Best stabiliser for knit fabrics?


Specifically t-shirts? I am appliquing things to t-shirts for Baby T,
and I have tried several different stabilisers, only to have them
"tunnel" when removed. I tried several that tear away, and I have tried
a couple that stay in after you've satin stitched around your design.
So which stabiliser do you use when appliquing things onto a knitted
fabric? (I realise that I should probably post this question in the
sewing newsgroup, but many of you here do garment sewing and
embellishing as well.....)
-- Jo in Scotland
Reply to
Jo Gibson
I don't want to get too technical here, Jo, (for me or you) but you must do some testing to be sure that the tensions you are setting don't 'pinch' the knit - or woven, for that matter. Just routinely, when I do buttonholes, I release the upper tension from a standard setting of 5 down to 3. That prevents the buttonhole from squeezing in a tiny pinch. Translation if that one shot right over your shoulder - a buttonhole is sort of the same thing as a satin stitch. So. Diddle with your tension settings. Also, if you are hooping, you just may be hooping too tight. Knits have a 'memory' and will spring back to where they like to be when released from the hoop. My current favorite stabilizers are the ones that disappear when soaked for a little while in water. I think these result in a softer surface for baby skin. Now that Baby T is talking, he may tell people that you make his shirts itchy. Polly
Reply to
Polly Esther
Thanks for the tip - I think you mean something like "Sulky Solvy"? I don't use a hoop... hadn't even thought of that. My usual tension setting for the sewing machine is 3.5 and for the appliques I set it down to 2. It goes great for a while, then the thread snaps. If I set it lower, the "satin" of the stitch is lost, and the loops start sneaking out from the sides to the middle.
Is it really so hard? Should I just back these designs with interfacing, stitch, turn, and hand applique? I thought I was onto a good thing here....
Baby T always wears a vest under his clothes anyway, so I don't think he could have much itchiness. He hasn't complained about anything yet (!)
Oh, and avacado is food from the goods apparently. It's good enough to make you wiggle all over and go "heh heeee!"
-- Jo in Scotland
Reply to
Jo Gibson
Lower the tension, then use soluble stabilizer on top, more soluble and/or tear away on the bottom. If you hoop make sure that the stabilizer is in the hoop so that you don't stretch the knit. Bonnie, in Middletown, VA
On Tue, 27 Jul 2010 18:19:37 +0100, Jo Gibson wrote:
Reply to
Bonnie Patterson
No, Jo. It's not really so hard. You just need to get a hunk of knit and experiment until you get it right. A 'too ugly to wear' t-shirt is an okay testing ground. I'm concerned that you're saying your thread snaps. I can't think of a reason for that to be adding to the equation. Maybe you need a different needle. You will be needing to do lots of appliqué for that sweet darling through the years. Might as well figure out how and write down thorough notes. Polly
"Bonnie Patterson" <
Reply to
Polly Esther
One more question - do you use a pointy needle, because it's going through quilting cotton (for the appliques) or do you use a stretch needle because the base fabric is knit?
-- Jo in Scotland
Reply to
Jo Gibson
On Thu, 29 Jul 2010 16:33:01 -0500, Jo Gibson wrote (in article ):
I'd probably use an embroidery needle. Which I guess is pointy?
Maureen
Reply to
Maureen Wozniak
You should use a ball point needle. The sharper ones will cut the knit fibers. The ball point goes between the "loops" on knit fabric. Gen
Reply to
Gen

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