Sad Commentary

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I was in TSWLTH this evening to buy several spools of Gutterman's
thread at half price.  They were OUT of black, and had only the
small spools of the red I needed for sewing DGD's kilt.

I asked a clerk at the cutting table where I would find "hair
canvas".  She had no idea what I was talking about.  I explained
that it was special interfacing.  She called someone, who also
did not know.  Called a manager, who didn't "think" they carried
it...

Just makes me sad.

Beverly, about to go online to find sewing supplies.  Again.



Re: Sad Commentary
BEI Design wrote:
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The other side of that coin is that you *can* go online, and you *can*
get what you need. Not too many years ago, most everyone lived in a town
or on a farm and had to make a rare trip to the city to stock up -- and
that was only if they were able to go and could afford the cost.
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: Sad Commentary


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Ok, I needed that.  I was thinking there was no silver lining.  I
quite vividly remember my mother's "trips to town" to buy items
which were not available locally.  And "downtown" was the only
place to go for holiday shopping, etc.  We lived in a small town
20 miles south of Portland.

Thanks, Joanne.

So far my bookmarked sites have not yielded "hair canvas
interfacing", nor has Google been much help.  I'm headed tomorrow
to a large local fabric store, I'm pretty sure they will have it.
At least they had it 24 years ago when I made DH's three-piece
suit.  ;-}

Beverly



Re: Sad Commentary
BEI Design wrote:
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If you recall, and I think you probably do, we "dressed" to go to town,
too.  Mother wore stockings and a girdle, hat and gloves.  I don't ever
dress like that, ever, ever.  I really love shopping on-line at any time
of the day or night, in my comfy flannel nighty, too.  LOL!

What about http://www.newarkdress.com/SewInInterfacings.html ?
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: Sad Commentary

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I do indeed recall "dressing" to go downtown.  It was a always
*special occasion* requiring all the above, and the hosiery had
nice straight seams down the back of the leg.

Right after Portland city planners instituted a one-way street
grid downtown, my mother took my sister and me downtown in the
car to show us where we would catch the streetcar back home (our
dentist was in town).  She followed the streetcar along the
route, right onto a one-way street the *wrong* way.  She received
a stern lecture form a nice traffic cop, but no ticket as the
system was new, and streetcars were allowed to go against traffic
on that street.  It was cheaper than moving the tracks and
overhead electrical supply.

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I love online shopping but miss the whole "downtown" experience.
Now, people in town dress as for the beach....

Last Christmas, after Macy's took over the local 149-year-old
local department store, I took the family for one last special
brunch at the 10th floor Georgian Room, and a last look at all
the beautifully decorated windows.  We will miss that experience.

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AHA!  An even better price than Sharon's site.  Will you be my
sister?

Beverly



Re: Sad Commentary


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Now the Downtown shopping experience means eating in the food court. I
have a very strong dislike for that kind of food. I also have a strong
dislike for Macy's. They are very expensive, but worse than that no
longer carry the several brands of clothing that I can count on for a
decent fit in RTW. They have their own brands and some very expensive
designer brands. I'm not a happy shopper.
Juno

Re: Sad Commentary
Juno wrote:

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My husband goes to London about once a year, and I send him to Marks &
Spencer to buy underwear, socks, some knit shirts, and last year he got
a pair of corduroy pants.  Admittedly, the exchange rate befuddles him,
and he spends more than he would be willing to spend here, but he gets
such good quality for the money.  He also gets a much better fit.

This is probably not a solution for everyone.
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: Sad Commentary
Pogonip wrote:
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I buy underwear, socks, school/work shirts and trousers, and other stuff
like that for James & Alan in BHS (Bristish Home Stores), which is very
like M&S and less expensive.  Multi-packs of socks and pants work out at
about 1 a pair ni their cheap & cheerful ranges, which are quite good
enough for a growing lad, or fopr Alan to mislay in hotels and hire cars
(not that he has - yet!).

Compared with places like Next and other high street fashion stores and
the departments stores, both M&S and BHS are very good value for money.

As for hair canvas: here in the UK my first port of call is SidTrim in
Leeds.  After theat I look at McCullis wand wallace in London, but they
are usually a lot more expensive.  Both places do mail order.  I've also
occsionally had it from Croft Mill, but you have to grab it when you see
it there, rather than being able to buy it when you want it.

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: Sad Commentary
BEI Design wrote:
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LOL!  You mean we aren't already???
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: Sad Commentary

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Well I don't remember going through the whole
slice-the-thumbs-and-press-them-together blood sister ritual, but
if you say so, it must be so. <VBG>

Beverly



Re: Sad Commentary
BEI Design wrote:
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Well, we're not members of the Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants, but
maybe we are of the Sisterhood of the Mended Pants.

--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: Sad Commentary

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<Giggle>  I was not familiar with the movie until just now.
Looks fun.

I watched Clint Eastwood's "Flags of out Fathers' tonight.  I'm
conflicted...
:-|

Beverly




Re: Sad Commentary


"out" S/B "Our"



Re: Sad Commentary
BEI Design wrote:
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A friend sent me the following, which while off-topic for sewing, is
very on-topic for the kind of relationships formed here:

UCLA Study on Friendship Among Women By Gale Berkowitz 10-29-06


A landmark UCLA study suggests friendships between women are special.
They shape who we are and who we are yet to be. They soothe our
tumultuous inner world, fill the emotional gaps in our marriage, and
help us remember who we really are. By the way, they may do even
more.


