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Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments

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Bummer.


I don't recall the details but it had to do with erroneous reports on
American autos.  It was all over the news some years back.

--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI, Shakespeare)

Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments
On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 11:20:36 -0500, Phaedrine

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It was bicycles that put me off Consumer Reports.  Twenty or thirty
years ago they ran a review of bikes, and introduced it by saying that
only a person who "likes to punish himself" would want a lightweight,
easy-to-pedal bike that can be repaired, therefore they were  going to
review only the very cheapest disposable bikes.  

Didn't help that I happened to be walking through the room when the CR
TV show was reviewing a miniature battery-operated sewing machine.
After ten minutes or so of "will it work? (pant pant) will it work?"
hype, they plugged it in, the needle went up and down:  "IT WORKS!!!!"
Joy Beeson
--
http://joybeeson.home.comcast.net/
http://roughsewing.home.comcast.net/ -- needlework
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Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments (was: new towels smell-help) please
I use the same detergent I always used ( but I use way less -- I now
use a small plastic coffee measure for my detergent - 1 little scoop
per load), I use the same pre-spotter, same bleach.. No special
detergents, or other "special"  supplies...   "Special" supplies are
so much nonsense... Look in your own grocery store, and read the boxes
for everyday, branded detergents.. They all invariably list front
loading washers as well as the top loaders.

I also have what I call "special needs"  loads of wash, which I *must*
use liquid "baby" detergent on (Ivory Snow, Dreft), and I find a
bottle of this now lasts me about a year, instead of about a month.
(This is a must for some elastics -- NEVER, EVER use "Woolite" on
items with elastic in them -- "Woolite" is formulated for use on
natural fibers, which it does a wonderful job on.. It was never
formulated for elastic or rubber, which it will cause to "rot"
prematurely...)

Yes, they now have platforms you can buy to raise the machines up
about a foot (many of these are actually storage drawers as well).

I also find that the front loader is quieter than any top loader I
have had.

Some of the older front loaders had a musty smell problem (especially
the Maytag Neptunes - they were recalled  and retrofitted at no charge
for this problem), but the newer machines have been improved, and do
not have the musty smell problems AFAIK..

Yes, the machines are pricier, but they pay for themselves in using
less water, and supplies, as well as keeping your clothes newer longer
(tumbling action means less wear and tear on the fabrics)..  Also,
they have less moving parts than top-loaders, so they are reportedly
easier/cheaper to repair when something goes wrong (as an example,
they do not have a "transmission", but simple rubber belts instead)

I no longer trust CR at all.  Sometimes CR's reviewers can't see the
forest for the trees, and way too much payola there...

Soaking laundry... Most normal loads you cannot soak because of the
smaller amount of water in the washer.. When I  really need to soak
something, I use the sink or a tub.  Door seals: I have not seen one
of these fail yet, but my neighbor has used front loaders for 35
years, and she told me that one door seal failed on her last machine,
after 15 years of daily use.

One more thing, I have found that my front loader gets the clothes
considerably cleaner than the TOL Maytag top loader it replaced.

me


On Tue, 25 Apr 2006 23:38:02 -0500, Phaedrine

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Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments (was: new towels smell-help) please
wrote:

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Can you use liquid detergent?  I haven't used powders in years because
it contains a lot of salt which is very bad for the soil and for septic
systems.

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That is good news.  And thanks so much for all the helpful info!!

[...]

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This would be rather cumbersome for bedding, unfortunately.

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With the exception of the soak problem, I'm actually starting to look
forward to a front loader!

Phae

--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI, Shakespeare)

Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments
Phaedrine wrote:

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Phae,

I use Sears Ultra Plus powder most of the time, because when I was
researching the wm before buying, several posters at Epinions.com who
had the HE3 recommended it.  My recollection is that UP doesn't have
additives, but I don't have any fine print to read just now because I
discarded the most recent box after transferring the last bit into my
plastic dispenser (the box holds 20 lbs and is big and unwieldy).

