Advice re Sewing Machine

Hello --
I've been lurking awhile, this is my first post. I need to buy an
inexpensive, simple, lightweight sewing machine to carry to quilting
classes. I presently have an old Singer which works okay but weighs a
ton-and-a-half, it's a killer to schlep around. I've seen several
inexpensive machines in the stores which I know will not be the greatest
machines but for this purpose might be fine. Does anyone have any
experience / recommendations? I'm hoping to keep it to under $200... my
other ulterior motive for keeping it cheap is that I'm asking Santa for a
nice new "real" machine so don't want to spend much in the meantime.
Thanks!
Cindi
Reply to
CindiA
Are you going to quilt on this machine , or just piece? Takes a pretty solid machine to quilt, but piecing is less of an issue, since the fabrics are lighter.
At under $200, I'd probably be looking at a basic Janome. They also make Kenmore. Something like the Jem series or Magnolia series machines, but they're not going to be happy doing major quilting projects. The Jems are about 12 lbs, the Magnolias about 18. You won't get the needle up/down functions that are useful when you want to piece curves or do Y seams, though.
Kay
Reply to
Kay Lancaster
Kay, I'll be using it mainly to carry to quilting classes. I'm a beginner so just piecing for now. I do sew in general, used to sew a lot of clothes but now mostly crafts. So I should be okay with an inexpensive machine, and then have a good machine for bigger jobs. I was looking at a couple of the Brother machines, they have fairly good ratings at Consumers Digest and Consumer Reports. I'll investigate the Janome and Kenmores, as you suggest. Thanks!
Are you going to quilt on this machine , or just piece? Takes a pretty solid machine to quilt, but piecing is less of an issue, since the fabrics are lighter.
At under $200, I'd probably be looking at a basic Janome. They also make Kenmore. Something like the Jem series or Magnolia series machines, but they're not going to be happy doing major quilting projects. The Jems are about 12 lbs, the Magnolias about 18. You won't get the needle up/down functions that are useful when you want to piece curves or do Y seams, though.
Kay
Reply to
CindiA
I have a Janome and love it. With that said my grandmother has the brother sewing emboridery machine combo and just a plain brother emboridery machine. She is the second owner of the brother emboridery machine and it has held up well. So far she has just had to have maintenance done to it.
Reply to
victoriaphillip
Just as a follow-up in case anyone is also shopping for a similar machine: I ended up getting a Brother CE8080. It's working out fine, at least for the purpose for which I bought it (carting to quilting class). It's not a great machine but it sews well and is extremely easy to use, and it's very lightweight. I appreciate all the recommendations, I'll keep them in mind for when I shop for the "good" machine. Thanks all!
Hello --
I've been lurking awhile, this is my first post. I need to buy an inexpensive, simple, lightweight sewing machine to carry to quilting classes. I presently have an old Singer which works okay but weighs a ton-and-a-half, it's a killer to schlep around. I've seen several inexpensive machines in the stores which I know will not be the greatest machines but for this purpose might be fine. Does anyone have any experience / recommendations? I'm hoping to keep it to under $200... my other ulterior motive for keeping it cheap is that I'm asking Santa for a nice new "real" machine so don't want to spend much in the meantime.
Thanks! Cindi
Reply to
CindiA
A machine that sells new for $144.97 at Wal-Mart as a "Limited Edition Project Runway" machine?
Good luck with that. Let us know if it holds tension after the first week.
Reply to
BEI Design
It's been several weeks and it's holding tension just fine. And here I thought this was such a welcoming group.
A machine that sells new for $144.97 at Wal-Mart as a "Limited Edition Project Runway" machine?
Good luck with that. Let us know if it holds tension after the first week.
Reply to
CindiA
It is, Beverly sometimes comes across a bit braash,but underneath she's a pussycat. Just don't cal her Bev. I also suggest you jump over to alt.sewing. there's more going on there and lots of people posting.
Reply to
Juno B
I'm just a cynic when it comes to $144.00 "sewing machines" from Wal-Mart/Costco/Amazon.com, etc.
In the sixties I paid over $700 for my new Singer 401A (which is still in everyday use).
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$700.00 in 1961 had the same buying power as $5,148.50 in 2011."
Put another way, $144.00 in 2011 dollars had the same buying power as $19.58 in 1961. I question whether anyone in 1961 would have thought a $19.58 sewing machine would have been a worthwhile investment.
I think a good 50-year-old well-maintained mechanical machine would be far better then a new 'plastic miracle' FWIW.
Reply to
BEI Design
I couldn't agree with you more.But and it's a big but, she's happy for now. I was stung about 20 years ago with a cheap wonder toy, learned my lesson and wouldn't tough another machine like it. Sometimes we have to learn the hard way. And your, still a pussycat. juno
Reply to
Juno B
Key phrasing there is "she's (and I'm guessing you're talking about me) happy for now." Which is all I asked for "for now."
FWIW, that is to say, to somewhat redeem myself in your eyes: Both of my parents worked their entire careers with Singer. As such I learned sewing by osmosis and was raised in a household that had more sewing machines than you could shake a stick at. Several of which I still own and use. I am certain beyond any doubt that both of them are furiously rolling over in their graves over my purchase of a cheap plastic Brother machine. LOL!! BUT they were also frugal and practical, and for the purposes that I wanted this machine, even they probably would've said "Yeah, buy the cheap one for schlepping to class and hold out for Santa to bring you a really good for-real one."
Reply to
CindiA
Please accept my sincere apology, I was not intending to be snarky. We just see so many newbies "here" who want to learn to sew, hope they can cut corners on their tools, but then are so frustrated by them they quit sewing all together.
My advice remains: with a small budget, an older well maintained mechanical machine will be a better investment. One can always keep it in reserve for the times when the 'good' machine goes in for regular service. I hope your Brother CE8080 performs well, and you get your dream machine soon. ;-)
Reply to
BEI Design

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