Slightly OT-Compressors

I'm looking for a compressor for my shop--mostly to move dust around and
clean up but also to nail & brad a few small projects--nothing like framing
or roofing.
Anyone have any suggestions? How are these Kobalt compressors Lowe's sells?
Since this is probably a one time purchase I'm less concerned with money (up
to maybe $300) than reliability.
Thanks,
Tom in Howell, NJ
Reply to
Teejay
I have an old 3/4 horse Cambell Hausfeld that fits the bill well. I think they are under $200 now. Never mind what I paid for mine :-) or how long ago :-)
______ God bless and safe turning Darrell Feltmate Truro, NS, Canada
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Reply to
Darrell Feltmate
I can't tell you about brands of compressors but If you can, pipe as much as possible in stead of relying on hoses. I have four connections around the shop and one at the garage door for airing up tires etc. outside.
Reply to
Pat Salter
The "oil-less" models are hyped for their low maintenance, but they are LOUD! Save your hearing and get one that uses oil. It's not a big deal to change the oil every year.
Reply to
Mark Fisher
Just a word of warning. Don't buy anything too cheap or small, because after you have compressed air available in your shop you will find all kinds of good uses for it and wish you had bought a better compressor. It's amazing how much you can do with it and you will kick yourself for not buying one sooner. The oil type compressor lasts longer if you maintain it and it is much quieter than the oil-less type. A good size to start with is around 6-8 CFM at 90 PSI. It's big enough easily to run one tool at a time of almost anything that you might like to run except for a sand blaster. It will even handle a spray gun. You should be able to easily find one this size within your $300 budget. Some of the best deals that I've seen lately were at Tractor Supply but the Borgs have pretty good prices on them too.
Reply to
Charley
charley's suggestions are good - note also, buy CFM, don't even look at the horsepower - I've seen 8 HP comperessors that put out less than my old 2 hp sears compressor, and that would (at 7.2 cfm) barely keep up with a spray gun - I have a larger compressor now (Quincy) of the type that one finds in a commercial outfit - very much nicer - it has a pressurized oiling system with a real oil pump and a real oil pressure gauge - the sears unit used a splash system (like a lawm mower engine).
Reply to
William Noble
Sept. 2006 American Woodworker has an article on choosing compact compressors and an article on plumbing your shop with hoses. I have been looking also and maybe one day I will get one. I have found that up to 26 to 30 gallon tanks are 110 VAC and above that is 220VAC. Now my shop doesn't have 220 and I don't see it in the future. I too have been looking at Lowes and Home Depot. I will keep in mind the 6-8 CMF at 90 PSI. Good info from everyone, thanks
Bruce
Reply to
Bruce Ferguson
unless it's really impossible, you should consider getting 220 to where your tools are - with 220 wire sizes are smaller, the load is better balanced, and you can get more HP when you need it. I do my own wiring, but unless the run is long (or you live where you just don't have 220) it should not be expensive to get 220 to your shop/garage - code permits it everywhere I've heard of, and if you do some prework even a real electrician should only charge for an hour or two of work
Reply to
William Noble
I looked at lots of small portable "nailer-sized" compressors. All I wanted was something big enough to blow off shavings off my lathe and spray finish on some small items. All it took to change my mind was hearing one of the small oilless compressors run.
I switched strategies and bought a 6 HP upright oil-lube model with a 60-gallon tank from Home Depot. I can blow shavings all day long before it ever kicks on. And its quieter when it does run. The trade-off? It ain't very portable........unless you have a fork lift and a 220 volt extension cord.
Reply to
Barry N. Turner
On Tue, 19 Sep 2006 21:27:19 -0500, "Barry N. Turner" wrote:
Barry... how much was the compressor? Mac
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Reply to
mac davis
I have thought about it, but I would have to get it there as the main is towards the other end of the house. ( the panel is in the middle of the house and the garage is on the other side of an enclosed car port, my office. Conduit would have to be run externally) I would like to have a sub panel as I run everything off a lighting circuit. Is there a rule of thumb as how big the sub-panel can be?? The main is 100 amp. I am guessing you would run your wires and terminate them with a 220 breaker like for an oven or cloths dryer. What the would be I don't know. Then the sub panel would have a main and then breakers for your 220 circuits or 110 circuits. The size of these would depend on the tools attached to them. Thanks for your input.
Bruce
Reply to
Bruce Ferguson
your local electrical codes may vary - what I did was to run heavy wire to my garage - 8 gauge in fact - I have an old house that didn't have a master disconnect, so I replaced the breaker panel, added a 50 amp disconnect (2X50 amp breakers) and connected the house and the garage to the mains comming out of hte master breaker - so my garage has the same power as the house. cost was small, but I did it myself - I think the wire itself was the most expensive thing. If you run rigid conduit externally, use 1 inch conduit or even inch and a half, then burry it - that way it's up to all the codes and won't bother you by being obvious.
Reply to
William Noble

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