STM sewing

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Since some of the lurkers must be feeling intimidated by all the
faster-than-light sewing that's been going on around here, I thought
I'd post an account of my slower-than-molasses sewing.  

Unfortunately, I write slower than molasses too.  That shouldn't be
too bad in May -- but I keep my molasses in the refrigerator.  

At least it's not in the freezer.  

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I bought unbleached "russia drill" to make new summer jeans some time
ago, but a while back on another forum, a professional shirtmaker
posted that she always washed hemp hot and dried it hot at least three
times -- and that was shirt-weight hemp.  

Eh, having consulted my diary to find out the dates, it's easier to
quote than to summarize:  

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19 April 2008

I was going to start cutting my new hemp jeans Thursday, but
I read a complaint on Creative Machine that a hemp shirt had
kept shrinking every wash, and the guest host (It's shirt
week, and a professional shirtmaker is hosting) replied that
she always washed hot and dried hot three times before
cutting hemp.  I'd washed my Russia Drill only once, so I
popped it into the washer to soak overnight -- with real
soap, since I'd used detergent last time, and because the
soap chips were piling up.

Then I forgot to finish washing it yesterday.  Rinsed it in
hot water and ammonia this morning, and now it's in its
second hot rinse.
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Somewhere along the line, I drew threads to straighten the ends.  This
was unsettlingly easy -- it showed that the threads are strong, but it
also proved that they aren't packed very tight.  I like a nice firm
weave for making jeans.   After that I sorted out the pattern, which
had been hanging on a nail, and put it with the fabric.

Last Tuesday I opened my dining table to its full extent, laid out the
fabric, and cut along the drawn lines.  Used my smaller rotary cutter
and smaller mat for this, but my old Case bent-handle trimmers proved
more appropriate for cutting two layers of heavy twill.  

My piece of drill was three yards long -- well, it says three yards on
the invoice; I didn't measure it -- and just a tad under sixty inches
wide.  Just enough to make two pairs of jeans, with the front of one
pair and the back of another pair interlocked at each end and the
small pieces in the middle.  Couldn't quite figure out how to get a
strip long enough to make the back waistband, but decided to worry
about waistbands later.  

Next problem:  my dining table opens to only two and a half yards.
Putting the gate-leg table at the end stopped the fabric from
drooping, but didn't make it flat enough to lay out and cut.  

The layout crosswise was tight -- it was "I'm going to trim that
corner off the seam allowance anyway" tight -- but the layout
lengthwise was loose enough that it was quite safe to cut a back and a
front off one end, then pull the rest of the fabric onto the table and
finish the job.  

Having decided that, it was time to eat lunch and take a nap. Luckily,
DH is in the habit of taking his lunch into his room, so I could leave
all the stuff on the table.  


4 May 2008  

At which point in the narrative, I took another nap,  or had to cook
or something.

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That afternoon, I overslept and had just two hours before time to
clear off the table and put food on it.  

Drew arrows down a selvage with a wash-out marker, cut out one front
and one back, drawing more arrows on the pieces and the cutaways so
that I'd know which pieces belonged together.  (I like to sew with the
nap even when there isn't any, on the off chance that some subtle
difference will show up when you've sewn it together and put it on.)

The marker was in hand, so I used it to mark all the notches -- easy,
because repeated use of a tracing wheel had turned each notch into a
slit.  Then I stuck a pin into each mark and used it as a guide to
mark the other layer.  

Then I stuck the marker through the tailor's-tack holes and twisted
it:  voila!   Hip-pocket placement marked!  But how to mark the other
layer?   Stick a pin so it takes a nip on each side of the mark, then
stick another one at right angles to it.  Flip over, X marks the spot.
I have marked the wrong sides, and I need the marks on the right side.
I'll deal with that when it's time to sew the pockets on.

Front and back cut and marked and carried to the ironing board.   Pull
fabric onto the table, check layout -- plenty of room for twelve
pockets, but I *still* don't see where I'm going to get the
waistbands.   Cut and mark another front and back, carry to ironing
board, carry remaining fabric, tools, etc. to ironing board, close
table -- remaining fabric will fit on eating-size table -- start
making salad.  

