Sewing new tweeds

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I'm making a  slightly flared skirt with wool mix new tweed type
material. It is a pull on skirt so no zip.

Can anyone tell me the best way to make the seams lie flat - type of
seam and finish - and whether I should sew from the top down or the
bottom up?

Many thanks

Susan
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Re: Sewing new tweeds
S R Glickman wrote:
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First of all, what is the mix?  Type of other fiber and proportion??
(Yes, it makes a difference.)

With all wool or nearly all wool - pressing, pressing, pressing.

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans.

Re: Sewing new tweeds
I think it's 40% wool and the rest is synthetics.

It was in a sale and I'm not sure exactly what the other fibers were.

Does that help?

Susan
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Re: Sewing new tweeds

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Yeah that helps.  Since it has such a high poly content, you want to treat
it more like that than wool.  It may still shrink though if washed later on.
(I normally wash my wool blends if the wool is less than 50%.)  Preshrink
now if you intend on washing it later.  If you intend to dry clean (the toss
in the dryer sheets work pretty well) then you will want to press and STEAM
it---Use a press cloth!!

Do not get the iron too hot.  You will have an unsalvageable mess on your
hands if you do.  The wool will get shiny and the poly will scorch.  Ick.
So just be aware of that.  Any extreme pressing you need to do, use a low
temp but longer pressing time and a pressing cloth.

As for getting the seams to lie flat, shouldn't be a problem.  Do you have a
serger?  You can use that to overcast the edges.  You could do Hong Kong
finish if you really want it spiffy.  But mostly what you need to do to get
really fabulous looking seams is to press each one as you stitch it.  Press
it with steam as you sewed it.  That sets the stitches.  Then press it open
if you like.  Shouldn't be a major problem...

I have NEVER come across a situation where it was better to sew from the hem
to the waist on a skirt.  Not once in 20 years.  I know there are some out
there who suggest sewing from the bottom up.  I personally think they're
nuttier than a fruitcake.  It's more important that the garment be properly
aligned at the top...true for a blouse, true for a skirt, true for pants,
etc.  It's also always easier to even things out at the hem if you have one
piece end up slightly longer than another.  You are going to cut some off
the hem anyway.

Sharon

(it's early sorry if I'm grumpy)

--
Never try to teach a pig to sing.  It's a waste of time and just annoys the
pig.



Re: Sewing new tweeds
Thanks for replying. Not grumpy at all !!

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Unfortunately not. Though I wouldn't say no if I was offered one :))


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I shall try that then.


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That's what I thought but I've had problems with various fabrics going
wavy or bumpy at the seams that I thought I'd better check.

Any special needle?  

Thanks

Susan




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Re: Sewing new tweeds

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Oh good.  Glad I wasn't grumpy.  lol  Fell asleep around 7:30 last night
woke up at 3:00 this morning gave up on going back to sleep around 4:00.
*sigh*  Should be an interesting day!  lol

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have a

lol  I understand completely.  ;)  I almost never say to use these, but if
you have pinking shears, use them to trim the edge of the seam allowance.
That will limit raveling inside there.  If you really want to make the seam
allowances beautiful on the inside (and this has more to do with making it a
Fabulously Made skirt than seams laying flat) go ahead and do Hong Kong
finish.  That's where you put bias tape over the edge of each side of the
seam allowance.  It looks beautiful and will really make the skirt wear
well.  All in what you want to put in it.

This is a good link to explain a lot of seam finishes.
http://ianrpubs.unl.edu/textiles/heg147.htm

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OK!  This gives me more to work with also.  ;)  First the best kind of
needle is a New needle.  ;)  I would think a medium weight, universal needle
would do you.  Like a Schmetz 80.  (my preferred brand.  Easy to find and
works in all sorts of machines.)

The wavy and bumpy you've gotten in the past may have to do with a couple
things.  First off...if you've not changed your needle recently.  This may
shock you, it sends some people into fits, but it's really best to change
the needle for each garment you make.  Now, if all you do is a hem or mend a
small tear, it's fine to still use that needle.  If you make an entire
garment change it.  Ron has had this on his website a long time:
http://www.a1sewingmachine.com/needles.htm Good, graphic demonstration of
why to change them frequently huh?  ;)

Ok.  Now the other frequent cause for wavy seams is how you are holding the
fabric as you sew.  For most things, you want to try Taut Sewing.  That
means you hold in front of and behind the needle.  Right hand in front, left
hand behind.  (Even if you're a leftie, it's how the machine is shaped that
counts here.)  You want Equal grip on both sides.  The idea is to keep the
fabric taut, but Not to stretch it in either direction. Too remember you are
not pulling the fabric through the machine, the machine is pulling the
fabric through the machine.  ;)

See if those two things help. And let me know how the skirt goes!!!

