new towels smell-help please

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I know this is a little off topic, but I just got 4 new bath towels.I washed
them first with fabric softener. After finding out that they wouldn't dry
off your body, I rewashed them without softener. Now they have a smell
almost like diluted motor oil. My husband thinks it might be the dyes they
use for the towels. And hints on how to get the smell out other than
repeated washings. Thanks for any help.



Re: new towels smell-help please
Try washing using 1 cup of vinegar in the wash, with about half the amount
of detergent you usually use.  HTH
Barbara in SC and now FL



Re: new towels smell-help please

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Using fabric softener on towels makes them non-absorbent, FYI.

--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI, Shakespeare)

Re: new towels smell-help please
jakesgrandma wrote:

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I boil wash all my towels.

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: new towels smell-help please
Just how do you do this???

Helen
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Re: new towels smell-help please
CHI-MUM wrote:
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Chuck them in the washing machine and set it to the boil wash program.
I thought they all did this.  I've never had one that didn't.

It gives them a pre-wash, a main wash, a hefty rinse, and spins at 1200
rpm.  Bit slow for modern washers.  When we replace it, I'm looking for
1400 or better.  Most front loaders do this these days.
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--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: new towels smell-help please

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 no American washer does this. i did see an import front
loader at Home Depot with a boil wash. it's not one of the
higher end of that company (which i totally forget the name of
right now), but it's the first boil wash i've ever seen in the
US.
lee
---
If Tyranny and Oppression come to this land, it will be in the
guise of
fighting a foreign enemy. -James Madison, fourth US president
(1751-1836)

Re: new towels smell-help please
enigma wrote:

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How strange...  You'd never sell one here that *didn't* have a boil
wash!  Mine's hot and cold fill, too, so it fills quicker and uses gas
heated water for most programs, thus being cheaper to run on hotter
programs.

I don't use the really hot programs often, but being able to chuck
baby-grunged things, fabric for shrinking, and all white cottons &
linens like towels, table cloths, and calico yardage in and cook it is
great.  This rather basic washer runs at 'min' (whatever THAT is!), 30,
45, 60, 70, and 95 degrees C (which is the 'boil wash' temp).
--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: new towels smell-help please

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Ah Kate;  wasn't paying attention and so didn't realize you're from over
`ome!  I'll
have to ask my daughter if hers does that too.  I never really checked
when we
were there last in 2004.  But, you are right.  It's a great program to
have
on a washer.

Mine is much bigger than the usual ones I've seen at my SIL'S or
daughters.  It's the size
of a standard size US washing machine only it's front loading and dries
the clothes as well if
you want.  I still don't have a line up here so that's what I use till I
do.

Helen



Re: new towels smell-help please
CHI-MUM wrote:

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I have space for a washer and separate dryer, which is great.  Mum's
washer/dryer will only dry a half load.  :(  I do have a line, but
haven't used it since last autumn, when the builders moved in and turned
the garden into a building site cum quagmire!  It's up, but adrift in a
sea of mud!  I must throw the grass seed down...

The one I was looking at recently was an LG with a large porthole and a
15 lb load.  Half the price of the similar Bosch machine!

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: new towels smell-help please

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My daughter has her dryer in the shed, next to the roundabout air dryer.
I may have to resort to one of those although I do hate them.  LG is
pretty popular in Canada and can only be found at the higher price
appliance dealers, but you can still get deals over here.  I saved at
least $700 by purchasing last years model they were clearing out.  and the
smaller model like the English size was the same price.

Helen



Re: new towels smell-help please

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Well isn't this just a huge discovery!!!  Here in the increasingly
"primitive" colonies, the trend is to COLD wash everything.  Almost
every cloth thing you buy says not to wash it in hot water.  And all the
detergents brag about working just as well in cold water.  Yeah
sure...... when donkeys fly!  For those of us with dust mite allergy,
the cold water thing is utterly stupid of course.  I've never seen a
washer that heated its own water--- though my Maytag is at least 15
years old now.  Egad, I am really out of it!  Dishwashers do that
commonly however.  

And now, the washing machines they are trying to sell here are
front-loaders to replace the mainly top-loaders we've used in the past.  
They are calling them high capacity washers that use less water.  
Someone please explain that to me.... how you can wash more clothes in
less water and not have everything come out smelly.  I really want to
understand this.

Here in the States, instead of doing meaningful water conservation like
not so much airborne irrigation or less asphalt or less lawn-watering,
they always push it off on the American homemaker in the form of often
hairbrained mechanisms like some of these new washing machines or water
faucets with limited output.  Oh yeah... now there a good one that just
torques me.  So instead of filling your tea kettle in a few seconds, you
have to stand there at the sink and wait forever for the water to
dribble out or, an even better example, there's not enough water coming
out of the showerhead to rinse your hair properly.  People here are now
compensating for the latter problem by installing the antithesis of
conservation---multiple showerheads in their showers!!!   Sorry.....
this is just one of those subjects that just really grates on my
sensibilities.  They think we have naught to do with our time than stand
in front of faucets and wait for an "attenuated flow" faucet.  AGH!  
What noodlehead came up with that idea?  Prolly the same squinty-eyed
lobcocks who came up with the idea of stiletto heels.  Sorry... just had
to get this off my chest!  I feel so much better now.  (:>)

Thank the Light I have a husband that knows how to remedy those kinds of
problems.  

