Re: LATE Sunday AM, etc, and a *wanted* "ad"....

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You know, I am prettyu sure that my tiny, tiny needles are stainless steel.
I really don't like working with them, and only use them when I absolutely
must.

Higs,
Katherine

snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:
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Re: LATE Sunday AM, etc, and a *wanted* "ad"....
Why? Angle of the tip? Tip too sharp?  Too slippery?  Do you have other
needles of the same size that you do like?  Maybe you just do not like
knitting tiny, tiny stitches  :  )

If the tip is too slippery ( and many commercial are) texture them with some
1000 grit emery paper.  That often helps.  Your fingers will not feel a
difference, but the yarn will.

Aaron

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steel.



Re: LATE Sunday AM, etc, and a *wanted* "ad"....
Too sharp and too slippery. I love knitting tiny, tiny stitches, but those
DPNs kill me! <g>

Higs,
Katherine

snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:
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Adapting the needles to the use, was Re: LATE Sunday AM, etc, and a *wanted* "ad"....
First, Katherine,
What do you consider to be tiny, tiny stitches?  These days I knit mostly in
the range of 28  to 48 stitches/ 4 inches. For example the gansey is 7.3 spi
on #1s with Fisherman's Wool, the sport weight is knitting at ~9 spi and the
cashmere at about 11.7.  My eyes are too old to go any finer.
-------
Well, I have used very fine emery paper to change the texture and sometimes
the shape of the tips of all of my commercial stainless steel knitting
needles. The first time, it was very hard to get up the nerve to take
sandpaper to those beautifully polished, and Oh! so precious new needles.
But, I liked them better after texturing.

In fact, whenever I take up a new style of yarn, I spend some time knitting
gauge swatches and running out to the shop to "adjust" the tips of my
needles to better suit that yarn.  If I think that I am going to really like
that yarn (i.e., it was on sale and I bought a lot LOL)  I make a new set of
needles and just dedicate them to that yarn.

With the steel rod about US$0.25/foot, each set of steel needles is not too
expensive -- even cheaper than brass.  The brass needles were pretty, quick
to make, easy to change the shape of  the points, and they knit very
smoothly.  But now, that I have learned to knit with a knitting sheath, I
find the steel DPN can knit just as smoothly and much faster due to the
spring action of the steel.  (Knit and learn!) Yesterday,  I made a hanger
for the bird feeder out of a set of brass knitting needles that I made last
December. By the time I have made all the steel DPN that I want, I expect to
have about 7 or 8 sets of  5 DPN. This will include at least 2 sets of 5 -
18 inch long US # 1 with different tip shapes for different yarns.

One of the great chefs of the world once told me that, "All a chef needs is
a fire, a sauté pan, and a knife.  Every thing else in the kitchen is just a
toy." Maybe I would actually do better knitting if I just settled on one
yarn and one set of needles. I guess, if all I had was wassit, (an early
commercial yarn)  I would only need one set of needles. Socks, underwear,
and ganseys, all from the same yarn, and off the same needles.

 Aaron



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Re: Adapting the needles to the use, was Re: LATE Sunday AM, etc, and a *wanted* "ad"....

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I would add 2 things - a lid and a big spoon.  (and something to
sharpen the knife with!  And for me, instead of a saute pan, I'd have
my large cast iron skillet.  But apart from these minor differences,
this is so true!

Alison

Re: Adapting the needles to the use, was Re: LATE Sunday AM, etc, and a *wanted* "ad"....
Sauté is a cooking method.  You can sauté in a cast iron skillet!  When you
do, it is a sauté pan!  And, you can bake a cake in it - so then it is a
cake pan.  In particular, pineapple upside down cake seems to do best in a
cast iron cake pan  :  )

Aaron


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is
just a



Re: Adapting the needles to the use, was Re: LATE Sunday AM, etc, and a *wanted* "ad"....

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OK with the iron skillet in the kitchen, I absolutly love (although my
wrists are getting to old for it) I would add my trench digger from WWII,
I bought in a army surpluse store, for the garden, best tool I ever had,
used it for the 50 years I lived in Canada.

Els

--
Ja for Jazz and cobra loose the rrrrrrrr

Re: Adapting the needles to the use, was Re: LATE Sunday AM, etc, and a *wanted* "ad"....
Q.  So how come we are not still using and content with those simple,
durable, multipurpose items?
A. My DW scrubs my cast iron with soap and abrasive until it sparkles, and
then complains when it leaves rust marks in the shelf :  )  She likes her
cooking pots clean.   So, I cook with Teflon, and the CI is packed away for
the day when I need it's simple virtues.

Aaron

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needs is
just a
one
early
underwear,



Re: Adapting the needles to the use, was Re: LATE Sunday AM, etc, and a *wanted* "ad"....