Sharon

--
Never try to teach a pig to sing.  It's a waste of time and just annoys the
pig.



Re: Sewing new tweeds
Thanks for your help.


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I decided just to oversew the edges with a 3 point zigzag. This I then
pressed again and the seams seam ( :)) )  to be lying nice and flat.

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Brilliant  - thanks.


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I used an 80 sharp in the end and that was OK.


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I do try and change the needle at the beginning of each garment.

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This could well be something to do with it.

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Thanks.

The skirt is now finished and has worked quite well.  Much better than
the biased version which I attempted first  and hung all wrong and
went even worse when I did the hem.

Just as well this was sale fabric and the lady was very generous in
her measuring. It was actually sample fabric the company, Penny Plain,
had had made up for their own outfits.  A couple of times a year they
have a sale of sample garments and fabrics at their Newcastle (UK)
main branch. Great bargains in good quality fabrics. Their normal
stock is quite pricey so It's even more of a bargain to get this
material for less than £5 a metre!

Thanks again.

Susan
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Re: Sewing new tweeds

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Yay!!!  I'm so glad it turned out well and you are happy with it.  :) Glad
to be of any help.

There are several tricks to bias skirts.  You need to remember to cut one
(say the front) on the bias with it tilting to the right.  Then cut the back
with it tilting in the opposite direction.  This eliminates the skirt
twisting around your body when you wear it.  (I think Kate has a page on her
site about this.  If you have her site bookmarked, poke around and see if
you can find it.  She's such a great teacher!)  Also, you want to let the
garment hang for at least 24 hours, longer if you can before you hem it.
That way if it's going to stretch (and they almost always do!) as the bias
relaxes you won't get an uneven hem.  Then again, there are just some
fabrics that don't do well in bias garments.  Unfortunately, that last part
is mostly trial and error....as a rule you don't want to use loosely woven
fabrics.  They Really stretch on the bias.  So think tightly woven fabrics,
and the next time you want to try a bias skirt, go for a solid color.  That
way all you have to do is concentrate on constructing something bias cut,
and not matching plaids or stripes, etc.  :)

Remember too sometimes the best learning opportunities are postmortem
examinations of garments that Don't Work for whatever reason.  So just look
at the bias skirt in that light.  ;)

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Oooooh!!!!  Really great fabric On Sale!!!!  Yay!!!  That's always the very
best.  :)

Sharon

--
Never try to teach a pig to sing.  It's a waste of time and just annoys the
pig.



Re: Sewing new tweeds
wrote:


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Thanks again.


I just placed it the way the pattern showed you - I think!


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Hear, Hear !!!


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I did try that...


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Do all fabrics cling in all the wrong places when cut on the bias?


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Ok.  I decided it was better not to try to salvage the fabric for
anything else given that it had hung and stretched.

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 :))

Thanks again

Susan

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Re: Sewing new tweeds
S R Glickman wrote:

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Unfortunately, most pattern layouts are for the most economical layout
rather than for the best garment result!

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<Blushes furiously>  Yup - the Bias Cut Disaster page!

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Yes!  You need to be a stick insect for a bulge-free look...  BUT bias
cut things that are PROPERLY fitted are very flattering to all but
exaggerated hour-glass figures.  Oh, and remember to wear seam-free
undies or line the skirt!
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Lie it out flat, steam it without letting the iron touch the fabric,
pull back into shape, and use it for fun projects like bias cut plaid
Christmas stockings!  :)

Sorry not to have been in on this before, but the thread popped up just
as I was packing for three days in The Frozen North (i.e. up near
Newcastle Upon Tyne - 350 miles due north of where I live).

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: Sewing new tweeds
On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 21:53:22 +0000, Kate Dicey


Thanks for replying.


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I can sometimes save fabric by moving pieces around but I take the
point.

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Must have a look at that.


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Ok.


I'll bear that in mind - at least I know not to put it in recycling
quite yet.

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That's near me !  


Thanks again


Susan
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Re: Sewing new tweeds
S R Glickman wrote:

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Aha!  We were staying in Washington - FIL lives in South Shields.

I spent Saturday morning at Dainty Supplies, about a mile from where my
friends live.

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You're welcome.
--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: Sewing new tweeds now clearly OT


Kate Dicey wrote:

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Miles? I thought all the EU countries had gone metric and the roads are
in km
[except Sweden, which has swedish miles, written svenska mil = 10m!
or has UK just compromised that they must price and sell groceries only
in kg.
Is gasoline (bensine) sold in imperial gallons still or is that liters now?

klh in VA

Re: Sewing new tweeds now clearly OT
klh wrote:
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Oh, we tend to use both, as and when...  Have done since 1971, when the
money was converted.  I get weighed in stones and pounds at Weight
Watchers, but some of our younger members like kilos.