Phae

--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI, Shakespeare)

Re: new towels smell-help please

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read this:
<http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/appliances/washing-machines/reports/how-to-choose.htm

and here:
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washing_machine

and here:
http://www.toolbase.org/techinv/techDetails.aspx?technologyID=177

Basically, the clothes are agitated more efficiently.

Much of the 'extra' water used in a top-loading washing machine is
being used to lighten the load on the agitator and motor.  It's not
really necessary for complete cleaning of the fabric.

--
Jenn Ridley : snipped-for-privacy@chartermi.net

Re: new towels smell-help please
Jenn Ridley wrote:

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<http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/appliances/washing-machines/reports/how-to-choose.htm
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My friend's new house has one. She said the clothes keep coming out all
twisted.  She doesn't like it for that reason.

I used to use a front loader in the dorm though, and I never had a
problem with it.  What I like is that they're stackable.  I'm moving my
laundry room upstairs with my next remodel.

Re: new towels smell-help please
angrie.woman wrote:

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I've never had that problem with clothes, and I've had three - all
different makes!  They tumble the wash in opposite directions all
through.  It helps prevent tangles like this.  The only time I get a
problem is if I wash yardage, and not often then.  Not that I wash
fabric that hasn't been sewn unless I can't avoid it!  ;)
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You can get stacking kits for most makes here.  I've always had plenty
of floor space, so never bothered.

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: new towels smell-help please
Mine does this; it changes directions, and I've never had trouble with
the clothes twisting!

Karen Maslowski in Cincinnati
www.sewstorm.com


Kate Dicey wrote:

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Re: new towels smell-help please

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What I like about mine is I only need one.

Helen



Re: new towels smell-help please
CHI-MUM wrote:

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Yes, now that I have a manufacturer's name I shall be on the hunt.
Canada's not too far....  I only ever saw one  of those, and nobody else
had ever seen one - I was beginning to think I had misunderstood the way
my friend claimed hers worked.


Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments (was: new towels smell-help) please

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Thank you very much, Jenn.  That was most enlightening!  Since I haven't
had to buy a washer in so long, I haven't really looked or kept up.  
This will no doubt help when that inevitable time arrives.... though I
must that my Maytag has certainly performed well (and a lot better than
my previous Whirlpool).

I took the opportunity to look at some sale ads and was shocked to see
that the front loaders ($599. - $1299) cost a solid 100% more than the
traditional type ($279 - $599.  So my first thought was..... wait.....
they are making me pay more to do all that bending over?  I did see one
with a built in heater btw.  It was the most expensive.

And speaking of bending over, am I correct that they have raised them up
so you don't have to kill your back emptying the darn things?  Or is
that merely cosmetic deception?  (I'll have a look next time I'm at
Lowes)  The bending over to get heavy wet clothes is probably the first
thing I found so unattractive about them.  

I read over all the articles.  Let me first say that since the Consumer
Reports (hereinafter "CR") scandal, I have been less trusting of them
though I still read them... but I don't rely on them as heavily.  They
say that traditional washers are "very good" at both washing and
capacity.  You get that "very good" quality at half the price--- and
with much shorter cycle times and regular, less costly detergent.  Do
those of you with a front loader really use a special detergent?  What
about other laundry additives like bleaches, blueing, stain removers,
fabric softeners, etc?

So is the front loader washing quality so much better that it's worth
twice the price?  I get my clothes clean now with the exception of a few
white things I find it necessary to bleach or items with grease that I
have to pretreat with Lestoil.  On average, I bleach 1 small load about
every two weeks.

I suspect that the water-saving calculation ignored the suds-saver
feature on conventional washers.  

Is it really true that you cannot soak your laundry in the front loaders
and that the door seals don't last a long time?  Good grief, I can't
imagine not being able to soak laundry.  Whatever would you do with
bloodstained sheets for instance?

CR says that some of the new top loaders already meet the 2007 energy
conservation requirements so I'm not so convinced on the energy front.  
But having a larger capacity and getting clothes cleaner with less
energy & water is very appealing--- if that is significantly true, not
just a little bit true.  It certainly seems advantageous to have less
water remain in the clothes, energy-wise.  But what about delicates?  
And what about that mold and musty smell that CR says front loaders have
a tendency to get?  Have you experienced this too?  And can you use a
non-phosphate, less polluting detergent in the front loaders?  Or are
those too difficult to rinse?  

Enquiring minds want to know. :)

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--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI, Shakespeare)

Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments
Phaedrine wrote:
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Look again: that pedestal they sit on costs extra. :)


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What was the CR scandal? I missed that.

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