OT: Anyone Knit? - Page 2

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Re: OT: Anyone Knit?
Kate Dicey wrote:
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It looks like Shima Seiki makes industrial machines.  Nice, but for
factories.  When I was in New Hampshire over 15 years ago, I had a tour
of a knitting factory, and the machines there were truly amazing.  One
person ran up to 10 machines.  Some were flatbed, others were round for
the knitting of jersey.
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth

Re: OT: Anyone Knit?
Doug&Michelle wrote:
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Well, when you want it, it's rec.crafts.textiles.yarn.  :)

Re: OT: Anyone Knit?
Michelle:  Couldn't get to the boards, as my server was down for a
couple of days.  Anyway, my advice is to go to your local public library
and look at ALL of the knitting books they have, old and new, and see
which ones "talk" to you.  Don't forget the children's dept., sometimes
kids how-to books are better for beginners as they tend to use simpler
language and clearer illustrations.  One "grown-up" book I often
recommend is "Knitting in Plain English" by Maggie Righetti.  Borrow all
the books that look likely to you, and bring them home to peruse at your
leisure.

About crochet.  Crochet is generally much faster than knitting, and uses
about one-third more yarn for a given area of fabric.  It is also much
more firm and crisp, and less drapable.  Thus I knit sweaters, afghans,
watch caps, scarves, mittens and ALL baby items, but I crochet lace
edgings for table and bed linens, doilies and soft trivets for
protecting my dining table, and occasionally something like a vest which
is meant to stand away from the body rather than hugging it.

Remember, the technique you use is not particularly important as long as
it works for you.  There are many different styles of knitting all over
the world.  What IS important is the finished piece.

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans.

Re: OT: Anyone Knit?
Doug&Michelle wrote:
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As long as you don't add a twist to the loop, it doesn't matter which
way it rode the needle.  I had to "air knit" to see what you meant, and
realized I use counterclockwise for yarn held in my right hand and
clockwise for yarn held in my left.  When I hand-knit fair-isle
patterns, I put the main color on my right hand, the accent color on the
left so that I don't have to drop the yarn, pick it up, drop, pick, etc.
    It makes no difference to the end result.  Are you left-handed, by
chance?

--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth

Re: OT: Anyone Knit?

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Left handed.......well, not exactly........I am just weird.  I can do almost
everything with both hands, except write.  Is it possible to be a little bit
left handed?

There was no twist to the loop, and I found clockwise to be quicker, easier
and makes it look nice and even.  when I did it the right way my stitches
were an ugly mess.

Thanks!

Michelle Giordano



Re: OT: Anyone Knit?
Doug&Michelle wrote:
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I think I'm a little faster with the yarn in my left hand, and I am
right-handed.  It has something to do with it being a shorter reach to
pick up the yarn.

--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth

Re: OT: Anyone Knit?
Doug&Michelle wrote:
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Being some left-handed and some right-handed called mixed dominance or
ambidexterity.  If you can truly do everything equally well with both
hands, you are bidextrous, not ambidextrous.

I can do just about everything with either hand except play tennis or
badminton -- for some unfathomable reason, I am programmed to do one
one-handed and the other the other-handed.  I can't tell you which is
which because I haven't tried either for years, but when I use the wrong
hand because I forget which hand I usually use, my hands remember and I
end up serving the racket over the net, not the ball/birdie.  Very
embarassing....  But I can eat either-handed, I can use chopsticks
either-handed, I have always written on paper with my left hand and on
blackboards with my right hand (sometimes switching off if there wasn't
enough room), and I sign (as in American Sign Language) partly
left-handed and partly right-handed, which drives people insane.

Re: OT: Anyone Knit?
Funny you should mention that but I am right handed but knit with my left
hand - I also carry my handbag on my left should so maybe I was destined to
be left handed.  I remember some one saying that I was knitting with my left
hand because I must have sat on the left of the friend who taught me to
knit - I learnt as a child.