Sears often puts UP on sale half price.  The first 20 lbs we bought
lasted from February til November...$10 worth of detergent instead of an
estimated $50-$60 with my top loader.

The HE3 manual recommends using liquid detergent for delicate,
cold-water loads, because with that cycle's reduced action and cold
water a powder might not dissolve as well.  I did buy some liquid
recommended for front loaders and have used it a few times.

Doreen in Alabama

Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments (was: new towels smell-help) please

Yes, you certainly can use regular liquid laundry detergent, I use
that with elastic based materials, and I use woolite for natural
fibers (wool) without problems. (again, you just have to adjust down
and use less per load)

me

On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 11:59:21 -0500, Phaedrine

<snippity>
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Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments (was: new towels smel...
Why use powder detergent? It must disolve anyway.  An appliance repair
man friend told me he had more calls from people who use powder
detergent.  And the product we use to counteract the graying process in
whites is called "Calgon"   Dot in Tenessee





Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments
Phaedrine wrote:

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I use liquid detergent.  Usually All Free because it contains no perfume
or color.

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I sometimes stop the washer in the wash cycle, which effectively soaks
the contents.
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My door seal doesn't leak at all.  There seem to be several "layers" of
seal.
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In mine, I use a water conditioner - Boraxo or White King - and All
Ultra fabric softner.  We have water hard enough to chew.  My machine
also has a delay cycle, so I can load it and set it to come on later -
like when everyone is asleep.  Sometimes that is handy.  We have poor
water pressure in addition to hardness, rocks and tar that comes in the
pipes.
--
Joanne
stitches @ singerlady.reno.nv.us.earth
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Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments
wrote:

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All great news!  And none too soon either given the age of my Maytag.  
Thanks again. :)

--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI, Shakespeare)

Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments
Phaedrine wrote:

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I never bend: I either squat down on my heels or kneel, and drag the
stuff out into a basket, which fits just below the porthole.  And the
clothes are not much heavier than they are dry!  A LOT of water is
whizzed out of them!  :)  MOST things come out damp rather than wet and
heavy.  Some things WILL be wetter and heavier than they usually are:
not all things should be given the highest spin speed.  This is usually
variable, with different programs.
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You need to use a low suds detergent.  I don't think it costs any more
than the other stuff here: maybe less, it's the bigger seller!  I never
use bleach, bluing, or anything except a pre-wash spray on greasy marks,
or a specific treatment for ink or tar or whatever.  The washer will do
a cool pre-wash if you program it to: this will get out any loose dirt
before the main temperature wash.  While I like to boil wash some
things, I usually wash most coloured things at 30-40 degrees.

I sort stuff by colour as well: a dark load, a white (and pastels) load,
a coloured load...  Reds always get saved for a red load!  I pop a
colour catcher in with things that might bleed (always with quilts, for
example!).
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Yes, you can soak!  Just pick a washer with a soak program!  It'll
tumble them about a bit in a smaller amount of water, but I've never
needed to soak things: that's what the pre-wash program is for!  As for
blood stained cotton sheets: pre-wash and then boil wash, all dialed up
as one program.  For poly/cotton mix sheets, I use the same treatment
with a 50-60 degree wash.

My last washer lasted over 12 years: the door seal was fine when it died
of main bearing failure!  This one is over six years old, and the door
seal is perfect - one of the few bits that is!  :(  Looks like it too
will outlast the drum, bearings, switches, trim... and everything else
that's disintegrating...  :(
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Wash them on the delicates cycle!  Slower tumbling when wet, slower spin
speeds, and a leeetle more water than a conventional load per weight of
clothes...  mine washes far better than hand washing!

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In 25 years of ownership and close to 40 years of experience of front
loaders (my mum bought her first in the late 60's when we came back from
Malta) I've never seen this.  You WILL get it if you leave a load damp
in the washer for too many days!  Not a problem in the winter, but don't
go away for a week in the summer and leave summat in there!

And yes, you can use any type of *low suds* powder.

