Sewing new tweeds - Page 2

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Re: OT Islander Sewing System
Dear Liz

I have used variations of the Islander System for years.  She is my
hero.  And Sharon,  I'm nuttier than a fruitcake; I sew in both
directions, and NEVER have uneven or bumpy or wavy seams.  I taught
hundreds of students to sew in the same way.  If the two pieces being
sewn together are held at the very end throughout the seam, with
frequent stops and lifting of the pieces from the bed of the machine,
they ALWAYS come out even, even if there is a bias piece that has five
inches to ease.  There are many different ways to accomplish the same
end, and in my book, if the technique works, it's right.

Teri


Re: OT Islander Sewing System

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Teri,

    After you responded to my message that the three little words "ease in
fullness" strike terror in my heart, I followed the advice you reiterated in
this thread.  It works!  I still might find a full five inches somewhat
daunting but it works with such smaller bits as sleeves.  Thanks for the
lesson.

Max



Re: OT Islander Sewing System

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LOL!!!!!  Teri, you're a gem.  ;)

and NEVER have uneven or bumpy or wavy seams.  I taught
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Sewing from the top to the bottom has never really been a wavy seam issue
for me.  It's an alignment issue.  Especially in flat garment construction.
Everything that needs to be Precisely aligned is almost always at the top.
So it makes a whole lot more sense to me to start there and work the way
down.  As far as getting things to come out the same length, I agree with
you.  However, the other thing that has to be stressed (here where so many
different skill levels read the group) is to always measure the pattern
pieces and make sure they are the same length.  I have found fronts and
backs off by as much as 1" numerous times in commercial patterns.  It's very
easy, even for those of us who know better, to get in a hurry and not check
that measurement, just hit the really important ones...bust, hip, etc.  And
sometimes even though you can ease the difference in, you shouldn't.
Sometimes it just needs to be corrected so that they are the same length to
start with.  Then held carefully so they stay that way while stitching.


There are many different ways to accomplish the same
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Yep.  I agree completely.  The trick is in finding the technique that fits
each person.

Sharon

--
Never try to teach a pig to sing.  It's a waste of time and just annoys the
pig.



Re: OT Islander Sewing System
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At least order it on interlibrary loan.  It's a sane method of sewing,
and a lot of things that home sewing instructions send you all around Robin
Hood's barn to do, can be done so much more easily and straightforwardly,
and with good result.

Had I been taught to sew this way, I undoubtedly would have enjoyed it much,
much more over the years.  

Kay


Re: Sewing new tweeds

Thanks for your help.

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I shall have to try this next time.

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Has she written any books?  I prefer to learn that way as I don't have
a video player.

Come to  think of it there was a Threads article about pinless sewing
in one of their mags or books. I must have a look.

Thanks again


Susan
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Re: Sewing new tweeds
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Sorry to follow my own post - I found the article :)

It's in the Threads book  "Beyond the Pattern" and is by Carol Adney.
Having glanced at it quickly, it seems to use the technique Teri talks
about of making sure the ends of the seam are held together.

How do you manage to do this with very long seams? My arms aren't very
long :))

Susan
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Re: Sewing new tweeds
Dear Susan,

For very long seams, you  can notch the two pieces before you begin
sewing, and hold it together at the notches until it's of a length that
you can manage.

I remember that article.  I had been doing that for years before it was
prescribed in Threads.  Whenever you seen the term "ease in fullness,"
one of the pieces i.e. sleeves, is going to be larger than the other.
Put the larger piece (sleeve) next to the machine, and it will ease
itself in.

Teri


Re: Sewing new tweeds
Hi Teri


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How do you manage to do that without stretching the fabric?
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Sounds like magic !! Do you use no pins then and the machine does it
itself?

Thanks

Susan

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Re: Sewing new tweeds

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There's one; it's gotten very mixed reviews.  The Threads article by Jeffry
Diduch in #87 would probably be your easiest access to the fabric handling
method, or probably anyone who's sewn in a factory.


Re: Sewing new tweeds

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Thanks - I'll see if I can get hold of that.

Susan
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