Organizing thread and other stuff

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Today's (15 Jan 2013) Superior Threads Newsletter included a tip on
using milkshake straws --soda straws are too thin-- to keep your
spools and bobbins together.
http://mariaelkins.com/index.php/2013/01/organizing-thread-and-bobbins/

I stopped embroidering in the late sixties or early seventies, so I
don't have a lot of thread colors, and of the threads stacked on
chopsticks between a user's manual and a one-volume set of
Shakespeare, only five have associated bobbins, so those little
plastic-clip thingies work fine.  Since the spools are stacked on
chopsticks, some of the bobbin holders aren't even shimmed with
snippets of fabric to keep them from falling out of the spools.

But I do organize the threads that go with current projects. Somewhere
I obtained little re-sealable bags less than three inches wide and
five inches deep.  Into each goes a wound White bobbin, a wound Necchi
bobbin, a threaded needle or a needle woven into a snippet of wool,
and two spools of thread.  Two spools partly because I sometimes set
up both machines at the same time, and partly because the thread comes
on rather small spools and I tend to run out at awkward moments.

A snack bag --an abbreviated sandwich bag-- is the perfect size and
shape to contain my collection of hem gauges, but I doubt that enough
people inherited a box of bias-tape cards to make hem gauges out of
for that to be a generally-useful suggestion.  But the bag does
contain other small, flat tools that I used to have to hunt around in
the drawer for.  

And just today I discovered plastic bags to organize my pockets:  It
being cold, I took a jersey with a leak in the back-right pocket off
the mending pile to wear over my regular jersey.  Concerned that my
keys would poke through the hole and tear it bigger, I put my key ring
into a Baggie.   All of a sudden, it's a *lot* easier to find my lip
salve!

Perhaps I should make a little key-ring case.  I had quite a lot of
black ripstop left after I made my new emergency-tool case.  

--  
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
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Re: Organizing thread and other stuff
On 16/01/2013 02:38, Joy Beeson wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Or mend the cardi?  ;)

My thread storage solution:  
http://www.diceyhome.free-online.co.uk/Thread-Organization/Thread%20Cozy2.JPG

--  
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: Organizing thread and other stuff

:But I do organize the threads that go with current projects. Somewhere
:I obtained little re-sealable bags less than three inches wide and
:five inches deep.  Into each goes a wound White bobbin, a wound Necchi
:bobbin, a threaded needle or a needle woven into a snippet of wool,
:and two spools of thread.  Two spools partly because I sometimes set
:up both machines at the same time, and partly because the thread comes
:on rather small spools and I tend to run out at awkward moments.

With the exception of buttonhole twist, I simply don't buy thread in
spools less than 1000m, and only rarely less than 5000.  Not worth the
bother of running out, and thread is cheap if you don't buy little
spools from a retail outlet.  Wound bobbins go on a rubber bobbin
saver ring, which has the thread stand assembled around it, so it
can't walk off, unless it learns to use a screwdriver.  When I mend or
do something quick, I can easily find a suitable bobbin, or know I
need to wind one.  A garment sized project gets a couple wound before
starting.  







--  
sig 79

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