Scientists now suspect that hanging out with our friends can actually
counteract the kind of stomach-quivering stress most of us experience
on a daily basis. A landmark UCLA study suggests that women respond
to stress with a cascade of brain chemicals that cause us to make and
maintain friendships with other women.


It's a stunning find that has turned five decades of stress research
-- most of it on men -- upside down. "Until this study was published,
scientists generally believed that when people experience stress,
they trigger a hormonal cascade that revs the  body to either stand
and fight or flee as fast as possible," explains Laura Cousino Klein,
Ph.D., now an Assistant Professor of Biobehavioral Health at Penn
State University and one of the study's authors.  "It's an ancient
survival mechanism left over from the time we were chased across the
planet by saber-toothed tigers".


Now the researchers suspect that women have a larger behavioral
repertoire than just "fight or flight."  "In fact," says Dr. Klein,
"it seems that when the hormone oxytocin is released as part of the
stress responses in a woman, it buffers the "fight or flight"
response and encourages her to tend children and gather with other
women instead. When she actually engages in this tending or
befriending, studies suggest that more oxytocin is released, which
further counters stress and produces a calming effect. This calming
response does not occur in men", says Dr. Klein, "because
testosterone -which men produce in high levels when they're under
stress -- seems to reduce the effects of oxytocin. "Estrogen", she
adds, "seems to enhance it."


The discovery that women respond to stress differently than men was
made in a classic "aha!" moment shared by two women scientists who
were talking one day in a lab at UCLA. "There was this joke that when
the women who worked in the lab were stressed, they came in, cleaned
the lab, had coffee, and bonded", says Dr. Klein.  "When the men were
stressed, they holed up somewhere on their own. I commented one day
to fellow researcher Shelley Taylor that nearly 90% of the stress
research is on males. I showed her the data from my lab, and the two
of us knew instantly that we were onto something."


The women cleared their schedules and started meeting with one
scientist after another from various research specialties. Very
quickly, Drs. Klein and Taylor discovered that by not including women
in stress research, scientists had made a huge mistake: The fact that
women respond to stress differently than men has significant
implications for our health.


It may take some time for new studies to reveal all the ways that
oxytocin encourages us to care for children and hang out with other
women, but the "tend and befriend" notion developed by Drs. Klein and
Taylor may explain why women consistently outlive men. Study after
study has found that social ties reduce our risk of disease by
lowering blood pressure, heart rate, and cholesterol.


"There's no doubt," says Dr. Klein, "that friends are helping us
live." In one study, for example, researchers found that people who
had no friends increased their risk of death over a 6-month period.
In another study, those who had the most friends over a 9-year period
cut their risk of death by more than 60%.


Friends are also helping us live better. The famed Nurses' Health
Study from Harvard Medical School found that the more friends women
had, the less likely they were to develop physical impairments as
they aged, and the more likely they were to be leading a joyful life.
In fact, the results were so significant, the researchers concluded,
that not having close friends or confidantes was as detrimental to
your health as smoking or carrying extra weight!


And that's not all! When the researchers looked at how well the women
functioned after the death of their spouse, they found that even in
the face of this biggest stressor of all, those women who had a close
friend confidante were more likely to survive the experience without
any new physical impairments or permanent loss of vitality. Those
without friends were not always so fortunate.


Yet if friends counter the stress that seems to swallow up so much of
our life these days, if they keep us healthy and even add years to
our life, why is it so hard to find time to be with them? That's a
question that also troubles researcher Ruthellen Josselson, Ph.D.,
co-author of "Best Friends: The Pleasures and Perils of Girls' and
Women's Friendships (Three Rivers Press, 1998).


"Every time we get overly busy with work and family, the first thing
we do is let go of friendships with other women," explains Dr.
Josselson. We push them right to the back burner. That's really a
mistake because women are such a source of strength to each other.
We nurture one another. And we need to have un pressured space in
which we can do the special kind of talk that women do when they're
with other women.  It's a very healing experience."


Taylor, S. E., Klein, L.C., Lewis, B. P., Gruenewald, T. L., Gurung,
R.A.R., & Updegraff, J. A. "Female Responses to Stress: Tend and
Befriend, Not Fight or Flight", Psychological Review, 107(3), 41-429.


--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: Sad Commentary

<snip most of interesting article>

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I can without hesitation testify to the accuracy of that
paragraph.  Although it has taken me 5+ years to fully "survive"
DH's death, I am certainly no worse off physically now than
before his death, and may actually be better, because I walk
regularly now, and did not while he was alive.  I do value my
many female friends, both here and in real space.

Beverly



Re: Sad Commentary
BEI Design wrote:
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It is interesting that other women we have never seen, nor heard their
voices, count among our friends and we share personal experiences and
feelings just as we do with those we meet face to face.  In some cases,
our on-line friends give more support because we can reach out to them
at any time - a telephone call or personal visit would not be so
welcome, even by a close friend, at 2 or 3 in the morning.  We may have
to wait for a response, but sometimes it is the expressing that is more
important.

--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: Sad Commentary
I doubt I have ever agreed with anything more than I do with your statement
her, Joanne.
Emily



Re: Sad Commentary
CypSew wrote:
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It has been a great resource and source of support to me, and I am
grateful for it.

--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: Sad Commentary
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http://www.freewebs.com/prickedfingersociety /
--
------------------------------------------------------
Wendy Z            Chicago, IL       (Moo)
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Re: Sad Commentary
zski wrote:
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That is cool!!
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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