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Re: OT: Anyone Knit?
I knit left handed because I copied my mother, who was left handed.  I never
saw the necessity to change.

However, I carry my handbag on my left shoulder because that was how you had
to carry it in the air force - leaving the right hand free to salute!!!

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Re: OT: Anyone Knit?
BigPond Internet Services uttered
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I'm right-handed - but can do many things, including writing on a white
board (confuses the cr@p outta students) with either hand. What I have
worked out is that the things I do left-handed, I was taught to do by my
Dad, who had the tendency walloped out of him at school, as they did in
the 1920s. This includes knitting. At 4, I could knit away happily
left-handed. At 5, Mum tried to get me to do it the "right" way round
... and I was 20 before I could do it again., and I'm still slow.

Knitting machines are great - esp when you've been zit-zotting away for
hours and suddenly, for no reason you can fathom, it all drops off and
lands on your foot. Weights and all. Even better when it's a 14-gauge
industrial you're bickering with.
--
AJH
no email address supplied

Re: OT: Anyone Knit?


On 2005-08-22 snipped-for-privacy@my.house said:
   >Newsgroups: alt.sewing
   >of BigPond Internet Services uttered
   >>Funny you should mention that but I am right handed but knit with
   >>my left hand - I also carry my handbag on my left should so maybe
   >>I was destined to be left handed.
I am mixed-dominant, left-handed for fine work, bat and similar
operations right, carry a shoulder-bag right.

   >>I remember some one saying that
   >>I was knitting with my left hand because I must have sat on the
   >>left of the friend who taught me to knit - I learnt as a child.
My daughter was totally right-handed, so when I was teaching her to
tie fishing nets I faced her when demonstrating, so she didn't have to
do any reversals.  Worked perfectly.

   >I'm right-handed - but can do many things, including writing on a
   >white board (confuses the cr@p outta students) with either hand.
My son started out ambidextrous, in early school made an arbitrary
decision to write right-handed.  I had a schoolmate who took notes
left-handed (faster), did essays right (neater).  Knew a guy who
normally wrote right-handed, when he switched to left wrote a
_perfect_ replica, but mirror image.


   >What I have worked out is that the things I do left-handed, I was
   >taught to do by my Dad, who had the tendency walloped out of him at
   >school, as they did in the 1920s.
A left-handed friend was forced by school-nuns to work right-handed
about the time they were teaching basic math.  He came from the
experience unable to do arithmetic.  Later, when freed from that
regime and allowed to revert to lefty, came out a whiz with the
later-taught algebra and calculus.





This includes knitting. At 4, I
   >could knit away happily left-handed. At 5, Mum tried to get me to
   >do it the "right" way round .... and I was 20 before I could do it
   >again., and I'm still slow.
   >Knitting machines are great - esp when you've been zit-zotting away
   >for hours and suddenly, for no reason you can fathom, it all drops
   >off and lands on your foot. Weights and all. Even better when it's
   >a 14-gauge industrial you're bickering with.
   >--
   >AJH
   >no email address supplied

Tom Willmon
Mountainair, (mid) New Mexico, USA

Abandon the search for truth; settle on a good fantasy!

Net-Tamer V 1.12.0 - Registered

Re: OT: Anyone Knit?

I suspect that the books were trying to teach you western
knitting and you unvented eastern knitting.  

The names were given, originally, because western was
popular in western Europe and eastern was popular in eastern
Europe -- or something of the sort.  I prefer to say that
when you sit facing north, the fronts of your western
stitches face west, and the fronts of your eastern stitches
face east.  

That is, western stitches face west if  you knit off the
left needle onto the right needle, which is the more-common
method.  If you knit off the right needle onto the left
needle, you have to sit facing south to make it work.  

I think we ought to call these two directions "northern" and
"southern" to correspond to "eastern" and "western", but we
have no names for them at all -- though off the right onto
the left is called by many clumsy, inapt names:  "wrong way
knitting", "mirror knitting", "left-handed knitting", and
"knitting back backwards" are all I can recall off hand.  

