Query regarding glass surfaces?

I?ve got a query relating to glass surfaces. I?ve noticed that glaziers can fit special non-reflective glass to picture frames. I?ve felt the surface of this special type of glass, and it is very very slightly rough. It is perfectly clear and the picture can be seen perfectly, but there is no glare or reflection visible. I wanted to know whether or not this special type of non-reflective glass "fogs up" in warm humid conditions. Perhaps the slightly rough surface may prevent condensation forming? If a mixture of ultra fine glass bead powder and clear acrylic lacquer (and lacquer thinners) was sprayed evenly on a glass surface, this would result in a very fine rough surface. Could this possibly prevent fogging/condensation on the surface?
Reply to
Gas Bag

I?ve got a query relating to glass surfaces. I?ve noticed that glaziers can fit special non-reflective glass to picture frames. I?ve felt the surface of this special type of glass, and it is very very slightly rough. It is perfectly clear and the picture can be seen perfectly, but there is no glare or reflection visible. I wanted to know whether or not this special type of non-reflective glass "fogs up" in warm humid conditions. Perhaps the slightly rough surface may prevent condensation forming? If a mixture of ultra fine glass bead powder and clear acrylic lacquer (and lacquer thinners) was sprayed evenly on a glass surface, this would result in a very fine rough surface. Could this possibly prevent fogging/condensation on the surface?
There are products out there that do that, google for it. hint: it is a liquid.
Reply to
green
Green
Thanks for your reply?..and all the others. I?m well aware there are a whole variety of anti-fog liquids/gels/waxes available. In fact there?s a particular brand that I use for masks/goggles - it?s absolutely amazing, and I swear by it. (I?m more than happy to let you know, but I don?t want to seem like an advertisement for them) But what I?m trying to do is achieve a permanent effect that is 100% effective; there already is some technology out there that does exactly that. Take a look:
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As fogging on glass/plastic surfaces is caused by water?s surface tension, I thought perhaps a very slightly rough surface might help break the surface tension of the tiny water droplets. I?m guessing probably not, but there?s no harm in asking.
Regards
Gas Bag
Reply to
Gas Bag
If it is a hydrated silicate surface you monolayer it with a reactive silane, RSiX3. -X is typically -OMe or -Cl. R is typically a three atom spacer then a quaternized ammonium with counterion. That drastically reduces the surface tension and water sheets not fogs. Presumably a PEO or poly(vinylpyrrolidinone) oligomer tail would also the job.
Rain-X takes the opposite tack. Now R is a silicone oligomer and the treated surface is hyperhydrophobic. Water violently beads but a breeze blows it off. Very nice for windshields - your wipers glide across the surface if you need them at all. After treatment, lightly burnish the surface, wipe with rubbing alcohol, and burnish again. That gets rid of most of the residual goo.
One wonders why competition swimmers don't "condition" their skin with hydrophobes. Uncoupling the otherwise wetted surface would substantially decrease friction.
Reply to
Uncle Al
(snip)
Now that everybody knows, we should expect pre-competition exams by forensic dermatologists at Olympic swim meets.
Reply to
Bryce

they tried this in the America's Cup sailboat races, along with something akin to sharkskin riblets, but those ideas were quickly banned.
Reply to
charlie

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