If you live in a hard water area (as we do - taps filled courtesy of
Blue Circle!), consider getting a water softener fitted.  I use a third
or less than the recommended dose for soft water areas.  It prolongs the
life of the machine, your shower, and your central heating!  Other wise
you can always add a softener to the wash load, or descale the washer
every so often.

Fabric softeners go in a special dispenser in the soap drawer, and are
added at the right time in the rinse cycle.  I find with the soft water
and the much smaller amounts of powder I use (and the large number of
performance enhanced hi-tec fabrics in a lot of our clothing that forbid
fabric softener use!) that I never use it!  Another expense saved!

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments

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All detergents here are low suds by definition.  Most anything that
isn't is called a soap.  But many of the front loaders recommend HE
detergent.  It's good to know that is not necessary if it does cost
more.  Once or twice a year, I like to use blueing on my white linens.  
That really makes them look like new again.

Incredibly, I had the Bosch serviceman here this AM to replace a
warranty part in my dishwasher.  This guy knew a lot about the front
loaders and gave me a complete rundown.  He said they are improving but
that door seals and musty odors have been a problem in the earlier
models.  He also quoted me studies that he got when he went to Bosch,
Whirlpool, and Maytag schools that give stats on actual energy savings.  
I told him how timely was his visit and information.  He also said that
the earlier models here were not nearly as good as they are in Europe.  
That did not surprise me since the US is such a "throw-away" society.  
But with the much higher cost of the front loading machines, maybe
people will come to expect and receive better quality.

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I checked on the age of my Maytag and was shocked.  We bought it in 88
so it is 18 years old and still, knock on wood, going strong.  I hope it
lasts long enough so that I can get a front loader with all the bugs
worked out!

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Good... good... that is all good.  What about underwires?  By hand?  

[...]
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Fortunately, our water is just the right PH and quite soft.  Though we
have a rural septic system, we do get city water.  When I lived in
Wisconsin, we had a water softener and you really had to watch not to
use too much soap.  Fabric softener is really hard on a septic system so
I tend to use it sparingly and not too often.

--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI, Shakespeare)

Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments
Phaedrine wrote:

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One is *supposed* to wash them by hand anyway, but...  ;)  No, I just
pop them in a net lingerie bag and bung 'em in on the ordinary light
coloured  load (or darks if it's the black ones!) along with the rest of
the undies.

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Most of my clothes feel better without it!  :)

To refer back to the bluing thing:  I don't do that, I have some
Glo-White stuff for refreshing dull things and things grayed by the
occasional stray sock.  Works a treat!  :)

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments

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Well that is good news.  I've been washing mine by hand for years.

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I have not heard of that product.  I don't think they have it here.  
It's not similar to blueing I take it.

--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI, Shakespeare)

Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments
Phaedrine wrote:

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No it's not an optical whitener: it removes the grunge and the stains
and gives fabrics that Just New look again - except it doesn't mend
holes!  I use it to rescue James's school shirts, which get stained with
paint, felt tip pen, ink, whatever, at school, and, as i say, to remove
the grungy gray left when you leave a dark sock in the drum...

Hey - some of the newer front loaders have a light that comes on when
you open the door, so you can SEE those lurking socks and nab 'em!  :)

Here's some more info:  http://tinyurl.com/eahct

--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
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Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments

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Same here, stick them in a lingerie bag and put with the appropriate colored
'gentle' stuff, then hang to dry in a bathroom.  Been doing this for years.

Jean



Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments
Kate, I don't even put them in a lingerie bag (although I do put my
nylons in one and machine wash and dry them--they last longer that way).
My method of keeping my dainties (upper half, underwired version) in
good shape is to simply hook the back before it goes into the wash. They
last a lot longer in the front loader, too, since they don't get as
tangled as they did in the top loader.

Phae, I do use the HE version of liquid Tide, and it does not cost
noticeably more. However, our local TV station pointed out in one of
their "don't waste your money" segments that the CAPS are bigger on some
bottles! Since you're supposed to use the cap to measure the amount,
that is pretty darned sneaky. We have a small measuring cup on the top
of the washer, and that's what we use now, instead of the cap. Tide, by
the way, is made by Procter & Gamble, which is a major Cincinnati
company. I have noticed that some of the bottles in the store where I
bought it last time had large caps, and some had small ones. Odd.