Wednesday I boiled a piece of muslin destined to be passport pockets.

Thursday, put fabric etc. back on the table -- now it is plenty big
just by raising the other leaf -- use template to tear out two
passport pockets.  The muslin has a good tuck selvage, as if intended
for making sheets (even though it's *way* too coarse), so I use that
as the top hem of the pockets.   Pin template to pockets, lay on top
of fronts and backs, put muslin back on shelf.  

Study remaining piece of russia drill.  There is just no way to get
the waistbands out of this without a seam in the back.    Oh, well,
said the fox, this stuff is too thick and soft to make a waistband
anyway.  I've got a whole roll of that coarse muslin, and it's about
the right color.  (Well, it was before I boiled the dirt out of it.)  

Jumping ahead of the story:  as days passed, I grew more and more
unhappy with the idea of putting a cotton waistband on hemp jeans.
Linen would work better, but all my pieces of linen are either
bleach-white or bright colors.  But, while typing the first
installment of this saga, I remembered buying two yards of cannabis
canvas and then deciding that I didn't want a canvas poncho shirt
after all.   Most of it is still here, and (great shock!) I remembered
where I put it.  Probably weighs more per square yard than the drill,
but it's thinner -- and *much* firmer.  This will make excellent
waistbands.

Meanwhile, back at the narrative.   I started laying out four each of
the broadfall pockets, hip pockets, and watch pockets, two with arrows
pointing this way and two with arrows pointing that way:  well, duh!
Not to mention awk scrickle.  Bring back the muslin and the template,
tear out two more passport pockets.  There was only enough selvage
left for one more pocket, so I tore a pocket-wide strip with selvage
at one end, then tore a pocket off the selvage end and left the rest
to be hemmed down to the same length.

I cut the broadfall pockets by patterns (I'd long since made a second
copy of the patterns for these pants), cut the watch pockets by drawn
threads, cut the hip pockets half-and-half; they are rectangles with
one pointy end.  I drew the pointy ends on at least three of them with
wash-out marker, to save pinning the pattern/template to the fabric.
Didn't fold in half to check symmetry, as recently discussed on
Creative Machine.  I may when it's pressing time.  

I wrote "Hemp May 2008" on each pattern piece that I used even though
I started this job in April.

Friday I made birthday cake.    And blueberry muffins.  

Saturday the Farmers' Market opened for the season -- I bought a dozen
eggs and a tomato plant -- and there was a party at Chimps Comics (I
found a Dark Horse title I hadn't seen before).  Saturday may also be
the day I started writing this.  

And today was Sunday.   (I did plant the tomato I bought yesterday.)
Perhaps tomorrow I'll get on with hemming pockets and pressing edges,
but I've been known to take two years to finish a pair of pants.

Joy Beeson
--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/ -- sewing
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Re: STM sewing

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I know it's nothing to do with sewing, but why?

:-)
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Where do you get hemp fabric?

Mary



Re: STM sewing
Mary Fisher wrote:
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Maybe for the same reason  I keep honey, molasses and maple syrup in the
refrigerator. If I don't, I get ants all over my house. It doesn't
matter if I wash the jar after using it or if I put it in a plastic bag
after washing it, those little critters find the stuff. I may not have
an ant in the house, that I know of, but an open jar of anything sweet
draws them in.
Juno

Re: STM sewing
Juno wrote:
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In the "olde dayes" in South Florida, we kept the sugar bowl sitting in
a saucer of water for just that reason.  Restaurants did it in the times
before those individual packs of sugar that are ubiquitous now.  We had
no a/c -- Walgreen's did, and I think it boosted their business.  The
county office I worked in, the school I attended before that, certainly
had no a/c, nor did homes or cars.

Now, I put the cat food dishes for the feral cats in piepans with water
in them.  Someone made a suggestion of an alternative, but darned if I
can remember now what it was.
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: STM sewing

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I can understand that!

Thanks goodness we don't have an ant problem, yes, they're around but not to
that degree. It would be difficult for me, having (sealed) buckets of honey
as well as jars and containers of comb honey - to say nothing of jams.
Horror!

