taking all the fabric off the bolt

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 is much easier than putting it back on.  I think
 I need to beg for an un-bent empty bolt.

Re: taking all the fabric off the bolt
cycjec wrote:
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Try pressing 10m of 90" wide freshly boiled and dried cotton and then
getting THAT back on the roll...  I gave up and folded it!  ;)

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: taking all the fabric off the bolt
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  has anyone ever done this?

Re: taking all the fabric off the bolt






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Yes, and am here to tell you won't do it again EVER.  In fact got so fed
up after only half way through actually PAID to have the fabric (a bolt
of cotton canvas that was going to pre-wash then put back onto bolt),
sent to a fabric pre-washing service (yes, such things exist), to do the
job.

Fabric pre-washing services put the blot/roll of fabric on one end, send
the material though a tunnel type washing/drying machine for
laundering/drying then rewind said material at the other end. This is
how showrooms, designers, commercial sewing, etc deal with
pre-shrinking/laundering large amounts of fabric.

Putting lengths of fabric onto a bolt or roller is not as easy as one
thinks. Material has to be kept under the right amount of tension and
guided properly otherwise after only a few meters it begins to swivel
off centre and so forth.

Candide



Re: taking all the fabric off the bolt
wrote:

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Not to mention all the mysterious wrinkles that become pressed-in
creases.  Fortunately, the only thing I have a roll of at the moment
is unbleached muslin, and I dealt with that by tearing off exactly one
yard, washing it thoroughly -- overnight soak in soapy water etc. etc.
-- drying in the dryer, then I re-measured it and pinned a note to the
bolt so that I can tear off a piece that will be the right size after
it's washed.  This also keeps loom-state fabric available in case I
want to make something that's *supposed* to shrink.  

I made a pair of pillowcases from the swatch.  The muslin is a bit too
coarse for the soft pillows, but not quite coarse enough to label the
hard pillows.  

Joy Beeson
--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/ -- needlework
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Re: taking all the fabric off the bolt

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one
and
swivel

Thank you for reminding me about pillowslips. Have two very nice bolts
of vintage Irish linen of about 10 yards each for the project. Only plan
to use one of my treasured bolts, the other will go into the stash for
future. The way I get round to things, one or both bolts will end up
being sold off as part of my estate once I'm gone. That's how they came
to me in the first place! *LOL*






Re: taking all the fabric off the bolt

cycjec wrote:
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---
    Bolts are handy to have. Useul for all sorts of things, from RIP
halloween decor, to actually rolling fabric on, to fireplace starters.
   Snot so bad, rolling fabric back onto bolts. You get better with
practice.
   Somebody SPANK me, please! I went into the Evil Realm of Retailing (
ie, Wal Mart),  where I seldom ever tread, and came out with 8 yards of
seriously beautiful bridal satin, sky blue, for $1.00 US per yard. I
visualize an outfit for the blue-eyed GBebe. Can't remember the mfg.,
but it was one of those well-known, expensive companies.
   Maybe I should have bought the whole bolt.... $1.00 a yard...what to
do, what to do...
                                                                Cea


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