sewing in Cambodia

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http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/0316/p11s02-lihc.html



Re: sewing in Cambodia


Thanks for the article, Penny. I'd love to know what he paid for the 6
shirts and wish I could have seen a picture of them. I'll be he paid next to
nothing for the ruah job. It is good to know that these women have a way to
support themselves. I'm sure they would be in desparate condition if they
hadn't learned to do the sewing. We in this country just don't know how well
off we are. I think this article makes you really see how other live.
Juno
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Re: sewing in Cambodia


http://newsguy.com uttered
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Lovely article - thanks, Penny
--
AJH
no email address supplied

Re: sewing in Cambodia


small change wrote:
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If anyone has 'spare' treadle or hand-crank machines in the Singer 66
and 15 classes, these projects can use them, and somewhere there's a
program for shipping them off.  I'll see what I can find out.  I say 66
and 15 because the bobbins and needles are standard and still readily
available and cheap.  The old long bobbin shuttle machines are not so
easy to get the bits for.

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: sewing in Cambodia


Dicey of  uttered
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Is that the "Tools for Self-reliance" scheme? They're usually after
serviceable garden tools etc too.
--
AJH
no email address supplied

Re: sewing in Cambodia


She who would like to be obeyed once every Preston Guild wrote:

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That's one lot:  http://www.tfsr.org/tools.htm

Workaid was another: http://www.workaid.org /
They have sufficient sewing machines at present.

If you find a charity like these to send the old machines to, please
include half a dozen bobbins and a new, sealed bottle of oil.  It's also
a good idea to include a screwdriver or two of the right sizes, and the
manual!

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: sewing in Cambodia


Please let us know - there's a freecycler in my area trying to find a home
for her old treadle machine even as I type.

A
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Re: sewing in Cambodia


Angrie.Woman of SBC http://yahoo.sbc.com uttered
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Darn - there's a freecycler here in Leeds would like one in order to
build a geodesic dome ... but I think it's a bit far to arrange a
pick-up ...

BTW, Colin the Freecycle Cat has settled in nicely!

--
AJH
no email address supplied

Re: sewing in Cambodia


Kate Dicey wrote:
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Well, now a picture that I saw in a newspaper begins to make some
scence. A year or two ago I saw a very interesting photo. Apparently,
the Cambodian goverment was in the process of demilitarizing and it was
mustering out 700 soldiers. Each solder was to be given several items to
take back to their villages. The photograph showed a field in which you
could see 700 suzuki motorcycles,each with spare tires over the
handlebars and next to each motorbike was a treadle sewing machine.

Re: sewing in Cambodia


wrote:

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They were going to train on the treadles before letting them loose on
the bikes.  Either that, or the wives had to pedal them home.  : o

Allan.

Re: (gettingO.T.)sewing in Cambodia


That reminds me of a print out that my daughter gave me that people who sew
a lot drive faster becouse they are used to putting the foot down on the
sewing machine and unintentionaly do so with the accelerater pedal.
Wonder if that perverse logic would stand up in court.
"sorry your honour, It's just that I've been flat out sewing, what with the
wedding dress, school concert costumes etc. all due this week I forgot that
I was in the car and not at the sewing machine"! ...Amelia
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Re: (gettingO.T.)sewing in Cambodia


romanyroamer wrote:

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Sewing rage... ;P
--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: (gettingO.T.)sewing in Cambodia


Dicey of Customer of PlusNet plc (http://www.plus.net ) uttered
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Been at the crepe-backed satin again?
--
AJH
no email address supplied

Re: (gettingO.T.)sewing in Cambodi: now Sewing Rage and Crepe Backed Sating Revisited!


She who would like to be obeyed once every Preston Guild wrote:

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25m in scarlet arrived Friday morning, plus 25m of matching lining.  I
am going to make 5 bridesmaids outfits out of it.  Two of the tops will
be the halter neck one from McCalls pattern 3958, and three will be
based on this pattern, but converted to straps straight over the
shoulders, as one of the ladies is large busted and wary of halter
necks.  The skits will be the same style as the pink ones on my web
site, but will look a bit less crisp due to the drapy nature of the
satin back crepe - made satin side out!  to give the skirts a bit of a
chance to spread out at the hem and display the demi=train, I'm thinking
some light weight horsehair braid in the hems...  I bought a whole roll
at Dainty at the weekend, in case it was needed.  if not, the stash will
benefit, and some day I'll use it on another project.