Quite a lot of people have learned to knit in both
directions so that they can knit flat without having to turn
the work over.  I never learned to purl southern style, but
I can manage to knit off the right needle onto the left well
enough to manage bobbles and the pointed garter-stitch
edging from Medrith Glover's peacock.  Which I have to
re-design[1] into purling on the front rows to get around my
inability to purl on the back rows.

As has been previously mentioned, Mary Thomas's two-volume
set (_M.T.'s Knitting Book_ and _M.T.'s Book of Knitting
Patterns_) is the work to take to a desert island if you've
only room for one knitting reference in your trunk.  

Anything by Elizabeth Zimmermann is good, and her _Knitting
Without Tears_ is required reading.  

Once you think you can knit a whole sweater, you need to
read Barbara Walker's _Knitting from the Top_, to see how
easy it is to design sweaters that fit perfectly.  She has
also written three stitch treasuries -- all four books are
have been reprinted by Schoolhouse Press.  (And, of course,
Schoolhouse keeps all of E.Z.'s works in print.)  

Vurra strange:  even if you throw in all my embroidery books
and a box of iced-tea spoons, my sewing books take up less
of my needlework shelf than my knitting books do -- and *not
one* of the sewing books is a must-read, while nearly all of
my knitting books are books I could recommend with
enthusiasm.  

Is it just that Mommy taught me how to sew long before I
started collecting books, or is sewing so complex that no
one book can be definitive?

Joy Beeson
--
http://home.earthlink.net/~joybeeson/ -- needlework
http://home.earthlink.net/~dbeeson594/ROUGHSEW/ROUGH.HTM
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Re: Anyone Knit?
Doug&Michelle wrote:
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I can't find a hand-knitting newsgroup. There's a yarn one, but it includes
spinning. There are lots of yahoo mailing lists, mostly for specialised
interests or locations.

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You're twisting the stitch. You can either learn to do it the right way, or
you can knit or purl into the back of the stitch on the next row. You'll
find purling easier whichever you do. Also, when you look at your work from
the knit side, all your stitches will be in straight vertical rows instead
of slanting in alternate directions.

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I also find large needles hard work. They make my hands ache. I'm happiest
with 4 - 5.5 mm, which is about right for doubvle knit (UK)/worsted (US) or
Aran weights. Also, I think the fashionable novelty yarns like eyelash and
ladder yarns are quite difficult because you can't see the stitches very
well and it's well-nigh impossible to see a dropped stitch.

I think the easiest yarns for a beginner are medium weight wool or wool-mix,
because wool is forgiving, elastic and it stays if you drop a stitch.

There are lots of free patterns on the net. If you go to www.knitty.com you
can sign up to be notified about Knitty, a free on-line magazine that's
published quarterly. There are some very nice patterns in the archives. If
you want a project that's simple but looks more interesting than a
stocking-stitch scarf, look at Clapotis,
http://knitty.com/ISSUEfall04/PATTclapotis.html . You can make it in any
yarn: just choose needles that give you a fabric you like and stop
increasing when it's wide enough. The Vegan Fox,
http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEfall02/PATTveganfox.html , is slightly more
advanced only because it uses fancy yarns, and it's a real
conversation-opener (but not really vegan because it used merino wool).

Knitting is great: it's portable, and you can get great results using just
knit, purl, increase and decrease.

Let me know if you want to be walked though any instructions.


--
Sally Holmes
Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England



Re: Anyone Knit?

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 rec.crafts.textiles.yarn
 yes, it does cover spinning, weaving, dyeing, crochet &
knitting, but it's mostly knitting.

 i also knit 'incorrectly'... i knit through the back loop
apparently... but if i get the same effect, i don't really
care :) i *can* do it the "right" way if i concentrate, but if
you knit beads, you need to knit the way i do or the beads
don't stay on the surface <shrug>
lee
--
war is peace
freedom is slavery
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Re: Anyone Knit?
Sally Holmes wrote:
-----snip--------
  The Vegan Fox,
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My vegan son wears wool socks.  Properly done, shearing sheep does not
hurt them, and actually helps since without shearing, the wool grows
longer and longer, tangling and overheating the sheep in the summer
months.  I suppose a case could be made for exploiting the sheep, but on
the other hand, if the wool weren't so valued, they might not live as
long or be so cared for.

