how to finish off

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hello new to sewing ,how do i finish of a line once iv finished it so it
doesnt undo on a sewing machine ,thanks ,i hope that makes sence to
sombody please help .

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Re: how to finish off
littlemiss wrote:
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Yes, makes perfect sense.  :)

There are several ways of finishing a seam end, but whether you bother
or not depends on what will happen to the seam next...

If another seam will cross it or it's likely to be trimmed off, I don't
bother to finish it at all.  There's no point!  Same if it'll be hidden
inside a full lining or a hem.

For a seam that needs to be neatly finished, I generally reverse the
stitching: press the reverse button and sew backwards for 4-5 stitches.

If it's a very fine fabric, you can knot the threads and clip them close
to the stitching.

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: how to finish off
littlemiss had written this in response to
http://www.sewgirls.com/textiles/how-to-finish-off-3040-.htm  :


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littlemiss wrote:


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aww thank you ever so much xxx





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Re: how to finish off
On 10 Aug 2007 08:10:44 GMT, nicky2732_at_hotmail_dot_ snipped-for-privacy@foo.com
(littlemiss) wrote:

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As has been mentioned, most of the time you do nothing at all.  

There are dozens of ways to secure the end of a line of stitching.  

Stitching backward is the one I like the least, but there are times
when it's useful.  

More often, simply shortening the stitches at the beginning and end of
the seam will do the trick.  But beware, a too-short stitch will
weaken the fabric, and in no case should you use a stitch shorter than
the width of two threads of the fabric, and to get it that short, you
need to sew by hand to be sure of slipping the needle between the
threads instead of piercing them.  (Well, except for agricultural
burlap, but there you are securing individual fibers of jute, so
piercing every thread may not weaken the seam.)

When the edge was hemmed before the seam was sewn, a bar tack will
stop it from ripping.  A hand-stitched bar tack is usually easier and
more secure than a machine-stitched bar tack, but when you are
zig-zagging -- as when sewing on a patch pocket -- the bar tack can be
made in one stroke with the sewing.  You can lower the feed dogs for
the first few stitches, or begin stitching at stitch-length zero, or
turn the handwheel while flipping from forward to reverse after each
stitch is done, or whatever is convenient on your machine.  There may
be something automatic that's meant for buttonholes.

When sewing a dart, I knot the thread and tighten the knot around a
pin stuck into the point of the dart to make it snug up against the
fabric, then trim the ends to about half an inch.   (Details at
http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/RUFFTEXT/ROUGH033.TXT )

When you are being really, really fussy, leave the ends long, thread
them into a hand-sewing needle and weave them back into the seam, or
use any of the methods for ending a line of hand stitches.  

If you decide you want to weave the threads back after you've already
cut them, use a fine crochet hook, or put the needle into the fabric
before threading it.

Joy Beeson
--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/ -- sewing
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