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Aaron, you really cook in Teflon.....methings that a bit of extra iron is
better than all those horrible chemicals from Teflon.  Go visit a Teflon
making factory.   Cast Iron, is washed in hot water and soap and given a
wipe with on old cloth with a bit of olive oil so it looks deep  black.
When I have baked pancase for instance, I just whipe the pan with a cloth
and put it away.  I have a Dutch oven, a large and small frying pan, and a
Dutch waffle iron and many other baking pans.  it conduct the heat
perfectly and fast.  Much better than those frilly Teflon pans. LOL  

Els
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--
Ja for Jazz and cobra loose the rrrrrrrr

Re: Adapting the needles to the use, was Re: LATE Sunday AM, etc, and a *wanted* "ad"....
(Els van Dam) wrote:
It should have read......Me thinks....Read on I made some
corrections...(terrible speller I am)
EvD

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--
Ja for Jazz and cobra loose the rrrrrrrr

OT: Will a cast iron pot survive the end of the world? Was Re: Adapting the need ...
A fellow across the Bay murdered his mother because she washed the seasoning
off of his cast iron pans.  I was on his side :  )

I have a cast iron pot that came across the Oregon Train in the 1860s by ox
drawn wagon, and it is still in perfect condition - but I do not keep it in
the kitchen.  I do not keep it any where my wife is likely to find it ...
and scrub it with harsh chemicals ;  )

I know about halogen chemistry, and the toxicology of Teflon cooking
implements.  I also know something about the chemistry of cast iron, what
the chemical nature of the black surface on cast iron is, and the toxicology
of cooking in cast iron.  Just because cast iron is a traditional material,
does not make it any safer than Teflon.  Sorry!  I know the risks and I do
not worry about either the risk from cast iron or the risk from Teflon.
Those risks are a thousand times less than the risk from an auto accident.
Those risks are a hundred times less than the risk of health problems from
the chemical plasticizers that we all now carry in our bodies.  And, if you
want to really worry; then worry about global warming.  It is coming a whole
lot faster than any of the computer models predict.  Those models assume
that ice behaves in a linear fashion, even as it approaches its melting
point.  However, ice gets very weak as it approaches it melting point.  The
computer models do not understand ice.  Ice sags and flows, and ends up
being fresh water in the sea.  Fresh water in the North Atlantic can change
the global currents for a few years. Europe and England could freeze - fast.
Here in California, the rains could fail leaving 20 million people without
water, or one really big storm could wash out our levees (a la Katrina) and
allow salt water into the water supplies that those 20 million people and
the crops that feed North America depend on.  Of course, one good earthquake
could knock those all those water supplies out in an instant, also!  And,
the Feds do not think that it is an emergency?  With issues like that, I do
not need to worry about Teflon or cast iron.

I just looked at the care sheet for our cook wear.  Turns out, it  has a
ceramic lining that feels like Teflon but does not have any halogens in it.
We call it Teflon, but its not. I'm sure it has its risks, but it is not bad
to cook on, but it sure does not invoke the passion of cast iron.  It is OK
for some things, but every so often, I have to sneak out my cast iron wok
for stir fry.

Aaron

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and
her
for
is
on
have
WWII,
had,



Re: OT: Will a cast iron pot survive the end of the world? Was Re: Adapting the need ...

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This sounds like my house.  I like my pans to be washed, husband likes
his cast iron to be wiped out with a paper towel and whatever else he
does with them, if anything.   The final straw was when I fixed myself
some eggs and they tasted like onions and peppers - and I wasn't in the
mood for my eggs to taste like onions and peppers.

I got myself a no stick skillet that nobody else can touch (daughter has
a way of "forgetting" how to care for them), and I don't touch any of
the cast iron skillets.

Marriage.  One big compromise :)

BB

Re: OT: Will a cast iron pot survive the end of the world? Was Re: Adapting the need ...
snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

   Just because cast iron is a traditional material,
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Personally, I cook mostly in ceramic or glass (Corning and Pyrex) and my
favorite skillet is stainless steel.  All of these go in the dishwasher
and usually come out both clean and contented.

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Re: OT: Will a cast iron pot survive the end of the world? Was Re: Adapting the need ...

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So we all have our favorite cooking pots and tools.  I have a steel (that
rusts) potato peeling knife.  It really is an old Herring "kaken" knife,
that was used by fishermen at sea to clean the herring.  The nice thing is
that it keeps its edge much longer than stainless steel, which have
alloides in them, so the steel will not rust (however that does not mean
that it will not stain though)  I clean it after use with a SOS.