We were once camping in our Viking tent at a Dark Age village and found ants
crawling over our loaves and vegetables. To avoid this we had to put them in
a net and haul them over the ridge pole. No doubt ants would have found the
stuff had we been there longer but it was sufficient prevention for a few
days.

Mary



Re: STM sewing
Mary Fisher wrote:
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Whole cloves are a deterrent to ants.  They don't like them and will
avoid an area with them.  I drop a clove or two on the open shelves by
my sink.

--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: STM sewing
On Mon, 5 May 2008 19:52:50 +0100, "Mary Fisher"

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I've got one recipe that calls for a tablespoon of molasses, and I use
it every other year.  

And I think tomorrow is the day; I'd better check that there is
molasses in the refrigerator.  

(It's buckwheat pancakes.)  (And I have to start the batter the night
before, it turns out.  Good thing you made me look it up!)  


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I bought the fabric for my jeans from Wm. Booth, Draper:
http://www.wmboothdraper.com/Hemps/hemps_index.htm
(To get to the frame this page was displayed in, backspace to the
first slash.)

I didn't even look at my sewing today.  

Joy Beeson
--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/ -- sewing
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Re: STM sewing

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LOL!
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Glad to have been of service :-)

My next question also has nothing to do with sewing but if you could give me
the recipe for cuckwheat pancakes I'd appreciate it - you could mail it.


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Ah, not in my part of the world then ... Interestingly it said ,'at the sign
of the unicorn' but I couldn't see a horn ...
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Nor did I, too buy gardening.

Mary



Re: STM sewing
Mary Fisher wrote:
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Silly Mary!  Only virgins can see unicorns.  ;-)
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: STM sewing

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Oh, of course! Sorry, I forgot.

Haven't been a virgin for over fifty years ... is that the cause of my
failing memory I wonder ...

:-)

Mary



Re: STM sewing
Mary Fisher wrote:
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Failing?  Or selective?  It always amazed me to discover the differences
in my memories and those of my mother - of the same event.
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: STM sewing

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Yes, but my mother wasn't a virgin either in all the time I knew her :-)

It is interesting, my mother wrote her life story and instructed my brother
to give it to me 'on her demise'. He hasn't but that's another matter. She
told me, "You won't like it - but it's all true".

:-)

Mary
not lookong for unicorns any more




Re: STM sewing
Mary Fisher wrote:
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Truth can vary, depending on where one was standing.  ;-)

--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.com
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Re: STM sewing


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Quite :-))))))))))

Mary
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Re: STM sewing
Pogonip wrote:

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Whaaaaat???!!!  You mean there is no "absolute truth"?  Oh,
I'm so disillusioned. ;->

Beverly



Re: STM sewing

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Our lives are wrecked :-(

I think I'll go and have myself whipped ...

:-)))

Mary
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Re: OT: STM sewing

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to say "there is no absolute truth"  sounds like an absolute
truth ?
but unfortuneately it is  a self-condradicting truth  :)

robb


Re: OT: STM sewing

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Wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaagggggggggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

:-((((((((((((((

That's like being a success at being a failure ....

Mary



Re: STM sewing
On Tue, 6 May 2008 10:16:46 +0100, "Mary Fisher"

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Or post it on my live journal, in case one of the lurkers is also
interested.

http://laetitia-apis.livejournal.com/8291.html

Which reminds me that one of the people on rec.arts.sf.composition
doesn't have Internet access, and therefore doesn't have Web access,
so it's possible that someone reading this can't read a Web page.
Contact me somehow and I'll send the recipe back by the same method.
(Or you could look it up in Betty Crocker.  1961 edition.)

For those reading this through the keyhole of a Web portal:  Usenet is
no more part of the Internet than the U.S. Postal Service is part of
the railroad system.  Of course, we have the equivalent of a railroad
system with a spur line into every living room, into every *pocket*
even, so there isn't a lot of Usenet that goes by truck  or pony
express these days.  Still a good bit that goes by sneakernet, though.
There will always be data that goes by sneakernet, long after the
station wagon filled with data crystals no longer has the widest
bandwidth.  

Joy Beeson
--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/ -- sewing
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: STM sewing

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And of course I meant Buckwheat ... sorry

Mary



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