fork - just as quick, easier to wash and
electricity-free :-)

At home I use a horlicks blender (manual), it's fool-proof!

Mary



Re: Mending clothes by hand
Re: Mending clothes by hand

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It seems awfully expensive ...

Mary
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Re: Mending clothes by hand
On Tue, 22 Apr 2008 10:33:58 +0100, "Mary Fisher"

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Assuming that Oster hasn't gone Singer on us, expensive is the way to
go -- we finally found a place to buy carpet sweepers, bought the
cheaper model, and it's almost useless:  falls apart every time I pick
it up by the handle, and just barely sweeps.  

Joy Beeson
--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/ -- sewing
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Re: Mending clothes by hand

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We got rid of the carpets except for the stairs - Things live in carpets and
spread to stashes (or is it the other way round?) - and I just sweep the
hard floors with a broom. Everyone* said it would be cold and noisy, it's
neither.

Mary
* i.e. Spouse, who had to do the taking up and sealing floorboards :-)



Re: Mending clothes by hand

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Oh. I've been considering getting one of those.  I'll
think again.

Re: Mending clothes by hand
Mary Fisher wrote:
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The chef's magic wand!  I have one of these: http://www.bamixuk.com/
The original and best!  :)  I first used ome when working in a hotel
kitchen back in the '70's.  Took another 15 years for them to hit the
domestic market, and now there are cheapo versions all over the place.
But I love this one and use it a lot (like today for preeing a whole pot
of HOT soup in the pot!).  I have several attachments for it, which are
also great at what they do.  Shoving a gallon of lentil soup through a
sieve with a wooden spoon stikes me as a complete waste of my time when
this blends the whole lot in 2 minutes, and leaves all the nice
vegetable fibres still in it to aid digestion.  If I wqanted it without
the fibres, I'd use the Mouli, which is fun but hand cranked, so takes
more time.

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

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