OT: how to remove blue pen ink from polyester and nylon fabric ?

You don't say what kind of ink. If it's ball-point pen ink, try Spray or sponge with drycleaning solvent (perchloroethylene, trichloroethylene) then rub with heavy-duty liquid detergent before washing.
That's from
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which looks like a good reference site.The TOC is at
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Reply to
Pogonip
I have called the Ag Extension office of the State Department of Agriculture to ask a home economist how to deal with problems, too. They have lots of free and inexpensive publications, too, if I get to their office. They do some trades with other states, and with federal publications, many of which are useful.
Reply to
Pogonip
I've been known to forget a pen in my pocket a time or two and had the great fun of washing it. That's why I keep a bottle of hairspray in my laundering room. Works great on polyester. oldhag
Reply to
oldhag
And fabric dye, especially on cotton.
Go ahead, ask me what became of my favorite aqua colored cotton dress after my dog accessorized it with muddy paw prints and I tried to use dishwasher detergent to get them out (thanks ever so much "Heloise").
Can you say "cleaning rags"?
Always test on an inconspicous spot like the inside of the hem. On the other hand, if the garment is clearly unwearable in its current state and you've tried everything else, go for it. What do you have to lose?
Reply to
Kathleen
I was going to mention that one too. What I have noticed re: using hairspray you need to keep 2 things in mind for best results. 1. It needs to be aerosol. Dunno why just seems to work a lot better. 2. it needs to be the CHEAP stuff. Aquanet works great. NAYY.
Sharon
Reply to
Sharon Hays
Not according to the fine folks at Ohio State U:
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, then again, if it works for you go for it. Beverly
Reply to
BEI Design
I use cheap hairspray in the aerosol can on black widow spiders I find inside the house or on my back porch. They can have the whole yard, that's ok. I like the hairspray because it does kill the insect, yet doesn't leave a poisonous residue that might hurt the cats.
Reply to
Pogonip
I keep a can of AquaNet in the laundry room, too. It does do wonders for ink stains and I think it's the combination of alcohol and acetone that does the job.
Several years ago here at work they furnished with a liquid, quite watery, red in color ink remover. It was called Ditto Soap and was amazing on ink stains on clothes and hands. I haven't been able to locate it in years.
Reply to
itsjoannotjoann
A paste of OxyClean and water - BUT try it on an inconspicuous area first, it may (or may not) lighten the fabric's color too.
Reply to
Sparafucile
It could be that we have a different `kind` of dishwashing cream , i have used it [the kinds sold here !!!] on many kinds of clothes , never had any thing `loose colors`,,,,,, For Doing that i USE Chlorine !!!!! and sometimes hanging to dry in the sun right side up !!!! why waste good materails for that when the sun does it for free !!!:>:>:>:>
I have had marks that wouldn`t go away , once settled in a cloth, than i had to decide whether i should cover them [ embroidery ? patch ? pocket ? ,, or change the whole clotth into something else ,,,, there are so many options :>:>:>:> mirjam
Reply to
mirjam
On Aug 1, 9:03=A0pm, "BEI Design" wrote:
In cleaning Stains and using water , it might be that the difference in water [ more floutide , calcium etc!!!] also plays a role in hou the detergent works !!! mirjam
Reply to
mirjam
.com/~bernardschopen/
Thank you for this Information , as we have some unkind insects ,,, brrrr mirjam
Reply to
mirjam
singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth.milky-way.comhttp://members.tripod.com/~bernardschopen/> > Thank you for this Information , as we have some unkind insects ,,, > brrrr> mirjam
Apparently, the particles are large enough to block the breathing apparatus of the spider, so it dies from the spray. That's the only insect I've used it on because we don't have many problems with insects here.
When I lived in south Florida, we had lots of insects of all kinds and it was a constant battle. There we did things like put baking soda or Epsom salts on the thresholds and window frames, in the grooves. My cousin in Orlando is using an electric gadget she plugs in and which supposedly emits a sound that keeps the bugs out, but we can't hear it. She says it's working.
Reply to
Pogonip
Actually it's probably a translation problem.
We have dishwashing liquid here, which is used for washing dishes by hand, in the sink.
And we have automatic dishwasher detergent, which comes as a powder or liquid or gel and is used in dishwashing machines. You certainly wouldn't want to put your hands into it, even diluted in a sinkful of water, not on a regular basis, anyhow. That's the stuff I was talking about.
The other problem, which I know about now but didn't back then, is that the dye used to create blue/green or turquoise is chemically sensitive. I learned about this particular issue when I did a lot of tie-dying. Those dyes that contained or were based on turquoise bleached out easily in sunlight and faded when exposed to chlorine, even in the concentrations found in swimming pool water.
Reply to
Kathleen
No i don`t think it was a translation problem , more a `habit` problem , when i reffered to Dishwashing Cream i meant the one i use to wash dishes by hand [ just like the liquid but in cream form ,,,, i dob`t touch these with my hands either, only with Rubber gloves ,,, But it is a great stain remover !!!1 The Machine dishwash comes in little cubes ,,,not useful as is !!! mirjam
Reply to
mirjam

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