PHOTO OF THE WEEK, Tailored Vest - Page 2

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Re: OT: Sausage (was tailored vest)
Hejsan!

Melinda Meahan - take out TRASH to send skrev:


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Have you tried Finnish Makkara (sausage)? My stomach has the same
sensitivities as Melinda's and Kate's and I can eat makkara. It's
mostly just lean pork and a few spices; there is a variety that comes
with bits of cheese embedded in the makkara. I don't know if there
might be any specialty grocers near where you live, but this is well
worth looking for!!! :-)

Erin
http://www.livejournal.com/~arkivarie /
(yes! I finally added something! :-) )


Re: PHOTO OF THE WEEK, Tailored Vest
Jack Schmidling wrote:
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You heat set it onto specially prepared fabric.  Doesn't run, but it can
fade...

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: PHOTO OF THE WEEK, Tailored Vest


Kate Dicey wrote:

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I use the alphabet on DWs viking machine [platinum 770] and make them on
matching fabric or ribbon. has swedish alphabet also i can write 'woven
by' or 'vävade av'. While the  viking can do swedish words it doesn't
check for spelling or grammar, which the above needs!

klh in VA

Re: PHOTO OF THE WEEK, Tailored Vest
snipped-for-privacy@schmidling.com wrote:
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Jack,

It looks fabulous!

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So what went wrong? It may have been the difference in stretchiness in
your materials - sometimes lining stretches like nobodies business......

Sarah

Re: PHOTO OF THE WEEK, Tailored Vest
Sarah Dale wrote:

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First of all, the narrow flap that goes around the back to make the neck
line did not lie properly and I had to futz with the shape till it did.

The main problems were in getting the front and back shoulder seams to
meet at the correct angle, join neatly at the edge and not cause rumples
in the back.  Again, the shape of the draft was not correct and I had to
do a lot of fudging, basting and rebasting.

I got most of the bugs out with the army blanket "muslin" but some of
them didn't translate well to the back material.

Other than that, just a lot of work but it's fun work.. the other stuff
is frustrating.

js



--
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: http://schmidling.com/pow.htm
Astronomy, Beer, Cheese, Fiber,Gems, Sausage,Silver http://schmidling.com

Re: PHOTO OF THE WEEK, Tailored Vest
Jack Schmidling wrote:
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This is where pressing and steaming to shape the piece using a tailors
ham come in.
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I must admit, I've never seen a vest with that construction at the back
previously! All the ones here in the UK (called waistcoats) that I have
seen have the complete back made out of either the same fabric as the
front or an alternative slippery material - they don't have this neck
band. I can certainly see why you had problems - it doesn't look like a
pattern construction I'd want to tackle (but then I'm still learning
myself....). Maybe you should try a different pattern for the next one?
I've turned out a couple of vests with solid backs for my DD and DB and
they've come out without any problems in the neck / shoulder area.
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That could be another thing that might not have helped - did you use
army blanket as the "muslin" for the main back piece? In which case the
alterations wouldn't have been quite right as it wouldn't have behaved
like your actual material. Your "muslin" needs to be similar to the type
of material to be used - so if the back is a slippery soft material,
then your practice piece needs to be similar.

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I know how you feel - when I made my posh frock earlier this year, I
ended up making 2 muslins to get the fit right and still had a couple of
fiddly bits to tackle when I made the real thing!

I notice Kate has given you some excellent advice on how to deal
withyour vest back, so I shan't repeat it.

Enjoy the weaving and sewing - I'm looking forward to seeing what you do
next.

Sarah

Re: PHOTO OF THE WEEK, Tailored Vest
Dear Jack,

There is a book called Professional Patternmaking for Women's Wear and
Casual Menswear by Jack Handford.  I used it in the classroom for
years, and it was the basis for the instructions I wrote for
computer-aided design patternmaking.  Although most of the book is
devoted to women's wear, the instructions for menswear are among the
best that I have ever seen.  They're easy to follow, and once
perfected, will serve as the basis for all of your clothing.  You would
start with a shirt and pants draft, and then progress with your own
designs, using these drafts as templates.  There are suggestions in the
book for jackets, and you can follow the instructions for women's wear
to enlarge the templates for coats.

If you have a drawing program in your computer, you can make life-sized
patterns from the instructions in this book.

While I agree that a piece cut on the bias in hand-woven fabric seems
wasteful, you should be able to find a small piece cut from the sides
of the body pieces that would be large enough.  Say, the armhole
leftovers or the fronts above the buttonholes?  This "handle" feature
was present in almost all of the historic pieces I've observed, and I
think its purpose was so that the cheaper back fabric could not be seen
under a jacket.

Teri


Re: PHOTO OF THE WEEK, Tailored Vest
Sarah Dale wrote:

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Funny you should mention that.  I have two vests that I pondered while
doing this one and I never even noticed that one of them had no neck
band of fashion fabric.  Now that I look at this, it is obvious that
this would have been a much easier design for a beginner.

js

--
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: http://schmidling.com/pow.htm
Astronomy, Beer, Cheese, Fiber,Gems, Sausage,Silver http://schmidling.com

Re: PHOTO OF THE WEEK, Tailored Vest
snipped-for-privacy@schmidling.com wrote:
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Jack, you may have lost your hair over it, but the result is lovely.

What was it that didn't fit?  If we know, we can tailor our fitting
advice better...  :)

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: PHOTO OF THE WEEK, Tailored Vest
Kate Dicey wrote:

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I posted a picture of the left shoulder that pretty much says it all.
The right looks fine and if I scrunch around when putting it on the
problem goes away, more or less but it does not hang properly by itself.

http://schmidling.com/vestprob.jpg


js



--
PHOTO OF THE WEEK: http://schmidling.com/pow.htm
Astronomy, Beer, Cheese, Fiber,Gems, Sausage,Silver http://schmidling.com

Re: PHOTO OF THE WEEK, Tailored Vest
Jack Schmidling wrote:

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Hm...  Looks like the slipery lining/back fabric slid and grew in the
cutting process.  Best thing is to make sure right and left shoulders of
the FRONT are exactly the same, stay-stitch them, and then trim the
back, back lining, and front lining to match.  Forget, at this point,
that they may no longer fit the pattern you drafted, or match the shape
of the toile.  What they need to do is fit YOU and each other!

Another thing I like to do when making a waistcoat from a heavy fabric
is make the back weigh as much as the front, so the weight of the front
doean't pull at the neck and shoulders when it's being worn.  This can
be done by using a heavier weight of back fabric and interlining the
back with something like hair canvass.  If this isn't quite enough, but
you don't want to add more bulk, then you add weights!  Literally!
pennies are good, as are tap washers, curtain weights, whatever.  Coco
Chanel used to weight the backs of jackets with chain stitched to the
interlining just above the hem.  With the chain, just gently catch
stitch it to the interlining on the body side.  With the pennies and so
forth, make up little bags of cotton or lining fabric and catch stitch
them to the interlining...  Pennies are flatter than chain and will be
more comfortable than chain for leaning against when wearing.

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

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