As we've been having this discussion, I've been doing laundry, and I
want you to know that it IS possible to soak clothing or anything else
in the front loading machines. I use Eucalan Woolwash on my sweaters and
other woolens, and the way I do it is to throw them in the washer along
with the prescribed amount of Eucalan, then turn the dial to "gentle"
wash with cold water. I allow it to "agitate"--which is really just
revolved back and forth--a few times, enough to wet the fabric
thoroughly, then turn off the washer and let it "soak" for half an hour.
Then I turn the dial to "spin", and let the water (and the soil) spin
away. It really does an amazing job of cleaning woolens, both the washer
and the Eucalan. They are refreshed, they smell better, and they are
mothproofed via the eucalyptus in the Eucalan, and the soils removed.

Karen Maslowski in Cincinnati
www.sewstorm.com


Kate Dicey wrote:
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Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments

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How enlightening!  Now we should have a pool to see how long my 18 year
old Maytag will last.  Actually it could even be older.  I just know we
had it when we moved to Milwaukee in 1988.  For once in my life, I will
actually be prepared when a major appliance bites the dust!  Thanks
again. :)

Phae

--
I fear me you but warm the starved snake,
Who, cherished in your breasts, will sting your hearts. (Henry VI, Shakespeare)

Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments
No front loader for me, if I ever knelt down or squatted on my heels I
would still be there, no trouble getting down but getting up is another
story.  I was taught that soaking and washing blood stained anything
should be done with cold water, that hot water sets the stains.  My last
washer was 35 years old when I discarded it  and it's only problem was
it was leaking.  It was a Speed Queen with a stainless steel drum, the
matching dryer was still perking right along so I gave them away as a
pair. I bought a new pair of high dollar Maytags.  They will probably
last until next year...maybe.                            Dot in
Tennessee





Re: Washers for Our Wonderfully Sewn Garments

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LOL!  When we moved into this house 35 years ago, we bought a set of
Whirlpool (top-load washer, electric dryer), and they worked perfectly
(with just a few minor repairs by DH) until one day I came home from
shopping and found a flood in the basement laundry room.  The "float
valve" or some-such had given up.  We decided that the Whirlpools had
done such good service that we'd get another set.  That was 10 years
ago...

Fingers crossed,

Beverly



Re: new towels smell-help please
Phaedrine wrote:

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Here they tend to be hot and cold fill, and the machine has a thermostat
and heater that keep the water at the required temperature.  It uses
less energy to heat the water by gas than electricity.
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The drums turn faster, forcing less water through the clothes, I think..
  I'd have to look it up.  It's very simple and quite cleaver, but I'm
not sure exactly how it works.  My machine uses far less water than its
predecessor, and I've never had a problem with things coming out still
smelly or dirty.  Newer ones use even less, and some weigh the load and
add water according to load size!  Mine washes very well indeed at all
temperatures.  I won't be buying another Whirlpool, however, as their
after sales sucks!  And the thing's been cracking up since it was less
than a month old...
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Oh, good!  :) I'm with you on the stiletto heels...  maybe we ought to
get together and let him know what it's like to be stepped on by them!  ;)

Oh, I REALLY couldn't stand a slow shower!  Mine is full blast!  It's
great: I save water by being able to have a shower and rinse my long
thick hair in five to seven minutes!  Oh, and you save a hell of a lot
of water by using half the recommended dose of shampoo and conditioner,
and only doing a single wash!  There's no need for 'rinse and repeat' if
you wash your hair three times a week or more, unless you do a really
dirty job!

I never water my lawn, and we're getting a water barrel for watering the
tubs when I start tub gardening again.  We've had a hosepipe ban for two
years here: after our lack of winter rain the aquifers are only at 60%
in this area, despite floods in Hastings last month!
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--
Kate  XXXXXX  R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

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