Actually, for crepe/satin, it ain't half bad, and it was only 3 per m
for 60" wide...

I know 5m per lass sounds generous, but there will be big triangles left
over from the skirt, and we wanted plenty in case of mind-changing...

This project won't be going on the web site: the hubby-to-be was stalked
and is, naturally, wary.  But I will have pix for future customers to
see, and I will use some of the processes for teaching pages - like how
to sew poly crepe backed satin successfully!

So far I have measured two of the lasses - we had a real giggle
yesterday when they came over.  The two younger ones (who will have the
halter necks) will be measured the week after next, during half term,
and the last lass should make it some time before then.  I'll then have
a better idea about whether or not I can use the one pattern, or if I
need to buy any more copies.  I think I have enough boning...
--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: (gettingO.T.)sewing in Cambodi: now Sewing Rage and Crepe Backed Sating Revisited!


I have just finished a BROWN and GREEN wedding dress. Traditinal design.
Deep dark green satin with strong milky coffee coloured lace. The bride is
getting married in the bush (2nd. marriage). I hated it. It just felt a
wrong colour combination and I was worried she would change her mind. I kept
putting it of, but in the end it looked fantastic on her!
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Re: (gettingO.T.)sewing in Cambodi: now Sewing Rage and Crepe Backed Sating Revisited!


romanyroamer wrote:
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Do you have pix?  I'd love to see this creation!  I'm sure it looked
fantastic, if unconventional.
--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: (gettingO.T.)sewing in Cambodi: now Sewing Rage and Crepe BackedSating Revisited!


Kate Dicey wrote:
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Aren't white wedding dresses something relatively new?  At least, 20th
century.  My first wedding (yes, I've had more than one) I wore a blue
dress with a lace overskirt and jacket.  It was a short dress, and an
afternoon wedding.  My mother wore a suit when she married, as did most
of her contemporaries.  Then about 1950 there was quite an upsurge in
white wedding dresses of full-length, that before that time were
unusual, IIRC, and limited to the wealthier brides.
--

Joanne @ stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us
http://bernardschopen.tripod.com /
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Re: (gettingO.T.)sewing in Cambodi: now Sewing Rage and Crepe BackedSating Revisited!



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white wedding dresses were Queen Victoria's fault. she chose
white, the upper classes had to follow.
 up until that time your wedding dress was your *good* dress,
one that you would be wearing to special occaisions for years
after. way back when i was in my late teens (late 60s) i
worked on a wedding dress fashion show for the ladies of my
mum's church. one of the gowns we had donated (!) was a 1790s
red & blue plaid taffeta
 before Victoria, blue was a fairly common color for western
wedding/best gowns because blue is the color of faithfulness.
lee

Re: (gettingO.T.)sewing in Cambodi: now Sewing Rage and Crepe BackedSating Revisited!


white wedding dresses were Queen Victoria's fault. she chose
white, the upper classes had to follow.
 up until that time your wedding dress was your *good* dress,
one that you would be wearing to special occasions for years
after. way back when I was in my late teens (late 60s) I
worked on a wedding dress fashion show for the ladies of my
mum's church. one of the gowns we had donated (!) was a 1790s
red & blue plaid taffeta
 before Victoria, blue was a fairly common color for western
wedding/best gowns because blue is the color of faithfulness.
lee

I used to be involved in a 'historical' fashion show. One of the items was a
black Victorian wedding dress. The commentary went 'A wedding had been
arranged. There was a death in the family. The wedding went ahead but the
bride wore black.'

--
Sewingsue in Scotland



Re: (gettingO.T.)sewing in Cambodi: now Sewing Rage and Crepe BackedSating Revisited!


enigma wrote:
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This makes a good deal of sense.  It's a new development of our
affluence that anyone other than the very rich can afford to spend a
large amount of money on a dress to be worn only once.  In fact, the
richer people I know usually won't do it.  ;-)  A relative's dress comes
out of mothballs and is adjusted, or they elope.  The rich didn't become
rich by throwing money away.
--

Joanne @ stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us
http://bernardschopen.tripod.com /
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

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