Petrol/fuel is priced and sold in litres, but cars are still run on mpg,
and speed limits are in mph.  Roads are still in miles.  And we still
weep at the price of a gallon of petrol!

Because of excise duty, pubs still sell pints of beer - and that's
unlikely to change in a hurry!  I think whiskey and spirits are still
sold by the gil!

Horse racing is still in furlongs...

Veg are usually advertised both ways, and you can ask for either in most
market stalls and greengrocers.  The scales are such that you weigh in
pounds, press the switch to convert, and they get priced correctly in
kilos!  Magic - we can buy a pound of tomatoes and still abide by those
silly EU rules!

Fabric can be bought either way in most places I shop - especially the
Indian shops.  But again, one often buys metres of fabric 45"  or 60"
wide!  :)

Are you confused?  WE aren't!  ;D

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Sewing new tweeds now clearly OT


Kate Dicey wrote:

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in the us, my volvo does all the mile stuff but the temp display is set
to C.
and my indoor/outdoor thermo display is set to C also.
in the kitchen, we have a list of C<->F taped to a cabinet door
as well as measurement conversions

conversion and dual operation isn't a problem anymore.
I wish the US government would finish the conversion rules but that is
small stuff compared to their other isues!
I did see a highway speed limit sign in Tennessee last month in km/hr as
well as miles per hour!

oh well... our viking machines have both measures built in.

klh in VA USA

Re: Sewing new tweeds now clearly OT

klh skrev:


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No, one Swedish mil =3D 10 KILOMETERS, not meters. Someone could get very
lost!!! :-)

God Jul och Gott Nytt =C5r from Sweden!!!

Erin


Re: Sewing new tweeds now clearly OT
Thank you, Erin, and a good Noel and New Year to you and yours.

Jean M.


klh skrev:


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No, one Swedish mil = 10 KILOMETERS, not meters. Someone could get very
lost!!! :-)

God Jul och Gott Nytt År from Sweden!!!

Erin



Re: Sewing new tweeds now clearly OT
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oops my tangentbord dropped a k .... en mil is definitely not same as 1 m!
typed too quickly and sent same.
thanks for the correction!


Museumbitch wrote:

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<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
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oops my tangentbord dropped a k .... en mil is definitely not same as 1
m!<br>
typed too quickly and sent same.<br>
thanks for the correction!<br>
<br>
<br>
Museumbitch wrote:
<blockquote
 cite=" snipped-for-privacy@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com"
 type="cite">
  <pre wrap="">klh skrev:


  </pre>
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    <pre wrap="">Miles? I thought all the EU countries had gone metric and the
roads are
in km
[except Sweden, which has swedish miles, written svenska mil = 10m!
    </pre>
  </blockquote>
  <pre wrap=""><!---->
No, one Swedish mil = 10 KILOMETERS, not meters. Someone could get very
lost!!! :-)

God Jul och Gott Nytt &Aring;r from Sweden!!!

Erin

  </pre>
</blockquote>
</body>
</html>

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Re: Sewing new tweeds
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Try this variant of pressing then... turn the steam on your iron off.
Get something you can use for a dabber... a piece of sponge, a rolled up
strip of wool, a paintbrush.  Dab the seamline with water, let it soak in
for a few seconds, and then press it dry.  Clap the seam, and let it cool
before moving.  Too much steam and then not redrying the fabric before
moving it can give some waviness to fabric adjoining the seam line --
dabbing just the portion being pressed helps quite a bit.  And I prefer
to use a presscloth on wool blends.

If you have problems with two pieces coming out at different lengths
when you sew, I highly recommend getting hold of one of Margaret Islander's
videos, and watching how she uses her hand position to control the feed
of the fabric and gets it to come out even.  The video she spends most
time with this technique is, I believe, "Industrial Shortcuts", and you
can probably borrow it on interlibrary loan -- but I think she goes over
the basics of "pinless sewing" on every video I've seen.  Very useful
technique.
https://islandersewing.hostasaurus.com/Islander2005/prod-detail.php?pr_id=301


Re: OT Islander Sewing System

(snipped for lenght)
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Hi Kay,

You raised a timely suggest for me.  I've been thinking about buying the
Islander 4 DVD set and was wondering if I should get the Industrial
Shortcuts too. Are you happy with the system? Do you use the instructions
often?

Liz W



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