OT: Euro Pro Steam Irons

I was at a quilt show last weekend and a demonstrator was there selling the
Euro Pro Steam Iron. The website is:
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I would love to hear from those who have purchased this and what pros and cons they have. I can get it for $200 if I order it this week. Thanks for your input. Bunny
Reply to
Hobot
According to the web site, the regular price of the iron is $300, and they'll throw in shipping and an instruction DVD "for free". That must be a heck of an iron to justify such a price! To purchase just the DVD is $19.95. I own a regular size and weight GE steam iron and a light weight Black and Decker steam iron, each of which I paid less that $30 for, and they both work beautifully. A couple of years ago I accidentally dropped an iron and it never worked again, but as disgusted as I was at myself for killing an iron, I would be devastated if I dropped such an expensive iron! Frankly, I can't imagine an iron to be used in a home costing what they charge or justifying such a price! And remember that at the moment, the exchange rate between dollars and Euros is such extremely poor from the dollar side.
Reply to
Mary
I purchased one of these a couple of years ago after seeing it demo'd at both a home show and quilt show. I really like it - generates LOTS of steam (I know - not SUPPOSED to use steam quilting - but there's no quilt police, right?). Not sure that I like it dry but then, I really don't like ANY dry irons. I'm also one of these wacko people that when going 'out' (work, dinner, etc.) I must be ironed! I iron my work clothes every AM before dressing. I make DH crazy when we're going out somewhere. I have also dropped it a a couple of times - cracked the housing even - and it still works. Do keep in mind you MUST use distilled water - NOT TAP WATER!
Kim in NJ
Reply to
AuntK
Just a small suggestion on the Euro Pro. *Before* I bought one, I'd want to see the operating / care instructions. I am very fond of the Rowenta irons that were made in Germany about 3 years ago. Haven't heard anyone pleased with Rowenta's newest iron. The older Rowenta does demand soaking and flushing. The time it takes is well worth it (to me). Wonder what Euro Pro requires? You will want to know. Recently, a neighbor came over. Quite angry. She said, "Pardon me, but I need an iron that's not a sissy". She filled my Rowenta and pressed a quilt top she'd just made. The quilt top was, indeed, a sorry sight with the seams sort of leaning to the side but certainly not pressed flat and pretty like the Rowenta can do. Yesterday, after I'd only hoped she would for 20 years, my DDIL asked me to teach her to quilt. Ah yes. When I showed her how to press her seams and blocks, she said, "My golly, what an iron!". I'm thinking I'll start checking the thrift stores for abandoned older Rowentas. I'm betting there will be one or two whose owner didn't read the manual or didn't want to be bothered. I'll close this with something I read yesterday. Some times you just have to take the bull by the horns and make lemonade. Polly
Reply to
Polly Esther
I'm the poster who probably whines and gripes about irons the most. After the leaky Rowenta saga I'm back using the circa 1973 Sears iron. If I can make a suggestion, I think I'd make sure they have a liberal return policy. That way you can be comfortable spending that kind of money to assure you LOVE your new iron. Here's my plan. (I envy your choice, I just can't afford it)....I'm going to Wal Mart, the store I love to hate, and starting with the Shark, gonna work my way down to the Black and Decker. The ONE thing nice I can say about Wal Mart is, it's very easy to return a product you don't like.
Sherry
Reply to
Sherry
It can be done Polly. I have a Rowenta that came from the thrift store. It is not one of the really expensive ones but is older. In the meantime you might find some other fun stuff while you are on the hunt! There are a couple of older little travel irons that get really hot and are good for using while piecing. You might watch for those too. Taria
Reply to
Taria
Travel irons? Are they lightweight? Are they good for the quick LIL seams? How big are they? What am I looking for?
Butterfly (Not ALL hotels have irons for the last pesky wrinkle from the suitcase)
Reply to
Butterflywings
Hello!
Why are you not supposed to do steam ironing? Good thing there are no quilt police - I'd have been busted - no one told me! :)
Steph
I really like it - generates LOTS
Reply to
Steph
I use a travel iron for my 'beside my sewing, ironing as I piece' iron. It is just fine. . In message , Butterflywings writes >Travel irons? Are they lightweight? Are they good for the quick LIL seams? >How big are they? >What am I looking for? > >Butterfly (Not ALL hotels have irons for the last pesky wrinkle from the >suitcase)
Reply to
Patti
I compromise, Steph! As I go along, I press with a dry iron. When I'm sure all is as right as it's going to get, I will use steam. I fear doing a virtually permanent press that would show up if I had to re-do something. Dry pressing creases can be removed by steam pressing. . In message , Steph writes >Hello! > >Why are you not supposed to do steam ironing? Good thing there are no >quilt police - I'd have been busted - no one told me! :) > >Steph
Reply to
Patti
Steph, that's a never to be resolved issue here. Well, not really an 'issue'. Some of us do, some of us don't. I wouldn't if I were creating with strange triangles or diamond shapes; the steam could cause a warp that would give you a nasty surprise in the final outcome. I'm a steamer. Suit yourself. Polly
"Steph" Why are you not supposed to do steam ironing? Good thing there are no
Reply to
Polly Esther
Ah - thank you Polly and Patti! I didn't know that steam could warp or remove dry pressed seams. Very useful info!!
Reply to
Steph
I have a Euro-pro Steam Generator Iron and it really puts out the steam. While not the exact model you mentioned, I think it beats the pants off of any currently offered Rowenta made. I would buy another Euro-Pro in a minute.
John
Reply to
John
Small and lightweight. I like the old GE ones. They get hot and are handy to have. HEre is one on Ebay #220210843558
Several guild friends have the new Rowenta travel irons and like them a lot. I don't know about those personally.
HTH, Taria
Reply to
Taria
I have one---it's nice, but doesn't get quite hot enough. So I got a T- Fal Ultraglide (recommended in a QU class) & love it :-)
Reply to
Neeji
I have one of the new Rowenta travel irons. I bought it for taking to retreats and classes. I have only used it once, but it seemed to work well.
Julia in MN
Reply to
Julia in MN
I haven't visited the website yet, but I can't imagine why you would need an instructional video for an iron.
Linda PATCHogue, NY
On Thu, 13 Mar 2008 05:41:30 -0700 (PDT), Mary wrote:
Linda PATCHogue, NY
Reply to
WitchyStitcher
And if you ever take a class from Sharon Schaumber, that's the only iron she recommends for her method. The others don't get hot enough.
Reply to
KJ

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