Els

--
Ja for Jazz and cobra loose the rrrrrrrr

Re: OT: Will a cast iron pot survive the end of the world? Was Re: Adapting the need ...
On Wed, 14 Jun 2006 15:26:50 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@telus.net (Els van Dam)
wrote:

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I had a good iron knife when I was in the US. It also rusted, and
although it didn't keep its edge for very long, it was easy to sharpen
to a very fine edge. Once a friend of my daughter had a summer job
selling knives and I agreed to be her first "customer" so she could
practice her sales pitch. She was supposed to ask Mrs. Housewife to
bring out her best knife so she could demonstrate the superiority of
the brand she was selling. My old iron knife ran circles around her
fancy stainless steel knife. She was a bit worried, but I reassured
her that most of her customers wouldn't have such a knife.

I left that old knife in the US when I moved to Italy, and I'm really
sorry I did that.
--
Barbara Vaughan

My email address is my first initial followed by my last name at libero dot it.

Re: OT: Will a cast iron pot survive the end of the world? Was Re: Adapting the need ...

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Barbara, that makes me think of our trip to Chattanooga, to visit our son
who lives there.  We came down from Detroit through Ohio, Kentucky and
Tennessee.  We stopped in many road site places and because I forgot a
proper knife to slice the cheese and butter the bread for road side
picknicks, I bought a steel knife in one of the tourist stores along the
highway. I think it was a hickory brand one, and a steel one.  We I have
several of these, and I love them for the same reason.  It is not that
easy to get knives like that today.  

Els

--
Ja for Jazz and cobra loose the rrrrrrrr

Re: OT: Will a cast iron pot survive the end of the world? Was Re: Adapting the need ...

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Dear Sweet Aaron,

I am indeed concerned about global warming.  I do not worry about using my
cast Iron pots, but will not use Teflon, since I find it giving off an
unpleasant smell.  Since I am now 70, there is little I can do about most
of these things so I Pick my battles.  Usually only the ones I have some
controle ove, such as the use of castiron over Teflon.  My cast Iron pots
are all pitch black, and have always been that way. The odd time when
someone else does the dishes, and does not wipe the pot dry right away,
there may be a little bit of rust, but I clean that away with a bit of
oil, no sweat.  I think that your 18960 Oragon trail pot is a bit unhappy
sitting so pristene, far a way from the kitchen.  It would love to have
some cornbread with black beans to cook, or some nice homemade soup.  Poor
pot, made to be used.....

Els
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--
Ja for Jazz and cobra loose the rrrrrrrr

Re: OT: Will a cast iron pot survive the end of the world? Was Re: Adapting the need ...
I do not mind if my cast iron is washed.  The cast iron griddle gets wiped
after pancakes, but it gets washed with soap after it has cooked sausage.
But, My wife has been known to polish a cast iron skillet with abrasive
until it was bright silver all over (followed shortly there after by orange
rust.)  It is now back to being a deep black, but it took a while.

The nonstick black finish on cast iron is polymerized oils that adhere to
grains of carbon in the iron. The result is a porous film that holds
unpolymerized oil and other materials.  Meat juices can get into the oil
film where they are exposed to 400+ temperatures in the presence of  metals
(Na & Fe) that act as catalysts for the formation of heterocyclic amines
(HCAs) which can then show up in the food products.  This is pretty much
just like BBQ.  I still eat BBQ too.  Any kind of an acid material such as
tomato or pineapple can leach iron from CI in toxic amounts.  I still think
that my cast iron skillet makes the very best pineapple upside down cake, so
that is how I make it.  In short, the San Antonio Chili with meat and
tomatoes long simmered in a cast iron pot had better be really good, or it
is not worth the risk.

Global warming will cause the levels to gradually rise.  But, there are
other effects that may happen as fast as Hurricane Katrina. Most scientists
do not talk about these near term and potentially abrupt climate changes for
fear of being labeled "extremist", "alarmist" and losing their funding and
reputation.  I do not have any reputation or finding so I can say what the
data tells me.  The data tells me that abrupt climate changes on a scale of
5C over a period of 3 years  or rainfall changing be a factor of 3 in the
same period in some localities is a real possibility.  How large a
possibility?  Well, larger than the probability of my house burning down,
and I still have fire insurance.  My mortgage company insists.  So why don't
they insist that we do something about global warming which has both a
higher probability of happening and a larger impact?

Aaron




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Re: OT: Will a cast iron pot survive the end of the world? Was Re: Adapting the need ...
Dear friends,

The only thing I have to add to the topic of treatment of cast iron, is
after cleaning my skillets or Dutch oven, (either with plain water, or
with soap and water when needed, I always put them on the range using a
medium low heat to dry them completely.

I have 3 pieces, 2 very old, and 1 I seasoned myself, and all are in
perfect condition.  They rarely need re-seasoning (once in 5 or 10
years) and they work beautifully.

Hesira

Who loves her pots and pans!


Re: OT: Will a cast iron pot survive the end of the world? Was Re: Adapting the need ...
snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:
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Jeepers, have you TALKED to her about this obsessive-compulsive
behaviour?? :-) :-) No way I would polish anything that doesn't need it,
I have more productive things to do with my time (like maybe sit with my
feet up reading a novel?)

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


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