--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth

Re: Anyone Knit?
On Tue, 23 Aug 2005 11:00:10 GMT, "Sally Holmes"

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There are several hand-knitting mailing lists.  Techknit is
the most focussed:  there are very few posts, but every one
is on topic.    http://fibergypsy.com/TechKnit/index.shtml
has links to the FAQ and a subscription form, or you can
send email to snipped-for-privacy@peak.org with "subscribe techknit"
or "subscribe techknit-digest" as the message.  (No quote
marks, of course.)

In the course of finding the subscription information, I
turned up a list of all the knitting lists at
http://www.woolworks.org/maillists.html .


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Let me add that a sock in fine yarn fits into any purse, and
you always need new socks.  But it will be a while before
you fill up the house with sweaters and afghans, and need
*that* advice.  (I can't concentrate without something to do
with my hands; carrying a sock-in-progress saves me from
twisting my pigtail off.)  

Joy Beeson
--
http://home.earthlink.net/~joybeeson/ -- needlework
http://home.earthlink.net/~dbeeson594/ROUGHSEW/ROUGH.HTM
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Re: Anyone Knit?
joy beeson wrote:

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...and if the idea of using four or five needles to knit a sock makes you
think of wrestling with a hedgehog, you can knit them on two circulars
instead.

Once you get blase about being able to do that, you can move onto knitting
two socks at once on two circulars, thus avoiding the dreaded Second Sock
Syndrome (when you feel that you have a finished item, so why should you
want to start another one the same?).

There's lots of lovely sock yarn around: Google for
*"sock yarn" opal*
or
*"sock yarn" regia*
to see some of the offerings, including ones that make stripes and fair isle
patterns automatically as you knit. Note, however, that I find the wool and
nylon blends too hot for all but the coldest days, although DD likes them
(she always has cold feet).

A good on-line resource for sock knitting is www.socknitters.com, where
there are hundreds of patterns and techniques. Try Kim Salazar's Toe Up
Socks for a change from knitting from the cuff down.

I really like Priscilla Gibson-Roberts' Simple Socks book for making nice
socks that fit.

As further enabling, look at the gorgeous designs at
http://www.whiteliesdesigns.com/patterns/ladies.html . Note the flattering
shaping. Then look at http://www.fiddlesticksknitting.com/Shawls.html : all
these designs are made from yarnover increases and simple decreases.

We haven't even started on Addi Turbos vs rosewood needles, short-row bust
darts or luxury yarns.

Sally, always happy to enable a fibre habit.
Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England




Re: Anyone Knit?
Sally Holmes wrote:
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I got some wonderful cotton-spandex yarn for socks from Ileen's -- I
just emailed and talked to her on the phone, she's fantastic.  Not so
good for you U.K. folks, but in the U.S., look at http://www.ileen.com/
for coned yarns.  I have no connection other than being a happy customer.
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth

Re: Anyone Knit?
*sigh*  I would love to knit socks that would fit my industrial-strength
calves.  If I could find a foolproof pattern that would increase to fit,
I'd love to tackle trying to knit them.

Sally Holmes wrote:
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Re: Anyone Knit?
Melinda Meahan - take out TRASH to reply wrote:
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Start at the top with the cuff, using a leg-warmer pattern.  When you
have the length you want, start decreasing evenly around no closer than
every 10 or 15 stitches, and 3 or 4 rows between.  Keep careful notes so
that you can duplicate it on the second sock if it works out for you.  I
would also do this in wool or that cotton-spandex so that your sock has
lots of stretch but holds its shape.

--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth

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