Recommendation of Bread Making Machine

I am looking for a bread making machine to make home-made bread. I
want a machine that can provide more variation, like raisin dispenser,
dough-preparation (so that I can bake in my oven for danish, bagel
etc). Any recommendation for a machine less than $300? Where can I
order via Internet?
Reply to
Evan
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dispenser,
Buy the least expensive ABM you can find, especially if it's your first.
Go here:
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Reply to
Sheldon
I would recommend that you get a food processor. It will mix and knead the bread very quickly and you can make any variation that you want. Since you are going to bake in your oven anyway, this seems like the ideal solution. I use my FP for nearly all my dough preparation, except when I want large quantities.
Reply to
Vox Humana
We have had our Zojirushi for 4 years now and have really enjoyed it, mostly using it to bake breads rather than just dough. We've used it at least once a week all this time. Did have a problem with the pan but it was replaced under warranty for free.
You can check it out on amazon at:
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Reply to
Sharon
There's a review of Bread machines here:
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you are planning on baking in your machine, look closely at the shape ofthe pan. I'm using the Zojurishi which I picked primarily because the shapeof the pan was more like a conventional bread pan. The "Zo" doesn't have afruit & nut dispenser, but it does sound a "beep" to remind you when to addthem. Breadman has a machine with a dispenser, but I've read that thedispensers aren't big enough... Check the machines at Amazon.com, they have several of the manuals in pdf format, it's always nice to read the manual before making a purchase.
Rina
Reply to
Rina
Thanks for your helpful information. I think Zojurishi is the recommended one. Did any of you try the Panasonic before? It seemed these 2 models are the most popular.
Hi Vox, I need the machine, rather food processor, as I want the machine to start baking before my breakfast with defer-start mode or timer. The dough preparation is only for some occasional uses.
Reply to
Evan
I have had a Zo for over a year now and love it. It is a true workhorse and handles even stiff bagel dough with ease. I mainly use the dough cycle though the Zo does produce great breads baked in the machine. As someone else already stated the Zo does not have a dispenser but does have an add in beep so you can add your goodies then. I purchased my first Zo through Amazon.com but it was defective. Had no trouble returning it and got my money back right away. Ordered my current one from King Arthur Flour as they also use these machines and offered me lots of help, especially when I wanted to put in a special whole-wheat program into it, which works amazing I might add. Happy Shopping, Annie
Reply to
Anne Angle
I got lucky and found an automatic bread maker in a thrift shop for 20 dollars. Mine is a Welbilt. If I bought a new one, it would have been a Zojirushi. You can get something quite respectable for $195, and I've seen workable bread machines for $128. You can make breads in it or prepare doughs for pizzas, bagels, french bread, pastries, etc. I even make pannetone and brioche in there. If you don't have objections to used equipment, now that many people have gone carb crazy and eating bread has become verboten for them, there are plenty of bread machines out there to be had for almost nothing. Good luck!
dispenser,
Reply to
nadiarosina
I've had this one for several years and have been very happy with it.
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Reply to
AL
I first had an Oster; it lasted until just about a month after the warranty was up, then died. I tossed it.
I then received a West Bend as a gift. If I recall, it was relatively inexpensive, and had few features, but it was a real workhorse. It made great bread for years. I had to give it up to the ex in the divorce, 'cause she liked it so much.
I now have a Zojirushi, which I like, but haven't used all that much. I echo the comments of the other posters about it, as far as my experience goes.
Reply to
Nobody
Especially if it's your first... why invest hundreds into something that will occupy a serious amount of counter space and when there's a 50/50 chance it'll get used after the first few loaves... about half the ABMs end up in the garage awaiting the next tag sale. I have mine about 8 years now and admit I don't use it nearly as often as I did the first year, in fact it's use has declined steadily each year. Here it is already April and so far this year I used it twice.
Sheldon
Reply to
Sheldon
I think I have a regal. I can't remember the last time I used it. It makes my bread too dark, even on the light crust setting. So, it needs to be babysat, at the end, since you can't let if finish the cycle.
I have a KitchenAid mixer that keads bread dough just fine and I like having control over the baking part. So, yeah, I should get rid of the bread machine. I guess I'm not a bread machine person.
I also like smelling my bread being created, as I add ingredients and mix it together. I missed that with the bread machine!
Dawn
Reply to
DawnK
Thanks again for your comment.
For those "Zo" user, I have a question - some comment/review from Internet have mentioned that the machine cannot bake well, and they need to finish it in their oven. Is it true? Or is it just a misuse issue?
Reply to
Evan
Probably a preference issue. If the ABM doesn't bake the bread to your preference, then it doesn't "bake well". If you like crusty bread, an ABM is probably not for you. If you like bread with a really soft crust, an ABM is probably not for you.
Personally, I have a Panasonic, and I use it at least once a week. There are people who don't like the bread from their Panasonics either because it's too dark or too light (I've heard both).
If you are really picky about your bread, get a KA and make your own. Me, I just want sandwich bread that my kids will eat and that doesn't cost $1.50/loaf on sale. I can make bread by hand, but I have chosen not to. -- Jenn Ridley : snipped-for-privacy@chartermi.net
Reply to
Jenn Ridley
It's not a "misuse", it's a matter of personal preference...
The machine bakes very well, it's basic bread cycle seems to bake about 10 minutes too long for my taste.. but that can be controlled by taking the bread out sooner, baking on the sandwich cycle, creating a custom program with a shorter bake time or using the dough cycle and baking in your own oven.
Most "fussy" users opt for the dough cycle and oven baking, because it's quicker and you end up with a loaf without the two tiny holes from the paddles/posts... and it frees up the machine to start more dough for something else!
Rina
Reply to
Rina
I do two types of bread: what I call "stupid-simple" recipes that I just dump into the Oster (the el-cheapo $50 unit) and let it go for the gusto, kneading and fermenting with added temperature, and then I pop that dough out and let it proof in a regular bread pan for an oven bake. For more rustic and high-effort stuff I like to use the Electrolux Assistent (sic) mixer, which took some getting used to but now, I'd never be without it. It just does a fabulous job on any dough you want from stiff stuff to "dough" that resembles batter.
But, as you sound like you want it ready and baked in the machine, I'd just go for the least expensive model out there, like I say the Oster we have had for a long time does a decent job and produces edible bread with little fuss.
Reply to
eno
Can't complain. I have a YD150. I don't even know if they make that size anymore. I put the ingredients in, bread comes out. It's been in heavy use for almost eight years now (1-2 loaves of bread a week, minimum). The only failures I've had have been either user error or due to badly timed power outages.
We replaced the beater after five years (DH pulled it out of a loaf of bread with a knife, and scratched the non-stick coating, and eventually the non-stick coating got enough scratches in it that it stuck to the bread more often than it stay in the pan). That was a particularly grabby loaf of bread - usually the beater blade stays in the pan when I drop the bread out.
Last summer, I had to replace the connecting shaft that goes from the motor to the beater blade - after seven years of hard use, the gasket had stopped being flexible and waterproof, and water was leaking out of the pan. It's an easily replaceable part, though.
Didn't have a problem getting the parts - I ordered them from Panasonic and they showed up a week later. -- Jenn Ridley : snipped-for-privacy@chartermi.net
Reply to
Jenn Ridley

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